Category Archives: Joyner Library

Prize-winning author coming to ECU

Author Jim Grimsley will meet with East Carolina University students and read from his best-selling memoir, “How I Learned to Shed My Skin,” on Sept. 22.

Grimsley will speak about his personal experiences growing up during segregation in Jones County at 3:15 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center’s Great Rooms. At 8 p.m., he will read from his memoir at the Greenville Museum of Art, 802 Evans St. 

Grimsley

Grimsley

Grimsley also will announce the winner of the North Carolina Literary Review’s Alex Albright Creative Nonfiction Prize at the Greenville Museum of Art. The winner will receive $250 and their essay will be published in the North Carolina Literary Review (NCLR) in 2017. The prize is named for the publication’s founding editor and funded by the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association.

Both events are free and open to the public and are part of a series of events celebrating the 25th issue of the annual NCLR. Sponsors include ECU’s English and creative writing departments, the NCLR and Greenville Museum of Art.

Grimsley, who is white, combines the story of how Jones County schools were integrated, first by a “Freedom of Choice” desegregation plan and then by federal mandate, with his personal account of how he learned to be a racist while growing up there — and then unlearned those lessons. Black classmates brought into a whites-only school system by integration taught him how to “shed” his racism.

Since 1999, Grimsley has been senior writer in residence at Emory University in Atlanta and is one of 50 active fellows in the Fellowship of Southern Writers. He has won numerous awards and prizes for his writing, including the 2005 Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Lila Wallace/Reader’s Digest Writers Award, the Lambda Literary Award for Fiction, the Asimov Readers’ Award, the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction, and the Bryan Prize for Drama. He has been named Georgia Author of the Year twice.

Grimsley has been an active supporter of the eastern North Carolina literary scene as a participant in the annual literary homecomings that were hosted by ECU for a decade and as a frequent contributor to NCLR. He did most of his background research for “How I Shed My Skin” at ECU’s Joyner Library and was featured at a Greenville Museum of Art reading last December.

Grimsley’s books and the NCLR will be available for purchase at the GMA reading. For more information, contact Alex Albright at 252-328-4876 or the Greenville Museum of Art at 252-758-1946.

–Sophronia Knott

Joyner Library surpasses 1 million visitors during academic year

The Joyner Library at East Carolina University set a new record for attendance with more than one million visits in the past academic year. It is the first time the annual gate count has ever hit the million-visitor mark.

Joyner Library's one millionth visitor

Joyner Library’s one millionth visitor during the 2015-2016 academic year, Josiah Thornton. (Photos by Jay Clark)

“It is particularly remarkable that this threshold was exceeded this year,” said Dr. Jan Lewis, director of Joyner Library. “Despite the construction, the road closings, the changes in bus routes, and the lack of parking.”

Throughout the year Lewis had concerns that construction of the new student center would disrupt normal operations and discourage students from using the library. She credits the hard work of library staff for the increase in attendance.

“It is because of their excellent customer service, student and faculty-centered approach, resources, and work spaces that people are here,” said Lewis. “Thanks to everyone and to our colleagues in housekeeping and facilities for all they do to make Joyner a valued and inviting location.”

Jan Lewis and Josiah Thornton

Jan Lewis, director of Joyner Library, welcomes the library’s one millionth visitor, business student Josiah Thornton.

Josiah Thornton, an undergraduate student in ECU’s College of Business, was the library’s one-millionth visitor.

“The library is a lost treasure at many universities and campuses,” said Thornton. “The library can enrich a student’s total learning experience while offering everything students need in a one-stop shop.

“If we are to compete in a global capacity, we must meet the needs of every student. The library is one part of the university that truly tries to do that.”

Jan Lewis speaks

Jan Lewis, director of Joyner Library, speaks during a celebration of the library’s one millionth visitor.

Mark Sanders, assistant director for public services says that Joyner Library attendance numbers have doubled in the last 17 years.

“Today, the Library welcomes more than twice as many people as attend all of ECU’s home sporting events, combined,” said Sanders. “This doesn’t diminish the importance of athletics, but demonstrates the university community’s commitment to student success and academic production.”

For more information, visit http://www.ecu.edu/lib/.

–Jay Clark

Joyner Library hosting human library event

The Third Annual Human Library event will be taking place on Tuesday, April 12 from 1-4 p.m. in the Faulkner Gallery of Joyner Library.

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This special event allows attendees to check out human beings. Each of the “human books” is pre-selected because they have an interesting life story to share. After attendees choose a human book based on the title and description provided, they are paired with them to have a 10-15 minute conversation.

Topics this year include religion and spirituality, health-related topics, families, and more. The purpose of the event is to open dialog on campus about including people of all beliefs, walks of life, abilities, and backgrounds. This is a Wellness Passport Premiere event; classes are invited to take part in the program, as well. It is free and open to the public.

The Humans of Greenville gallery opening will take place directly afterwards at 4:30 p.m.

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Contact Katy Kavanagh Webb at Joyner Library to learn more: kavanaghk@ecu.edu or 252-328-0734.

In Memoriam – Clyde Thomas ‘Tom the Jazzman’ Mallison

'Tom the Jazzman' Mallison (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

‘Tom the Jazzman’ Mallison
(Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Clyde Thomas “Tom the Jazzman” Mallison of Greenville, a benefactor of Joyner Library who was widely known for his music program on Public Radio East, died Sept. 6. He succumbed from injuries suffered in a car wreck that occurred shortly after he had completed his show on WTEB New Bern. He was 75.

Mallison, who graduated from East Carolina University in 1966 and was SGA president that year, worked at the Du Pont plant in Kinston for 32 years before retiring in 1998. He hosted the Sunday night jazz program on WTEB for more than 30 years. Before he began his show with WTEB, he broadcast with WOOW AM in Greenville and WITN FM.

In 2009, Mallison donated thousands of jazz music albums from his personal collection to Joyner Library. The recordings span a variety of the sub-genres of jazz, including ragtime, Dixieland, bebop, free, and fusion. The collection now resides in the ECU Music Library.

The Alumni Association honored him with its Distinguished Alumni Service Award in 1998 and its Robert Wright Society Leadership Award. He was a former member of the ECU Board of Visitors, a member of the Chancellor’s Society, a member of the College of Education Advancement Council and a former president of the S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series.

He is survived by two children and his wife, Frances Mallison, an ECU graduate who is a retired librarian with the Pitt County Schools.

Memorial contributions may be made to Public Radio East, 800 College Court, New Bern, N.C., or First Presbyterian Church Youth Projects Fund, 1400 S. Elm St., Greenville, N.C.

J.H. Rose High, Tar River Writing Project awarded $20,000 grant

ECUNotes, Tar River 1

J.H. Rose High School teachers Robert Puckett, left, and Scott Wagoner, right, work with Rose students to plan the 3D printing/ prototyping fabrication lab maker space. Contributed photo.

Students and teachers from J.H. Rose High School in Greenville were on ECU’s campus June 15-19 working with staff from the Tar River Writing Project developing plans to implement an idea that earned them a national grant.

The Tar River Writing Project, housed at ECU in the University Writing Program, and Rose High School were one of one of 14 groups in the nation awarded a $20,000 LRNG Innovation Challenge Grant.

During the week, 11 teachers worked with 15 Rose students designing six maker spaces that will operate during Rose’s 80-minute SMART Block period. Maker spaces, sometimes called hackspaces and fablabs, are communities for people to create, invent, learn and share projects.

The maker spaces at Rose will focus on fashion design, robotics/programming, upcycling/repurposing objects, beat making, digital storytelling/media making, and a 3-D/prototype fabrication lab.

Students will be able to visit and explore in these maker spaces during the school’s SMART Block, which allows students to attend academic sessions with teachers or participate in extracurricular activities. Once students find something that they are interested in, they can pick up and follow interest-driven educational pathways, said Stephanie West-Puckett, Tar River Writing Project associate director and a member of the ECU Department of English faculty.

“This grant gives us an opportunity to design innovative educational spaces together that bridge curricular and extracurricular learning,” she said.

During the weeklong event, the educators from ECU and Rose High designed a curriculum with low barriers for easy access and high ceilings for developing mastery. Each maker space will also have a service project so that students and faculty can use the concepts and tools to benefit others in need, West-Puckett said.

“Pop-up maker stations are at the core of what SMART Block should offer students,” said Monica Jacobson, principal at J.H. Rose. “With the stations, Rose students will be afforded time and access to resources that connect and extend their knowledge. Students will be provided with opportunities to build relationships with their peers, teachers, and community partners that share similar interests while they explore beyond the classroom.”

Educators presented the ideas on the last day of the event to school administrators, community members and parents for their feedback.

Will Banks, director of the University Writing Program and of the Tar River Writing Project, noted, “It’s rare that teachers, students, and community members get to work together to find shared interests and passions—and to remember that passion, not test scores, motivates learning.”

The LRNG Innovation Challenge is a new initiative that invests in forward-looking schools and teachers to design innovative projects that take advantage of new technology to support students’ creativity. It is sponsored in partnership with the MacArthur Foundation and John Legend’s Show Me Campaign.

West-Puckett said musician John Legend wants high school students – with projects like the ones funded by the grants – to be able to pursue their interests, especially in the arts, which may not fit into a traditional curriculum approach.

Rob Puckett, a Rose printing and graphics instructor, is working to develop a 3-D printing & prototyping maker space. “While 3-D printing trinkets and toys is neat, we want to demonstrate how these tools can make a real difference in people’s lives,” he said. “Each semester, we’ll work together on printing a custom-made prosthetic hand with free, open-source plans.”

Fellow Rose teacher Lynn Cox, who is collaborating on a maker space for robotics and computer programming, said, “It was great to have the students here with us and see how eager they are for these kinds of opportunities in school.”

ECUNotes, Tar River 2

J.H. Rose High School students and teachers work in groups during a weeklong event in ECU’s Joyner Library to make a pop-up “fabric hacking” maker space. Rose High and the Tar River Writing Project earned a national grant to develop maker spaces and a corresponding curriculum. Contributed photo.

 

Grant will improve access to history collection at ECU’s Laupus Library

A wooden medicine case with 27 medicine vials, 1860-1880.  Photo courtesy The Country Doctor Museum

A wooden medicine case with 27 medicine vials, 1860-1880. Photo courtesy The Country Doctor Museum

A grant from the State Library of North Carolina will aid in improving accessibility to historical archives housed in an East Carolina University library.

The State Library of North Carolina, a Division of the Department of Cultural Resources, awarded a nine-month, $59,200 grant to the Special Collections Division at J.Y. Joyner Library to process the History Collections at the William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library.

The grant is part of the Library Services and Technology Act and is made possible by LSTA grant funding from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal grant-making agency. With matching funds from Joyner Library, the total project exceeds $66,900.

“The purpose of this project is to improve accessibility of the history collections at the Laupus Health Sciences Library,” said Janice S. Lewis, director of Joyner Library. “The Laupus history collections, which consist of over 6,200 monographs, 200 artifacts and a growing number of oral history materials, document the history of medicine and health care in eastern North Carolina.”

The history collections include two distinct categories of material: Laupus Library Archival Collection and the Country Doctor Museum Archival Collection. The Country Doctor Museum archival collection is less than half of the museum’s special collections – the majority of the artifacts are stored at the museum in Bailey, North Carolina.

“The primary focus of this project will be to convert collection guides from Word documents and Excel spreadsheets into encoded archival description finding aids, thus making all collection guides and inventories available online,” said Jennifer Joyner, digital archivist and grant principal investigator. “Currently, there are no online finding aids directing users to these rich and unique collections.”

“The lack of online access to the history collections is in stark contrast to the online accessibility of the manuscript materials at Joyner Library’s special collections division,” Lewis added. “During the 2013-14 year, the finding aids in our East Carolina Manuscript Collection and University Archives received 135,205 page views and were searched over 30,122 times.”

The final step of the project will be to digitize key materials from the Laupus history collections that are representative of the holdings. The digitized materials will become a part of ECU Digital Collections, and item level metadata will be shared with the Digital Public Library of America. The creation of multiple access points will improve the accessibility and visibility of these valuable historical collections.

For more information, contact Dawn Wainwright at (252) 328-4090.

ALA accredits ECU's MLA program

The American Library Association has accredited East Carolina University’s master of library science degree program, the largest producer of school library media coordinators in the state.

ALA_accredited-seal_mediumAs a result of the accreditation, future ECU graduates and recent alumni can apply for positions in any library setting, providing greater flexibility and mobility in career choices, said Dr. John B. Harer, ECU associate professor of library science and master of library science (MLS) program coordinator.

The new designation is seen as essential to MLS graduates seeking employment in academic and public libraries. It is a required standard by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Most employers, except school libraries, require an ALA-accredited master’s for professional level positions, Harer said.

“ALA accreditation will also give students more choices to design a course of study for a specialization in a professional library career,” Harer said. “The program can now build a more dynamic curriculum so that students will be able to choose a specific skill set within the career concentrations of academic and public librarianship.”

ALA accreditation ensures that ECU has undergone a self-evaluation process, been reviewed by peers and meets standards established by the ALA and Committee on Accreditation. Students currently enrolled in the program will receive an accredited degree upon graduation as well as ECU alumni who graduated in 2015, 2014 and 2013.

ECU has been preparing library professionals since 1939. Library science is the largest program in the College of Education. Last fall, 194 students were enrolled.

The online program features high-tech and hands-on learning, providing a web-based course of study using new and emerging technologies. It is designed for students seeking employment as librarians and information professionals in pre-K through 12th grade schools, universities, community colleges and public libraries.

For more information, contact Harer at harerj@ecu.edu or 252-328-4389 or visit the website at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/idp/lsed/index.cfm.

Award-winning author to speak at Joyner Library banquet

Allan Gurganus, acclaimed author of “Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All,” will be the keynote speaker for the Friends of Joyner Library’s annual spring banquet scheduled for 6 p.m., April 30.

Allan Gurganus

Allan Gurganus

Gurganus is also the author of “White People” (Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Pen-Faulkner Finalist), “Plays Well with Others,” “The Practical Heart: Four Novellas” (Lambda Literary Award) and 2013’s “Local Souls.” His stories have won the National Magazine Prize and have been honored in “Best American Stories,” “The O’Henry Prize Collection” and “The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction.”

The writer’s essays and editorials appear in The New York Times and the New York Review of Books. He was featured in the PBS “American Masters” series as a scholar-reader for “Walt Whitman, An American.” Gurganus wrote and narrated the script “A House Divided: Poetry of the American Civil War” for BBC 4.

The CBS version of “Widow” won four Emmys. The writer was a recent John Simon Guggenheim Fellow and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Gurganus has taught literature and writing at Duke University, The Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Stanford University, and Sarah Lawrence College.

“Allan Gurganus is one of our state’s most gifted authors and storytellers,” said Janice Lewis, interim dean of Joyner Library. “I am thrilled that he will share his insights with us. I started reading ‘Local Souls’ last night and was completely captivated by the characters and the town of Falls, North Carolina.”

This year’s banquet will be held at Yankee Hall and the program will honor lifetime Friends of Joyner Library member and library benefactor, the late Ann Rhem Schwarzmann. Tickets may be purchased ($35 members, $45 non-member) at http://tinyurl.com/friendsbanquet or 328-6514.

The Friends of Joyner Library is a non-profit organization that provides support to the library, which serves the university and region.

For more information, contact Dawn Wainwright at 328-4090.

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