Category Archives: History

Abroad in Saipan: Same field school, different perspectives

ECU maritime studies program professor Dr. Jennifer McKinnon and several graduate students traveled to Saipan this summer to conduct archaeological surveys of surrounding waters to locate and document sites related to World War II. McKinnon and the students – including Emily DiBiase and Molly Trivelpiece, who detail some of the experience in personal accounts below – hope their work will lead to identifying possible sites containing the remains of missing servicemen.

This is the fourth and final post from this trip. Read the firstsecond and third posts to learn more about the journey to Saipan and the importance of the trip.

As a first-year maritime studies student with very little dive experience, I came into this field school not knowing what to expect. I had previously participated in land-based archaeological projects during my time as an undergraduate, so I was thinking that it would be similar. I was definitely wrong.

I realized that underwater archaeology is a lot more equipment-intensive than doing the same activities on land, because we were snorkeling or diving instead of just walking around. This may sound self-explanatory, but I had never really considered how much more difficult it would be to move, write and record in the water. Many of us discovered areas where we could improve. The main one for me was using the program Illustrator, which we used to digitize the data that we collected. It takes all kinds of people to make a project go well and recognizing each person’s skills and shortcomings helps.

Students and staff visit the wreck site of a Japanese seaplane named "Emily."

Students and staff visit the wreck site of a Japanese seaplane named “Emily.” (Contributed photos)

Generally, I learned a lot during this field school experience, mostly about how to be a better diver. I came in having only done open water and the American Academy of Underwater Sciences diver classes. This trip allowed me to practice skills while figuring out things on my own, like how to arrange my extra gear so that I could access it easily underwater.

Finally, I learned a lot about the other people in my cohort, which is good because I’ll probably be interacting with them for a long time. I found out new things about each of them and realized that they are a solid group of people. I think we became a better team and figured out how to work with each other during this field school.

Overall, Saipan was a fantastic learning experience where I was given the opportunity to hone my skills as an archaeologist. The island itself was amazing, too  –  from the sites to the food. Though I’m probably not going to eat fish or rice for the rest of the summer.

 

-by Emily DiBiase, graduate student

 


Molly Trivelpiece, right, and Ryan Miranda prepare to dive.

Molly Trivelpiece, right, and Ryan Miranda prepare to dive.

Although Saipan offered new challenges and experiences, I’m no stranger to the maritime archaeology field. The last several summers I worked in Florida, becoming familiar with high temperatures and even higher humidity levels, but the warm clear waters in Saipan were something new to behold. Past experiences with diving had either been in cold or dark water, oftentimes both.

But the biggest hardship for me was to constantly remind myself that I was a student, not a supervisor. For the past three summers, I had been a senior supervisor for a field school that operated very similarly. While part of me reveled in just being a student again and not having the responsibility to plan out the days and monitor students, there were times when it became frustrating and several occasions where my supervisor mindset slipped out.

When dealing with frustrations, however, I had to keep in mind that this project objective was by far the most important aspect of any work I have been a part of. If we were successful in finding or identifying a site, we could be that much closer to bringing closure to the family of a lost WWII service member.

Overall, this was the smoothest field school I have worked on. I think that going into the project with people you have been in class with for the past year really worked in our favor. As a slightly smaller class with only 11 students, we already had a grasp on who worked well together and their strengths or weaknesses. There was also no personal drama, which tends to be a rarity in any field. I cannot wait to continue to learn and work with the rest of the maritime studies program students and see what exciting development comes next for us.

 

-by Molly Trivelpiece, graduate student

Maritime students go from surveying WWII sites underwater to local outreach

ECU maritime studies program professor Dr. Jennifer McKinnon and several graduate students are in Saipan this summer to conduct archaeological surveys of surrounding waters to locate and document sites related to World War II. McKinnon and the students – including Ryan Miranda, who details some of the experience in a personal account below – hope their work will lead to identifying possible sites containing the remains of missing servicemen.

This is the third post from the trip. Read the first and second posts to learn more about the journey to Saipan and the importance of the trip.

Bird Island

Bird Island (Contributed photos)

As we fly on top of the crystal blue waters in the zodiac boat, multiple thoughts run through my head: the plan for the day, my job during the dives and what types of materials we are looking for. Scanning the horizon, I imagine how 74 years ago it would be filled with the huge metal masses of United States Navy ships.

Our field school has been underway for the past few weeks and it’s been an amazing experience. For me, the best way to learn the techniques and methods of the archaeological process has been being in the field or, in our case, on the water. We’ve dived, snorkeled and have become a lean, mean surveying machine.

As the field school progresses, our knowledge and execution of archaeological methods such as six-person snorkel surveys, side scan sonar lines or two-person dive circle searches has improved. We were even able to help conduct surveys with a Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) that was provided and driven by one of our partners.

We also conducted public outreach about our research and the overall mission.

Several maritime students appeared on radio shows, the local news and classmate Joel Cook and I talked to several classes at Kagman High School on the island. Our camaraderie has grown as well. On the boats, we talk, joke and grow closer as a group.

Joel Cook and Ryan Miranda with Kagman High School students. (Contributed photos)

Joel Cook and Ryan Miranda with Kagman High School students.

But while we have been working hard, we also have been taking time to explore Saipan and the massive amount of history here. We have walked into a Japanese bomb bunker, machine gun emplacements, visited Banzai and Suicide Cliffs and looked at the ancient paintings at Kalabera Cave.

Japanese Bomb Magazine where explosives were stored prior to and during the war

Japanese Bomb Magazine, where explosives were stored prior to and during the war

A special treat came on the final day of jumping targets when we finished early and were able to dive at some of the better-known sites on the WWII Maritime Heritage Trail: Battle of Saipan. We were able to explore downed aircraft and shipwrecks and marvel at the amount of preservation. It reminded all of us why we chose this field of study.

As our work turns from being on the water to being behind a computer, we realize how much we have achieved and the area we have covered. Personally, I am amazed and surprised how much we have done.

Looking back, I am thankful for the opportunity to be a part of this field school and the overall mission of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. It allowed us to learn and improve our archaeological skill while serving a greater purpose.

We still may have more to learn but I look forward to the challenges and adventures that are on the way.

 

-by Ryan Miranda, graduate student

 

Read more: Same field school, different perspectives

Graduate students learning to become better archaeologists, divers on Saipan trip

ECU maritime studies program professor Dr. Jennifer McKinnon and several graduate students are in Saipan this summer to conduct archaeological surveys of surrounding waters to locate and document sites related to World War II. McKinnon and the students – including Aleck Tan, who shares below what they already have learned – hope their work will lead to identifying possible sites containing the remains of missing servicemen.

This is the second post from the trip. Read the first post to learn more about the journey to Saipan and the importance of the trip.

Our Saipan field school has been underway for the past few days. Professors and graduate students in the East Carolina University Program in Maritime Studies have settled into a routine. At 7 a.m. each day we travel to our base in Smiling Cove Marina, and then it’s a short boat ride to our project sites in Tanapag Lagoon. We conduct surveys until 3 p.m. then come back to our hotel to de-salt ourselves and post-process data. 

While our ECU team looks like a well-oiled machine now, it took some trial and error to get there. On the first day of conducting a sonar survey, a wave overcame the 7-meter-long black rubber boat and flooded some of our not-so-waterproof computers. Thankfully, there were other computers available to replace the flooded ones. On my first day of conducting a metal detector survey at one of our project sites, my dive buddy and I forgot the necessary 30-meter measuring tape, but instead got a short 15-meter tape, so we had to return to the boat to get the appropriate length tape. Each mistake has taught us what not to do, what to do, and how to do it better.

This field school has been a great learning experience. In a classroom, one can learn all he or she can about how to conduct circle searches or run metal detector surveys, but it is another thing to actually do the work in the ocean where conditions are different. The current moves you away from survey lines, you might get scratched by coral, the sun might beat down harshly on already sunburnt skin, and you might constantly sweat through your shirt and smell like you haven’t washed it in three days. With every challenge, we have learned how to become better archaeologists and divers. Most importantly, the challenges and new experiences have taught us to go with the flow with a bright and shining positive mental attitude.

ECU graduate student Aleck Tan runs a metal detector over an object while Dr. Nathan Richards supervises. (Contributed photo)

ECU graduate student Aleck Tan runs a metal detector over an object while Dr. Nathan Richards supervises. (Contributed photo)

At the end of the day, our team crowds into a makeshift conference room where we talk about our day and plan for the next day. In our meetings, we also talk about another important topic – where to eat dinner. Food has been one of the highlights of the trip as it reminds me of home.

While Saipan is a thousand miles away from my home in North Carolina, it feels like home for me. As a Filipino immigrant, I was born and raised in the Philippines, where afternoon showers, mangoes and water activities are common. Being geographically close to the Philippines, Saipan is similar in weather and even in culture as Saipan has a very close relationship with the Philippines. Since the 16th century, Filipino migrants have been traveling and bringing their culture and food to Saipan.

Being on an island similar to my birthplace has made the study abroad experience easier to adapt to but also more exciting. While work days are long and nights are filled with post-processing, a lot of duct tape, and discussions of people’s spirit animals, our team looks forward to exploring more of Tanapag Lagoon.

 

-by Aleck Tan, graduate student

 

Read more

Third post: Maritime students go from surveying WWII sites underwater to local outreach

Fourth post: Same field school, different perspectives

ECU’s Country Doctor Museum partners with high school students to make history

East Carolina University’s Country Doctor Museum in Bailey teamed up recently with students from Southern Nash High School to help preserve local history.

A student-led oral history event was held for Nash County residents on May 24 as part of an ongoing class project to create a digital history archive for the museum, which is managed as part of the History Collections at ECU’s Laupus Library.

Southern Nash High School juniors Jubie Moss, left, and Robert Hough laugh as they listen to Mike Doss tell a story about a childhood visit to the doctor during an oral history project at the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey, N.C. on Thursday, May 24. (Photos by Rhett Butler)

Southern Nash High School juniors Jubie Moss, left, and Robert Hough laugh as they listen to Mike Doss tell a story about a childhood visit to the doctor during an oral history project at the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey, N.C. on Thursday, May 24. (Photos by Rhett Butler)

“I tell my students there’s a difference between learning history and doing it,” said history teacher Scott Hendricks. “To personally speak with someone instead of reading it out of a book or seeing a video really makes history come alive.”

The students interviewed dozens of local residents about growing up in rural North Carolina during an era when most medical treatments were administered at home.

“I had a lady tell me that she had a cut to the bone and so her mother went and got a bunch of spider webs and packed the wound with them. Then her mother wrapped it with cloth and within three days it was healed,” sophomore Zach Smith said. “Some of these stories sounded strange to us today, but what they did was perfectly normal back then.”

Robert Hough, a junior, said he was surprised to learn that most people who lived in the area during the late 19th and early 20th centuries were from sharecroppers’ families and didn’t have insurance.

“Only one person told me his father had insurance and that was because he worked for a railroad company,” Hough said. “And when people paid their medical bill, it was in cash or they bartered meat or anything the doctor would accept as payment.”

Members of the Bailey community arrive at the Country Doctor Museum to be interviewed by Southern Nash High School students during an oral history project.

Members of the Bailey community arrive at the Country Doctor Museum to be interviewed by Southern Nash High School students during an oral history project.

After the interviews, many participants toured the museum, while others sat on a nearby porch and chatted with students, museum docents and other community members.

For Celia May Glover, the event felt like a homecoming celebration.

“I’ve lived all my life in Bailey. In fact, this place right here is where I grew up,” Glover said, pointing at the floor. “This is my home.”

Glover’s childhood home was repurposed in 1967 as the Country Doctor Museum – America’s oldest museum dedicated to the history of rural health care.

Glover views the polio vaccine as the biggest medical improvement in her lifetime. She recalled a nurse administering the oral vaccine to her as a child by feeding her a sugar cube bearing the live virus.

But what she remembers most about polio is her young neighbor who lived with it.

“She was in an iron lung because that was the only treatment for it back then,” Glover said. “If you were outside, which we were a lot at night, you could hear the noise of the iron lung.”

An oral history project was conducted by South Nash High School at the Country Doctor Museum.

An oral history project was conducted by South Nash High School at the Country Doctor Museum.

Anne Anderson, curator for the Country Doctor Museum, said the oral history project was a great start to the museum’s next 50 years because it will help the museum extend its focus beyond its current collections, which center on the late 19thand early 20th centuries.

“It’s remarkable for the students to have taken the lead with these interviews,” she said. “It’s important for them to hear the memories and stories firsthand, and for them to realize the contribution they are making to their community.”

The students will transcribe the recorded interviews and select portions to include in the museum’s online digital history archives.

Anderson hopes the project is only the beginning of an oral archive documenting the unique aspects of life in eastern North Carolina.

Hendricks said the interaction between the students and the older community members was a highlight of the event.

“Typically that’s not going to happen a lot between the different generations because of their differences with one another,” he said. “History is something everyone can relate to, and in this community, it brings everyone together.”

Edna Mount talks about the scar that was left after receiving the polio vaccine when she was a young girl during an interview at the Country Doctor Museum.

Edna Mount talks about the scar that was left after receiving the polio vaccine when she was a young girl during an interview at the Country Doctor Museum.


-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

Graduate students’ work in Saipan could help with recovery of servicemen MIA after WWII

ECU maritime studies program professor Dr. Jennifer McKinnon and several graduate students are in Saipan this summer to conduct archaeological surveys of surrounding waters to locate and document sites related to World War II. McKinnon and the students – including Jack “Gus” Adamson, who details some of the experience in a personal account below – hope their work will lead to identifying possible sites containing the remains of missing servicemen.

In the early morning hours of May 17, our team of archaeologists, dive safety officers and maritime graduate students gathered at Eller House on the edge of East Carolina University’s main campus. Our gear was checked and loaded and we departed for Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia Beach, Virginia, just as the sun began to break over the horizon announcing a new day. Although a three-hour drive, this would be the first leg of a multiday journey that would take us, quite literally, to the far side of the world ending on the now little-known island of Saipan. Located approximately 1,500 miles south of Japan, Saipan is part of the Marianas Island chain.

In mid-1944, Saipan was the site of one of the most crucial battles of World War II. Its recapture from the Japanese, along with the islands of Guam and Tinian (also in the Marianas), placed Japan within range of newly developed B-29 Superfortress bombers, allowing for strategic bombing of the war industry on the Japanese mainland. Both sides understood the island’s strategic importance and fought bitterly for control of it. The ensuing battle, waged from June 15 to July 9, 1944, resulted in the deaths of approximately 30,000 Japanese and 3,255 Americans. Many of those American servicemen are still unaccounted for and labeled as missing in action (MIA), but they are by no means forgotten. It is that memory that is fueling ECU’s maritime studies summer field school.

As a maritime studies graduate student with aspirations of becoming a conflict archaeologist, this project is particularly exciting for me. Military history and battlefield archaeology have always been a deep passion, and the chance to do a project of this nature is truly once in a lifetime. Further, I have relatives who fought in the Pacific theater and I feel that this brings me much closer to understanding their experiences.

ECU’s maritime studies program is conducting side scan sonar surveys and using underwater metal detection during their field school. (Contributed photo)

ECU’s maritime studies program is conducting side scan sonar surveys and using underwater metal detection during their field school. (Contributed photo)

Partnered with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), which is assisting us in our travel arrangements and numerous other logistics of the project, ECU graduate students guided by our mentors will conduct archaeological surveys of the waters surrounding Saipan in order to locate, record and document sites related to the battle. Hopefully, this will lead to identifying possible sites containing the remains of missing servicemen. Our entire team is humbled and proud to be able to undertake this task that will not only reinforce the archaeological knowledge of this Pacific battlefield, but could also result in the return home of a soldier, sailor or Marine whose family hasn’t received closure after 74 years.

With the weight and pride of this task in our minds, we rolled into Oceana Naval Air Station primed and ready to begin our long journey, only to be told that we must undertake the most difficult of tasks: wait. Our aircraft was down for maintenance and would be unavailable for some time. Murphy’s Law is not the exception but the rule on field projects, and a contingency plan should always be ready. Instead of wasting time on social media or staring at the walls, our team made the short journey to a local museum where, as luck would have it, not only was there an air show of vintage airplanes occurring, but several World War II-era military aircraft were housed there. World War II buffs like me were giddy from being able to study the aircraft and components in person. As an added bonus, some of us were lucky enough to observe an engine test run of a B-25 Mitchell bomber, a rare treat that most can’t claim to have had.

The next leg of our journey finally began on May 19 with our departure for the West Coast before continuing on into the vast blue Pacific Ocean. There will surely be other surprises, but that is part of the adventure!

 

-by Jack “Gus” Adamson, graduate student

 

Read more

Second post: Graduate students learning to become better archaeologists, divers on Saipan trip

Third post: Maritime students go from surveying WWII sites underwater to local outreach

Fourth post: Same field school, different perspectives

Country Doctor Museum celebrates 50 years on April 21

A daylong celebration at the oldest museum in the nation dedicated to the history of rural health care will be held Saturday, April 21.

From 10 a.m. until 3 p.m., the Country Doctor Museum will host “History Alive! A 50thAnniversary Celebration” – a family-friendly event that aims to offer visitors a glimpse into the past. Free activities will include museum tours, a petting zoo and horse-drawn carriage rides from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Acoustic and old-time music will be provided by DryBread Road, and a variety of food vendors will be present.

The Joel Lane House, Imagination Station Science and History Museum, Aycock Birthplace and the Tobacco Farm Life Museum will offer free activities and demonstrations.

The Country Doctor Museum will also showcase a new exhibit, “The Sick Room: Home Comfort and Bedside Necessities,” which illustrates how an extended illness of a family member or loved one was a common part of life at the turn of the 20th century.

The museum, located at 7089 Peele Road in Bailey, is managed as part of the History Collections of Laupus Library at East Carolina University through an agreement with the ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation.

For more information, call 252-235-4165, visit www.countrydoctormuseum.org or visit the Country Doctor Museum Facebook page.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

‘Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine’ explains the disparity of mortality

Quinine bottles on display at Laupus Library (Photos contributed by Laupus Library History Collections)

Quinine bottles on display at Laupus Library (Photos contributed by Laupus Library History Collections)

The American Civil War occurred during a time when medicine was just beginning to make great strides. Contemporary doctors did not fully understand the origin of disease, the importance of hygiene, or the need for sterilized tools during surgery, but discoveries such as anesthesia improved the patient experience immensely.

In North Carolina, the war impacted both civilians and the medical community. Young men joined the war effort as soldiers, doctors joined the ranks to provide medical care, and women stepped up to aid with nursing.

Currently on exhibit through June 3 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of Laupus Library, “Fighting for their Lives: Medical Practices During the American Civil War” examines how doctors and medical staff cared for the soldiers, looking specifically at surgery, disease, infection and the role of hospitals.

“The items on display represent an era of medicine that seems quite foreign to us today,” said Layne Carpenter, Laupus Library history collections archivist. “During this time, anesthesia was fairly new. It was also a common belief that liquor could cure multiple ailments, and amputations were frequent.”

Amputation kit on display at Laupus Library

Amputation kit on display at Laupus Library

“The collection of items tells a story about medicine before people knew what germs were,” she continued. “I think viewers of this exhibit will develop a greater appreciation for modern medicine.”

War deaths from disease did not occur at the same rates across national and racial groups. Almost 17 percent of Confederate soldiers died from disease. In the Union Army, three times more black troops suffered disease deaths than white troops.

The Medical History Interest Group will host “Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine,” presented by Dr. Margaret Humphreys, the Josiah Charles Trent Professor in the History of Medicine at Duke University, on March 26 at 4:30 p.m. in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery.

Humphrey’s talk will explore the ways in which social determinants of health, particularly nutritious food and nursing care, explain much of this differential mortality.

The lecture will be followed by an opening reception for the exhibit. Refreshments will be provided. This event is free and open to the public. This is a Wellness Passport Event.

For more information email hslhistmed@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

National Humanities Medal winner to visit ECU

Rebecca Newberger Goldstein

Rebecca Newberger Goldstein (Photo by Brad DeCecco)

National Humanities Medal winner Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, author of “Plato at the Googleplex” and “The Mind-Body Problem,” will discuss “The Curious Relationship between the Sciences and the Humanities” during an April 23 visit to East Carolina University.

Goldstein’s lecture begins at 7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall Great Room. The event is free and open to the public.

Goldstein is a philosopher and the author of 10 books of both fiction and nonfiction that blend sciences, humanities and the arts. In 1996, she received a MacArthur Fellowship, popularly known as the “Genius Award.”

According to the MacArthur Foundation, “Rebecca Goldstein is a writer whose novels and short stories dramatize the concerns of philosophy without sacrificing the demands of imaginative storytelling.”

In 2014, Goldstein was selected as the National Humanities Medalist, and in 2015, she was awarded the medal by President Barack Obama in a ceremony at the White House.

Goldstein’s visit is co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Great Books Program, Classical Studies and Gender Studies, and the Departments of English, History, Mathematics and Philosophy.

Individuals requesting accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should contact the Department for Disability Support Services at least 48 hours before the event at 252-328-6799 (voice) or 252-328-0899 (TTY).

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

‘North Carolina in the Great War’ now on exhibit in Joyner Library

Excerpt from a page that features a soldier embracing her sweetheart from the Saturday Evening Post.

Excerpt from a page that features a soldier embracing his sweetheart from the Saturday Evening Post. (Photos contributed by Joyner Library.)

Joyner Library is now displaying “North Carolina in the Great War,” a traveling exhibition on loan from the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

The exhibition will be on display until March 25 in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the library’s second floor.

“World War I happened over 100 years ago and may not seem relevant to many people today,” said Charlotte Fitz Daniels, programs and events coordinator for Joyner Library. “We hope the exhibit gives viewers more insight, especially about North Carolina’s role in the Great War. It provides a vast overview of how North Carolina participated both on the front line and on the home front.”

The exhibition includes 10 informational panels and artifacts documenting the state’s wartime efforts including a nurse and soldier uniform.

Artifacts from Joyner Library’s special collections also will be showcased, including nine scrapbook pages from Charlotte native Dorothy Repiton Knox. She began creating the 145-page scrapbook when, as she states, “the boys in our crowd went off to camp in 1917.”

During World War I, Knox worked as a Red Cross volunteer, aiding servicemen at the Southern Railway Station as well as destitute families in the poorest section of the city and surrounding mill villages. Her scrapbook includes letters and mementos that tell the story of her life and her friendships with soldiers and pilots who were stationed briefly at Camp Greene. Dorothy played an important role in assisting at the Red Cross Canteen serving troop trains and caring for flu victims in Mecklenburg County.

Excerpt from Dorothy Repiton Knox’s WWI Scrapbook

Excerpt from Dorothy Repiton Knox’s WWI Scrapbook

The display of excerpts from her scrapbook offers a glimpse into the young woman’s life and the lives of the soldiers she became friends with in Charlotte.

“I found Dorothy Knox’s meticulous documentation in the scrapbook very surprising,” said Fitz Daniels. “She is truly telling a story through the correspondence from soldiers, along with the news clippings and illustrations. The entries gave me a sense of who these people were and how in the midst of war, they still had such a strong wit and sense of humor. It’s evident through the funny letters and cartoons they sent to her.”

A small collection of items from Joyner Library’s Federal Documents Collection, published between 1916-19, are also on display. Included are a number of publications from the Committee on Public Information (CPI), which existed from 1917-19.

Dubbed by historians to be America’s “first ministry of information,” the CPI sought to mobilize American public opinion behind the war effort and to shape media coverage in a pro-government direction. Among the CPI publications on display are pamphlets that denounced German imperialism and real or alleged German war crimes.

Other CPI items discussed the Wilson administration’s war aims and provided basic information on the war. The final report of the 1918-19 Senate Judiciary Subcommittee investigating “Brewing and Liquor Interests and German and Bolshevik Propaganda” is also displayed. Chaired by N.C. Senator Lee Overman, the subcommittee is considered the forerunner of the House Un-American Activities Committee and other congressional bodies tasked with investigating domestic subversion.

“These documents help show how America’s involvement in World War I substantially changed our country,” said David Durant, federal documents and social sciences librarian for Joyner Library. “They are artifacts of both the growth of American nationalism and the increasing role played by the federal government in our society. They show the beginnings of many of the trends that continued through World War II and the early Cold War.”

Another exhibit in the Verona Joyner Langford North Carolina Collection is “North Carolina in the First World War,” featuring a rare volume entitled “Tar Heel War Record.” The collection is located on the third floor of the library.

Joyner Library will hold a reception on Friday, March 2 at 5 p.m. in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery. The reception is open to the public and will coincide with Uptown Greenville First Friday Artwalk. Visit http://uptowngreenville.com/play/artwalk/ to learn more.

Contact Fitz Daniels for more information at 252-328-0287 or fitzdanielsc16@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

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