ECU nursing professor named AANP fellow

Bobby Lowery, assistant professor and director of the East Carolina University College of Nursing’s Doctor of Nursing Practice Program, has been selected as a 2014 fellow of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

According to the AANP, the purpose of the fellows is to “impact national and global health by engaging recognized nurse practitioner leaders who make outstanding contributions to clinical practice, research, education or policy, enhancing the AANP mission. It is also to provide a forum to extend and enhance fellows’ efforts to mentor and to facilitate leadership development of NPs.”

Lowery will be inducted on June 19 during the AANP 29th National Conference in Nashville, Tenn.

Seven ECU women graduate from BRIDGES Academic Leadership Program

Seven ECU women participated in the UNC BRIDGES XXI academic leadership for women. Pictured at the 2013 BRIDGES graduation are, left to right, Liza Wieland, Cynthia Deale, Qin Ding, Stephanie Coleman, Mary Farwell, Elaine Cabinum-Foeller, and Mandee Lancaster (Contributed photo).

Seven ECU women participated in the UNC BRIDGES XXI academic leadership for women. Pictured at the 2013 BRIDGES graduation are, left to right, Liza Wieland, Cynthia Deale, Qin Ding, Stephanie Coleman, Mary Farwell, Elaine Cabinum-Foeller, and Mandee Lancaster (Contributed photo).

By Qin Ding
Department of Computer Science

Seven East Carolina University women were selected to participate in the UNC BRIDGES leadership program for women, an intensive professional development program for women in higher education who seek to gain or strengthen their academic leadership capabilities.

The selected participants were Elaine Cabinum-Foeller, associate professor of pediatrics and medical director of TEDI BEAR CAC at the Brody School of Medicine; Stephanie Coleman, assistant vice chancellor for operations; Cynthia Deale, professor of hospitality management; Qin Ding, associate professor of computer science; Mary Farwell, director of Undergraduate Research and professor of biology; Mandee Lancaster, director of Survey Research and Leadership Initiatives; and Liza Wieland, professor of English. The program ran from Sept. 6 through Nov. 23, 2013.

During four weekends, 34 participants from public and private institutions in higher education across the state participated in multiple sessions on transformative leadership. While the program helped the participants improve their leadership and communication skills, it also created a strong bond among the participants.

The application for the 2014 program will be open soon in the spring. Additional information about the BRIDGES program can be found at: http://fridaycenter.unc.edu/pdep/bridges/.

 

Albright book chronicles B-1 Band history

ECU English professor Alex Albright was interviewed this month on the WUNC N.C. Public Radio program, “The State of Things,” about his recent book titled “The Forgotten First: B-1 and the Integration of the Modern Navy.” (Hear the interview at http://wunc.org/post/integrating-navy-through-music.)

Alex Albright

Alex Albright

The book details the history of a band of integration pioneers from N.C. A&T University, who were the first African Americans to serve in the modern U.S. Navy at a rank higher than messman’s.

Albright chronicles the history of The B-1 Band, founded in 1942 as the first of more than 100 black WWII Navy bands. Formed from NC A&T students and graduates, the group trained at Norfolk and served at the Navy’s pre-flight school in Chapel Hill and at Pearl Harbor, where they were stationed at the largest posting of African American servicemen in the world.

Previous histories have credited B-1’s historic accomplishment to a different group of sailors who trained at the Great Lakes bases in Chicago. Albright used documents found at the Navy’s national archives at College Park, Md. to support the claim he had heard from the surviving members of B-1 for years.

“Until I found those documents, all we ever had was an oral history,” said Albright. “And the documents I found had never been cataloged.”

“The Forgotten First,” released Oct. 24, has received praise from poet and novelist Fred Chappell, Navy Senior Chief Musician Michael Bayes and retired Navy Masterchief Musician Marshall B. Hawkins. The 196-page book includes 70 photos and illustrations, extensive notes and a bibliography. B-1’s archives, housed in Special Collections at ECU, was the source for many of the book’s images.

Copies are available at Scuppernong Books in Greensboro; UBE in Greenville; Woodside Antiques in Farmville; and at Fountain General Store in Fountain. Copies are also available on Amazon and from R.A. Fountain’s e.store, www.rafountain.com/store. Kindle, Nook, and Lulu editions are forthcoming.

Design for the book was done by former ECU art professor Eva Roberts, award-winning art director of the North Carolina Literary Review from 1991-96. It was printed in Greenville by Morgan Printing.

A review of the book by O Henry magazine, along with an excerpt, is available at http://www.ohenrymag.com/?page_id=25

Albright will participate in a book signing at UBE in Greenville Dec. 21 with B-1 veteran Huey Lawrence.

For additional information, contact Albright at 252-749-7974. For a calendar of events related to the book, visit www.rafountain.com/navy.

 

ECU professor publishes in Journal of Sport Management

stacy headshot2

Dr. Stacy Warner

An article by East Carolina University professor Dr. Stacy Warner in the Department of Kinesiology was published in the September 2013 issue of Journal of Sport Management.

Titled “Examining sense of community in sport: Developing the multidimensional ‘SCS’ scale,” the article discussed the need for an instrument that measures social benefits of sports.  The research was completed with co-authors Dr. Shannon Kerwin of Brock University and Dr. Matthew Walker of Texas A &M University.

The results of this work yielded a valid and reliable 21-item instrument to measure the sense of community experienced in sport setting. According to the researchers, sport organizations often claim that being able to quantify this social benefit is fundamental to justifying the benefits of appropriately managed sport programs or pinpointing weaknesses in its management. Specifically, the instrument assesses Administrative Consideration, Common Interest, Equity in Administrative Decisions, Leadership Opportunity, Social Spaces, and Competition.

Warner’s research interests are in the roles that sport and sport culture play in the lives of individuals through families, communities, work environments and social networks.  This research specifically focuses on organizational structures that optimize community building and development in a way that improves the life quality for athletes.

ECU business faculty report publications

ECU College of Business faculty have reported the following publications:

Article by Tracy Tuten and Christy Ashely, “Do social advergames affect brand attitudes and advocacy?” in the Journal of Marketing Communications.

Article by Shirley Mai with Haozhe Chen and Kenneth Anselmi, “The Role of Returns Management Orientation, Internal Collaboration and Information Support in Reverse Logistics,” in the Journal of Transportation Management.

Velde named chair of the Council on Engagement and Outreach at APLU

Dr. Beth Velde

Dr. Beth Velde

Dr. Beth Velde, director of public service and community relations at East Carolina University, has been named chair of the Council on Engagement and Outreach for the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.

Velde, who served as chair-elect this year, will serve a one-year term as chair in 2014. She was elected during the annual meeting of the APLU held Nov. 10-12 in Washington, D.C. Velde also is a professor of occupational therapy in the ECU College of Allied Health Sciences.

The Council on Engagement and Outreach leads APLU’s efforts in the engagement of its constituent universities with communities. This community engagement focuses on addressing community issues through research, implementation of best practices, education and collaboration. The council works with APLU presidents, commissions and councils and other national organizations focused on community engagement.

The council – one of 10 within the APLU – comprises 14 university administrative and staff leaders responsible for extension, continuing education and public service functions at APLU member institutions and systems.

Key initiatives include developing methods to benchmark community engagement, promoting the scholarship of engagement, honoring national leaders in community engagement, and supporting universities that seek the Carnegie Foundation’s community engagement classification.

Last year, ECU was awarded the APLU’s prestigious C. Peter Magrath University/Community Engagement Award for its establishment and support of the Lucille W. Gorham Intergenerational Community Center. The center partners with West Greenville residents, ECU, the city of Greenville, Pitt Community College and other agencies to provide a comprehensive community-based system of service and care to residents.

The APLU is a research, policy and advocacy organization representing 219 public research universities, land-grant institutions, state university systems and related organizations. It is the nation’s oldest higher education association with member institutions in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and four U.S. territories.

 

ECU research awarded at conference

ECU graduate student Jessica Handloff, mentored by Dr. Christine Avenarious in the Department of Anthropology, received an award for the best research poster in a conference this month at Texas Tech University. (Contributed photos)

ECU graduate student Jessica Handloff, mentored by Dr. Christine Avenarius in the Department of Anthropology, received an award for the best research poster in a conference this month at Texas Tech University. (Contributed photos)

Research completed by faculty and students in ECU’s Department of Anthropology was named the best research poster presented at the Engagement Scholarship Symposium held Oct. 8-9 at Texas Tech University. ECU anthropology graduate student Jessica Handloff, a member of ECU’s Student Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy, designed the poster .

The research displayed on the poster was collected under the guidance of ECU anthropology professor Dr. Christine Avenarius, who developed the project proprosal and assisted Handloff in collecting data. Handloff then designed the poster based on the community engagement aspect of the project. She represented ECU, the Department of Anthropology and SEOSA at the conference.

The poster was titled “Community Participation in Risk Management: Exploring Suitable Adaptations to Storm Water Flooding in Nags Head, N.C.” Research focused on community response and communication styles among stakeholders seeking solutions to the flooding problems.

The SEOSA program for ECU graduate students is part of the ECU Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy, which pairs students with faculty to encourage the scholarship of engagement through workshops and research mentoring programs. For additional information about the academy, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/chancellor/Engagement-and-Outreach-Scholars-Academy.cfm.

Handloff accepts the best research poster award at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium at Texas Tech University.

Handloff accepts the best research poster award at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium at Texas Tech University.

Baxley elected to national medical board

Dr. Elizabeth G. Baxley has been elected to the board of directors of the American Board of Family Medicine.

Baxley

Baxley

Baxley is a professor of family medicine and senior associate dean for academic affairs at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. She will serve the ABFM on the Credentials Committee and the MC-FP (Maintenance of Certification-Family Practice) Committee.

The ABFM is responsible for the board certification of family physicians in the United States.

During her career, Baxley has focused on health care delivery system redesign and teaching about patient safety and quality improvement.

She will serve a five-year term.