Category Archives: Faculty

ECU’s Flanagan joins National Athletic Trainers’ Association board

The National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) will formally welcome East Carolina University’s Katie Walsh Flanagan as one of two new board members during its 68th Clinical Symposia and AT Expo in Houston June 26-29.

Flanagan will replace District Three director Patricia Aronson.

“This continues to be an exciting time to lead the organization, and we will all benefit from the vision, commitment, enthusiasm and experience of our new board members,” said President Scott Sailor. “I welcome them to their new roles and look forward to all they will contribute in the years ahead.”

Katie Walsh Flanagan will be welcomed as a new board member at the National Athletic Trainers’ Association during its Clinical Symposia in Houston, Texas. (contributed photo)

Katie Walsh Flanagan will be welcomed as a new board member at the National Athletic Trainers’ Association during its Clinical Symposia in Houston, Texas. (contributed photo)

Flanagan is the director of athletic training education at ECU. Her work also includes research in policy and safety. She has authored and co-authored several NATA position statements as well as textbooks in athletic training. She previously served as the athletic trainer for NCAA Division I athletic teams in Illinois and California, the men’s professional soccer team in Chicago, and also served as an athletic trainer on several international trips with United States Soccer.

Flanagan has volunteered in many capacities for NATA and has served in roles in District Three as well as the North Carolina Athletic Trainers’ Association. Previously, she served on the Commission of Accreditation on Athletic Training Education executive board, including her role as vice president.

In 2012, Flanagan was inducted into the North Carolina Athletic Trainers’ Association Hall of Fame, and was twice named North Carolina College/University Athletic Trainer of the Year. She received many awards including NATA’s Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award in 2010, and Athletic Trainer Service Award in 2006. A native of Carmel, California, Flanagan resides in Greenville. She earned her undergraduate degree at Oregon State University, her master’s degree from Illinois State University and her doctorate of education from the University of Southern California.

The other new board member, Tony Fitzpatrick, has dedicated the last 29 years to the Boise (Idaho) School District, the last 19 of which have been at Timberline High School. He is currently the school’s head athletic trainer and sports medicine instructor and previously served as a biology instructor.

NATA trainers are health care professionals who specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries and sport-related illnesses. They prevent and treat chronic musculoskeletal injuries from sports, physical and occupational activity, and provide immediate care for acute injuries. Athletic trainers offer a continuum of care that is unparalleled in health care. NATA represents and supports 44,000 members of the athletic training profession. Visit www.nata.org for more information.

 

–by Jules Norwood

ECU professor of medicine named administrator for federal agency HRSA

A professor of medicine in the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University has been appointed by President Donald Trump as the new administrator for the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

On May 1, Dr. George Sigounas assumed oversight of HRSA, the primary federal agency for improving health care to people who are geographically isolated, or economically or medically vulnerable. HRSA’s $10.5 billion annual budget expands access to quality health care through an array of grants to state and local governments, health care providers and health professions training programs.

Dr. George Sigounas (Contributed photo)

Dr. George Sigounas (Contributed photo)

Sigounas has served for 23 years as a professor of medicine at Brody, where he helped establish the Bone Marrow Transplantation Program. His work with this program gave him extensive experience in designing and conducting clinical trials, preparing patient treatment protocols and performing fiscal management. He also directed the Cellular Therapies Clinical Unit which provided the Bone Marrow Transplantation Program with the cells used to transplant cancer patients.

“One of my primary reasons for coming to the Brody School of Medicine was to have the opportunity to participate in developing and operating a cellular therapies program that would provide service to the patients of eastern North Carolina,” Sigounas said. “The purpose of the program was for patients to remain close to home and not have to travel more than 100 miles to receive necessary treatment.

“Through the bone marrow program and by serving as faculty at a school focused on primary care for 23 years,” Sigounas added, “I developed a unique perspective on treating the undeserved and rural medicine as a whole, as well as on the providers who make this their professional objective… it was an eye-opening experience regarding the commitment and sacrifice which must be made to improve health care for those who need it most.”

In her recent announcement about Sigounas’ appointment, Diana Espinosa, deputy administrator for HRSA, said, “His involvement in the establishment and operation of a bone marrow transplantation program, clinical trials, and patient committees have provided Dr. Sigounas with extensive understanding of the various aspects involved in patient treatment, including treatment processes, and financial issues.”

From 1987 to 1994, Sigounas was a researcher at the National Institutes of Health and the Naval Medical Center. Through the years, his research efforts have resulted in several U.S. and international patents.

Sigounas earned a bachelor’s degree in biology and chemistry from the University of Patras in Greece, a master’s in physiology and biology from Northeastern University, and a Ph.D. in cell biology and physiology from Boston University.

Sigounas is on an approved leave of absence from Brody and expected to return in January 2020.

 

 

-by Amy Ellis, University Communication

CRW Family Fun Day 2017!

Friendly Reminder!

Join Campus Recreation & Wellness for an afternoon of family fun at the North Recreational Complex this Sunday, June 4, 2017 from 2-5pm. There will be zip lining (ages 8 and up with closed toed shoes), boating, fitness walk, a treasure hunt, basketball toss, face painting, inflatables, and water activities!

For those with children attending the CRW Summer Camp, parents and kids can meet with the camp counselors they will be hanging with this summer.

For Family Fun Day, each child must be accompanied by an adult and all adults will check in on-site with an ECU 1Card or ID and sign a waiver for themselves and any minor.

For more information, please contact Jenny Gregory at 328-6387 or gregoryje@ecu.edu.

Honor society inducts new members

The East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) recently inducted seven new members.

Third-year medical students Amanda Carringer, Drew Crenshaw, Jinal Desai, Drew Gardner, Talia Horwitz, Wooten Jones, and Jaleeka Rudd were chosen by their peers for membership and honored at a dinner and induction ceremony at Ironwood Golf and Country Club on May 1.

Recent inductees into the Brody School of Medicine chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society are, front row from left, Wooten Jones, Drew Crenshaw and Drew Gardner; back row from left, Jaleeka Rudd, Talia Horwitz, Jinal Desai and Amanda Carringer. (Photos by Gretchen Baugh)

Recent inductees into the Brody School of Medicine chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society are, front row from left, Wooten Jones, Drew Crenshaw and Drew Gardner; back row from left, Jaleeka Rudd, Talia Horwitz, Jinal Desai and Amanda Carringer. (Photos by Gretchen Baugh)

“The Gold Humanism Honor Society recognizes students, residents and faculty who are exemplars of compassionate patient care and who serve as role models, mentors and leaders in medicine,” said Dr. Hellen Ransom, assistant professor of bioethics at Brody and GHHS faculty advisor. “GHHS members are the individuals whose peers would want them taking care of their own families.”

Drs. Manuel Izquierdo, left, and Hannah Fuhr, 2017 recipients of the Humanism and Excellence in Teaching Award. Not pictured is Dr. Stephanie Simmons.

Drs. Manuel Izquierdo, left, and Hannah Fuhr, 2017 recipients of the Humanism and Excellence in Teaching Award. Not pictured is Dr. Stephanie Simmons.

Also recognized at the event were the 2017 recipients of the Humanism and Excellence in Teaching Award sponsored by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation. Internal medicine resident Dr. Hannah Fuhr, internal medicine-pediatrics resident Dr. Manuel Izquierdo and obstetrics-gynecology resident Dr. Stephanie Simmons were selected by the third-year medical class for exemplifying humanism in their teaching and patient interactions.

Established in 2002 by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) is an international association of individuals and medical school chapters whose members are selected as exemplars of empathy, compassion, altruism, integrity, service, excellence and respect in their relationships with patients and others in the field of medicine.

The Brody chapter of the organization was founded in 2011. Membership is by peer selection in the third year of medical school. During their fourth year, members are responsible for executing a project that exemplifies humanism, sponsoring a fundraising event and participating in National Solidarity Day for Compassionate Patient Care.

 

 

-by Amy Ellis, University Communication 

 

ECU faculty receive national funding to work with veterans and their families

Three East Carolina University faculty members have been awarded almost $98,000 in grant funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities to work with veterans and their families.

Dr. Jennifer McKinnon, associate professor of history in the Maritime Studies Program and project director, Dr. Anna Foula, associate professor of film studies in the Department of English, and Dr. Anne Ticknor, associate professor of literacy studies in the College of Education, comprise the interdisciplinary research team.

The faculty members will work with Saipanese veterans of contemporary wars, surviving civilian participants of World War II and families of military service personnel to learn more about war’s universal impact on humanity.

McKinnon has collaborated with the Saipan community for nearly 10 years on heritage sites on land and under water. Froula has published widely on the representations of war and service personnel in popular culture as well as advises student veterans at ECU. Ticknor, a literacy educator for 20 years, researches identities.

Two ECU proposals were among 15 projects to receive funding through the NEH Dialogues on the Experience of War grant program. Part of NEH’s Standing Together initiative, the grants provide opportunities for veterans, through the study and discussion of important humanities sources, to think more deeply about issues raised by war and military service.

The funding will allow ECU faculty to travel to Saipan for two weeks in July to prepare community members with interest in humanities, history, and veteran affairs to become discussion leaders.

The researchers will lead discussion groups with local, primarily Chamorro and Carolinian, veterans to develop an understanding of war as a shared human experience and the associated cultural heritage of war on Saipan. Discussion will center on the Spanish-Chamorro Wars of the 17th century and the World War II Battle of Saipan as bookends to the history of resistance and aggressions in the islands. These wars were chosen because they represent the complexities of all of the participants of war, combatant and non-combatant, in a colonial and post-colonial context.

Participants will gain an understanding of the meaning of war from different perspectives through the exploration of terrestrial and underwater cultural heritage, film, history, memoirs, children’s historical fiction, poetry, paintings and graphic novels.

“Underwater cultural heritage, just one of many humanities sources used in this project, is not typically thought of as an entry or gateway into discussing large societal issues like identity, conflict or even the potential for healing,” McKinnon said. “This is why I’m so excited to explore this possibility with my colleagues and the community.”

McKinnon, Froula and Ticknor anticipate that the personal interactions with the physical remains of heritage sites as well as humanities texts and films will provide a new or renewed sense of cultural value for both the veterans’ experiences and the local conflict heritage.

NEH panel reviewers commented that the project was distinct from other proposals with significant potential for intergenerational impact. Since launching the initiative in 2014, the NEH has awarded more than $7.7 million for humanities projects that serve veterans or chronicle their experiences.

For more information about maritime studies at ECU, visit http://www.ecu.edu/history/.

For more information about the English department, visit http://www.ecu.edu/english/.

For more information about literacy studies, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/LEHE/read/literacy_home.cfm.

 

 

-by Crystal Baity 

ECU Libraries awarded funding to partner with research faculty on open science

East Carolina University’s 2017-2018 Interdisciplinary Research Awards (IRA) recipients include a collaboration between Joyner and Laupus libraries and the College of Allied Health Sciences.

Interdisciplinary Research Awards (IRA) are seed grants to support interdisciplinary research projects leading to competitive applications for extramural funding.

The project, “Transitioning to Open Science in Research Labs: a partnership between librarians and research faculty,” will explore open science tools for faculty and students to use in the lab, with the ultimate goal of developing an institutional infrastructure to facilitate open science now and in the future at ECU.

Open science is a movement towards making research more accessible to researchers and the public. (contributed photo)

Open science is a movement towards making research more accessible to researchers and the public. (contributed photo)

Open science is a movement towards making research more accessible to researchers and the public. Open science can encompass all aspects of the research process, including open data, open access articles, and even open lab notebooks. Additionally, open science tools can make it easier for researchers to adhere to public access policies required by federal funders.

Scholarly Communication Librarian for Joyner Library Jeanne Hoover and Dr. John Willson from the Department of Physical Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences will serve as primary investigators. The one-year pilot project will be based in the Human Movement Analysis Laboratory at ECU.

“I am looking forward to working with Dr. Willson and colleagues from Laupus Library on exploring ways to use Open Science Framework to help make research more accessible and reproducible,” Hoover said.

Research labs are a key component of teaching and scholarship at academic institutions. Proponents of the open science movement believe that establishing a culture of open science within research labs will drastically improve the exchange of information with the scientific community and general public and as a result, address questions of transparency and research reproducibility.

Co-investigators on the grant include Ting Fu, Laupus liaison to the College of Allied Health Sciences; Roger Russell, assistant director of user services for Laupus Library; and Joseph Thomas, assistant director for collections and scholarly communication for Joyner Library.

“I am very excited about this award, which brings opportunity for exploring Open Science at ECU,” said Fu. “There hasn’t been a project like this before on campus. We hope ours serves as an ice-breaker that will bring change and inspiration to all researchers in the future.”

 

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communication

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber adds “distinguished professor” to his many titles

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber ’14 stays busy.

He is a physician at East Carolina University’s Family Medicine Center, an associate professor of family medicine at the Brody School of Medicine, director of the family medicine residency program and vice chair of academic affairs – plus he is working on his MBA.

(Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber (left) shares a laugh with Max Ray Joyner, Sr. Firnhaber is now the Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professor in Primary Care Medicine.) (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber (left) shares a laugh with Max Ray Joyner, Sr. Firnhaber is now the Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professor in Primary Care Medicine. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Now he is the recipient of the Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professorship in Primary Care Medicine.

“It’s personally an enormous honor. I think it’s a huge plus for our department as well,” Firnhaber said.

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber.

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber.

As the Joyner Distinguished Professor, Firnhaber serves as a role model for ECU faculty members and students. He will assist with activities to enrich teaching, develop opportunities in research and creative activity, provide patient care and boost the reputation of the school and university as a center for primary care medicine.

“Top of the list, we’re working to establish a fellowship in academic medicine, associated with our residency program,” he said. “(We) have all sorts of ideas in mind to improve the research standing of both our department and our residency program, which trickles down to improving the research focus of our students. If our students are seeing their mentors and their teachers participating in research and are working to improve their educational base, that translates to excitement on their part as well.”

Dr. Chelley Alexander, Robert T. Monk Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine, said the professorship “is an enormous honor for Dr. Firnhaber, it reflects well on the department and also supplies funding and opportunities for our department to work with all the primary care disciplines at Brody School of Medicine in joint initiatives centered around research and academic medicine.”

After getting his undergraduate and medical degree from the University of Colorado, Firnhaber spent seven years in the Air Force as a resident and staff physician. Then he spent the next several years in private practice in Shelby, Washington and Chocowinity before coming to ECU in 2006.

ECU and medicine are a family affair. Dr. Firnhaber poses with his daughter, Jessica, who is a student in ECU’s School of Dental Medicine.

ECU and medicine are a family affair. Dr. Firnhaber poses with his daughter, Jessica, who is a student in ECU’s School of Dental Medicine.

Max Ray Joyner, Sr. ’54 described Firnhaber as a “very outstanding fellow” and said he was pleased the school selected him for the professorship.

The Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professorship in Primary Care Medicine is made possible in part by the Joyner family. Their leadership gift has helped fund this professorship since 1992. Joyner has donated many gifts to the university since he graduated, helping with various scholarships and programs. He said the reason he got involved with this professorship is simple.

“I was asked… and I thought it was a good idea,” said Joyner.

“Folks like Mr. Joyner are the absolute unsung heroes of eastern North Carolina,” Firnhaber said. “To me, this professorship is not just an opportunity for me and for our department, but I think it really illustrates what individuals like him have done for health care in our state.”

Firnhaber and the Joyners were honored at a reception at the Family Medicine Center on May 11.

The Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professorship in Primary Care Medicine is a five-year term and is renewable for a second five-year term. It includes an annual stipend that can be used for various needs such as salary supplement, travel and research expenses, stipends for teaching, research assistants, and special equipment.

Max Joyner poses with his family.

Max Joyner poses with his family.

If you would like make a charitable gift to or would like more information for the ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation, email Mark Notestine, President, ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation, notestinem14@ecu.edu.

 

-by Rich Klindworth

College of Education’s Williams receives statewide award

Dr. Thomas “Tom” Williams has received the North Carolina Principal and Assistant Principals’ Association’s (NCPAPA) highest honor – the Ralph Kimel Award.

Dr. Thomas “Tom” Williams. (contributed photo)

Dr. Thomas “Tom” Williams. (contributed photo)

Williams is director for leadership development outreach in East Carolina University’s Department of Educational Leadership. He has served as a developer and facilitator for NCPAPA’s Distinguished Leaders in Practice program. Williams also worked in various administrative roles in the North Carolina public schools for 32 years, including serving as superintendent of Granville County Schools.

Williams, who lives in Raleigh, received his master’s in school administration, education specialist and doctorate of education degrees from ECU.

“Williams has impacted many of our lives,” said Shirley Prince, executive director of the NCPAPA, in an N.C. Association of School Administrators online newsletter. “Many of us had the privilege to work with him, but all of us have benefited from the contributions he has made to education.”

The Ralph Kimel award was established in 1995 to honor the founding member of NCPAPA. The award is given annually to a retired educator who has made a lasting contribution to the profession and association. Williams is the first person from the ECU College of Education to receive the award, which he accepted during the 2017 NCPAPA annual meeting on March 30.

 

 

 

-by Crystal Baity 

 

The Inaugural James H. Bearden Induction Ceremony Welcomes 66 Students to Beta Gamma Sigma

The inaugural James H. Bearden Induction Ceremony was recently held for new members of the ECU College of Business Chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma.

Dr. James H. Bearden. (contributed photos)

Dr. James H. Bearden. (contributed photos)

Dr. James H. Bearden, College of Business Dean Stan Eakins, college faculty and family members celebrated the induction of 66 students and one faculty member into the chapter, which is the honor society serving business programs accredited by AACSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

Donors gave more than $100,000 to the newly created James. H Bearden Endowment Fund, which provided support for this induction ceremony and will help fund future induction ceremonies that will also bear Bearden’s name.

“In honor of Jim’s passion and interest in promoting academic excellence, the new fund will support the efforts of Beta Gamma Sigma,” said Eakins.

The endowment was set up to recognize Bearden’s 56-year career at ECU. He served as the College of Business’ second dean from 1968 to 1983, established the college’s MBA degree and was instrumental in the accreditation of the college’s graduate program.

Bearden also established the Beta Gamma Sigma chapter at ECU and later became that society’s national president.

The spring 2017 Beta Gamma Sigma induction recognized the following:

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, sophomores Agarwal, Ashworth, Bishop, Butz, Drahus, Ervin, Forbes, Georgi, Krause, Kruesi, Ozzimo, Saffer, Potter, Powell, Saffer, Sebastian and Dean Eakins.

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, sophomores Agarwal, Ashworth, Bishop, Butz, Drahus, Ervin, Forbes, Georgi, Krause, Kruesi, Ozzimo, Saffer, Potter, Powell, Saffer, Sebastian and Dean Eakins.

Sophomores
Sumeet Agarwal
Catherine Anne Ashworth
Victoria Bishop
Meredith Butz
Anela Cizmic
Madelyn Craig
Nicholas John Drahus
Malia Elle Ervin
Adam Stephen Forbes
Ronny Georgi
Oakleigh Hogg
Zachary Aaron Kelly
Allison King
Logan Sikes Krause
Dylan Thomas Kruesi
Xin Yin Lin
Shannon Ozzimo
Stavan Patel
Anderson Lee Potter
Hoskins Henry Powell
Kayla Elizabeth Saffer
Ana Sebastian
Gerrit R. Van Staalduinen

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, juniors Cherry, Kube, Micham, Nobles, Roberts, Sherrod, Skorupa, Small, Spain, Strickland, Wood and Dean Eakins.

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, juniors Cherry, Kube, Micham, Nobles, Roberts, Sherrod, Skorupa, Small, Spain, Strickland, Wood and Dean Eakins.

Juniors
Davis Wiley Baker
Emily Rebecca Bowman
Brigid Margaret Burke
Sarah Pearl Cherry
Justin Thomas Delise
Garrett William Hinton
Angus Edward Johnson
Molly Anne Kube
Kate Law
Shelby Nicole Micham
Amber Halle Nobles
Clayton Olson
Faith Roberts
Mary P Sherrod
Lesia Elisabeth Skorupa
Tyler Brian Small
Hudson Spain
Lydia Gayle Strickland
Anthony Vallone
Madisyn Van Ham
Connor Michael Wilson
Sarah Katharine Wood

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, seniors Thirakounh, Paylor, Maye, Correa and Dean Eakins

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, seniors Thirakounh, Paylor, Maye, Correa and Dean Eakins

Seniors
Jessica R Bell
Amber G. Brown
David Michael DeLaney
Diana Maria Garcia Correa
Terry Matias
Stephen Michael Maye
Crystal Irene Merrill
David Hendrick Paylor
Lazaro J. Perez
Hassell Gray Proctor
Tara Elizabeth Royster
Victor Somphet Thirakounh
Emily Anne Tini
Thomas Tyler
Charles Thomas Yorgen

 

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, Nancy Ray, graduate London Paulson and Dean Eakins

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, Nancy Ray, graduate London Paulson and Dean Eakins

Graduates
Jody C Bennett
Paula Suzanne Fisher
London Steele Paulson
Rajeshwar Rajeshwar
Demetrius L. Walker
Shannon Marie Wrigley

Faculty
Nancy Ray

Beta Gamma Sigma membership is the highest recognition a business student can achieve. Two times a year, the College of Business inducts eligible students and faculty into Beta Gamma Sigma. Membership is by invitation only and is based upon eligibility criteria, including those who rank in the top 10 percent of the second-semester sophomore, junior and senior classes, as well as the top 20 percent of graduating graduate students. Before nomination, the entire faculty of the College of Business reviews each candidate to ensure he or she meets the standards of character and integrity that membership represents.

Tina Williams, college faculty, currently serves as the advisor and president of ECU’s Beta Gamma Sigma chapter.

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communication

1 2 3 4 35