Category Archives: Laupus Library

Laupus offers a glimpse into the role of medical workers during war

Nursing uniform from World War I

Nursing uniform from World War I (Photos by Layne Carpenter)

Last year was the 100-year anniversary of the United States’ entry into World War I. Often called the Great War and the War to End All Wars because of the horrific death toll, World War I marked a major transformation in world politics, economics and industries. As warfare technology advanced, medical techniques improved in response.

Many North Carolinians offered their services to the war effort both at home and abroad. Doctors and nurses volunteered to treat the various ailments and injuries in military hospitals and on the battlefront.

Currently on exhibit through March 18 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of Laupus Library, “North Carolina & The Great War: Medical Professionals on the Western Front” offers insight into the work of medical professionals in the war, highlighting the roles of both men and women.

“Laupus Library hopes the exhibit will provide an understanding of medical care during the First World War,” said Layne Carpenter, Laupus Library history collections archivist. “Medical professionals faced many obstacles while on the front because they were treating wounds that they had never seen before.”

Surgical kit used during war

Surgical kit used by medical professionals during war

The exhibit will engage visitors with a display of artifacts, photographs and paper materials to learn about how the medical field responded to new weapon technology.

It features a section about the influenza epidemic of 1918. The worldwide epidemic had a deep impact in North Carolina and later inspired state officials to provide better health care for the state.

A Public Health Collection also is displayed along with a history on how the North Carolina Board of Health educated the public a century ago.

“The interpretative information in this exhibit is really phenomenal,” said Beth Ketterman, library director. “The flu pandemic occurring at the tail end of the war had a very immediate impact here in Pitt County. It’s enlightening to learn how our local community coped with that outbreak at a time when many providers were elsewhere dealing with wartime efforts.”

A reception will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 6 from 4-6 p.m. At 4:30 p.m., local historians will discuss the war’s influence in Pitt County specifically, including stories about local doctors and the influenza epidemic.

This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.

For more information email hslhistmed@ecu.edu.

 

–by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

 

Laupus Library offers guidance on difficult conversations with patients, families

Health care providers are called upon every day to have difficult conversations with patients and family members. When patients become angry or upset, it’s important to know the most effective ways to respond.

A new research guide has been developed by Laupus Library to help providers and staff at East Carolina University quickly access current research on this topic.

“Our goal is to provide the most up-to-date information about a myriad of relevant health care topics,” said Jeff Coghill, director of Eastern AHEC library services. “We make sure these research guides are free, authoritative, widely available and easy to use at both the patient and health care professional level.”

Eastern AHEC Building

Eastern AHEC Building

The guide can be viewed at http://libguides.ecu.edu/TheAngryPatient along with many others posted at http://libguides.ecu.edu/.

Further education and in-person training on this topic is available at an upcoming program this spring offered by Eastern Area Health Education Center (EAHEC), the Office of Continuing Medical Education of the Brody School of Medicine, and the Clinical Skills and Assessment Lab.

Close Encounters of the Medical Kind: Simulation in Difficult Conversations will be held May 18 in the Clinical Skills and Assessment Lab, located on the second floor of the Eastern AHEC building.

Health care providers will have the opportunity to learn and practice effective interpersonal communication skills during emotionally charged encounters with standardized patients. Challenging topics such as opioid prescribing and other scenarios will provide the backdrop for practicing essential communication skills.

Questions about the angry patient research guide may be directed to Jeff Coghill, director of Eastern AHEC library services, at coghillj@ecu.edu.

Questions about the program may be directed to Laura Bliley, assistant director for nursing and allied health education at Eastern AHEC, at blileyl@ecu.edu.

More information about Eastern AHEC may be found at http://easternahec.net/.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications 

 

Laupus Library pampers dedicated scholars

It was a busy time for Laupus Library over the last week as every study room and quiet space was filled with studying students preparing for final exams. From Dec. 5-11 Laupus offered special treats and pampering to the dedicated scholars to help them push through their studies.

Students enjoy breakfast snacks delivered to them by Laupus staff. (contributed photos)

Students enjoy breakfast snacks delivered to them by Laupus staff. (contributed photos)

“Laupus loves our students,” said Beth Ketterman, Laupus Library director. “We know that they are especially dedicated and hard working since they’ve chosen to pursue future health careers, so we do whatever we can to brighten their really intense preparation for exams.”

Forty pizzas, delivered and served to students the evening of the Dec. 5, kicked off the week and kept them fed and fueled for all-night cramming. Because most students hunker down in our study spaces, rarely leaving their chosen spot, Laupus decided to bring the spoils to them.

No hot cocoa is complete without whipped cream.

No hot cocoa is complete without whipped cream.

On several mornings a Laupus Library continental breakfast cart was taken to all study areas of the library, and students were served pastries and other morning snacks.

“I might cry,” said Kaitlin Oward, a first-semester nursing student. “This is the best thing ever.”

Free hot coffee and tea was offered on the library’s reference floor at all hours throughout the week. During the afternoons, a cram cart from ECU Dining Services served students energy bars and healthy refreshments.

A Laupus Library Mug Night was held on Thursday evening and allowed students to choose a keepsake mug to color and take home — but not before filling it up with all the offerings of a hot cocoa bar.

The library’s ongoing pet therapy program, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library and offered to students on several days, was a big success as many students were eager to spend a little time with man’s best friend.

“This is why we are proud to become ECU Pirate nurses,” said Jessie Cooke, a first-semester nursing student. “You guys are awesome for doing this for us.”

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

 

Tinglestad named Laupus Library’s 2017 Friend of the Year

ECU’s Laupus Library recognized Dr. Jon Tingelstad, retired professor and chair of the Department of Pediatrics in the Brody School of Medicine, as its 2017 Friend of the Year during a Nov. 14 awards ceremony at the Hilton Greenville.

The award, given to an outstanding member of the Friends of Laupus Library who demonstrates continued service to and advocacy for the group, has only been given once before, in 2013.

Dr. Jon Tingelstad is presented the 2017 Friend of the Year award by Dr. John Papalas, chair of the Friends of Laupus Library. (contributed photo)

Dr. Jon Tingelstad is presented the 2017 Friend of the Year award by Dr. John Papalas, chair of the Friends of Laupus Library. (contributed photo)

Tingelstad, a member of the Friends board since it was first established in 2009, was also recognized for authoring the book, “ECU Pediactics: The First Quarter Century.

“Jon has been a very committed, long-serving member of our board, and is a highly respected Friend of Laupus Library,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “It was with great pleasure we were able to surprise him with this well-deserved recognition.”

The Friends of Laupus Library provide much needed advocacy and support of the library, the health sciences community and East Carolina University. Friends serve as ambassadors by sharing information about the library’s programs and resources with the community and organizations beyond the library and the university.

Click here for a photo story about Laupus Library and the Friends.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

Laupus Library recognizes 127 health sciences authors

Faculty and staff from across East Carolina University’s Division of Health Sciences gathered in an annual celebration of research and scholarship.

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library held its 12th Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards at the Hilton Greenville on Nov. 14, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library.

“It’s a privilege to host this event to honor the faculty and staff who’ve expanded and enriched the scholarly culture of our university and reputation of the division of health sciences,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “It is truly inspiring to see this breadth of research.”

There were 127 authors honored this year, who published 440 qualified peer-reviewed publications including journal articles, book chapters and other creative works between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017. Twelve books were also published by 10 authors this year.

Dr. Nicholas Benson, Vice Dean for the Brody School of Medicine presents a Laupus medallion to book author, Roger Russell, Assistant Director of User Services for Laupus Library. (Photo by Layne Carpenter)

Dr. Nicholas Benson, Vice Dean for the Brody School of Medicine presents a Laupus medallion to book author, Roger Russell, Assistant Director of User Services for Laupus Library. (Photo by Layne Carpenter)

Dr. Robert Orlikoff, dean for the College of Allied Health Sciences, recognized a record-breaking number of authors and publications from the college since the beginning of the awards program.

“It is so important to recognize our faculty scholars,” said Orlikoff. “We spend a lot of time talking about the importance of maximizing student success but we don’t do enough to recognize that it’s the scholarship and dedication of our faculty that makes student success possible.”

Authors from Laupus Library, the Brody School of Medicine, the College of Nursing and the School of Dental Medicine were also recognized.

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor for the Department of Health Education and Promotion in the College of Health and Human Performance, gave special remarks about the important role of the library’s systematic review services in the advancement of research. Lee has worked closely with Laupus librarians to successfully conduct and complete systematic reviews.

Lee’s work includes documenting health disparities for LGBT people, seeking to understand the origins of those disparities, and identifying and evaluating policy interventions to improve health equity. He also conducts studies of tobacco prevention and control with an eye towards public health policy and reduction of disparities.

“I think it’s perfect that Laupus Library hosts this recognition of scholarly achievements and I think that both in terms of making sure that we have access to the right information and to the skills and services I have access to as a user of the library,” he said.

“As the research enterprise grows at ECU, the library will expand its services to partner with our researchers in disseminating and publishing information,” said Ketterman. “We look forward to expanding the event in years to come to recognize our faculty and staff and their collective efforts to increase the knowledgebase of the health science.”

Registration for the 2017-18 author awards will begin in February. More information about the annual awards ceremony – including a complete listing of this year’s published authors – is available online at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/HSAR/.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communication

Trick or Treat event brings children, families to Laupus Library

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library at East Carolina University held its third annual Health Sciences Trick or Treat event on Oct. 27 throughout the library.

Anne Anderson, curator for the Country Doctor Museum explains how surgical instruments were used long ago. (contributed photos)

Anne Anderson, curator for the Country Doctor Museum explains how surgical instruments were used long ago. (contributed photos)

Attended by over 400 ECU faculty, staff, students and their children, who enjoyed participating a variety of games, crafts and trick-or-treating.

Occupational Therapy Student, Lauren Selingo, enjoys the many creative costumes worn by attendees.

Occupational Therapy Student, Lauren Selingo, enjoys the many creative costumes worn by attendees.

“My four-year-old grandson had such a great time,” said Terrie Hamilton, instructor in the School of Hospitality Leadership. “The Laupus staff did a great job decorating their offices, dressing in costume and spending time with each of the trick-or-treating children. We even appreciated the dental students and their tooth brushes – it gave us a chance to incorporate health care into the experience.”

“This also provided an excellent opportunity for those of us on the main campus to visit the health sciences campus and explore some of what is offered there,” she added. “What a wonderful way to show my grandson that libraries are fun and exciting places.”

A costume contest was also held with the winners announced on Laupus Library’s Facebook page.

The Country Doctor Museum photo booth also offered families a chance to explore spooky archives and pose with some of the items from its collections.

Families pose for photos at the Halloween event.

Families pose for photos at the Halloween event.

To view photos from the event, costume contest and photo booth, visit the Laupus Health Sciences Library at ECU Facebook page at www.facebook.com/eculaupus/.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

 

Laupus Library exhibits “Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection”

Laupus Library is hosting the traveling exhibit “Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection” in the Evelyn Fike Laupus gallery on the fourth floor of the library.

On display from Oct. 23 through Dec. 2, the six-banner exhibit explores a unique archive of 2,588 postcards and over 100 years of images of nurses and the nursing profession from around the world, investigating the hold these images exert on the public imagination — then and now.

The postcard is a fleeting and widespread art form influenced by popular ideas about social and cultural life in addition to fashions in visual style. Nurses and nursing have been the frequent subjects of postcards for over 100 years. In fact, no other art form has illustrated the nursing profession so profusely using such a variety of artistic styles and images.

These images of nurses and nursing are informed by cultural values; ideas about women, men and work; and attitudes toward class, race and national differences. By documenting the relationship of nursing to significant forces in 20th-century life, such as war and disease, these postcards reveal how nursing was seen during those times.

The exhibition highlights only a small selection from the 2,588 postcards of the Zwerdling Postcard Collection, but over 500 more are available to view in the exhibition’s online digital gallery at http://nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/picturesofnursing/digitalgallery.

A “Pictures of Nursing” exhibit reception will be held on Nov. 16 from 4-6 p.m. on the fourth floor of the library and is open to the public. During the program a special collection of nursing artifacts from the Country Doctor Museum will be on display and museum curator Anne Anderson will speak about the history of nursing and healthcare during the early and mid-twentieth century.

“We were really delighted to have been selected as a host site for this exhibit, not only because we like connecting our nursing students and faculty with their profession’s past, but it also allows us a really great opportunity to showcase some of our excellent nursing artifacts from the Country Doctor Museum,” said Beth Ketterman, director for Laupus Library. “It’s a real pleasure whenever we can connect our students with the past in such a tangible way.”

The exhibit is available during operating hours posted at www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/about/hours.cfm, or call 252-744-2219.

The exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and curated by Julia Hallam, PhD.

For more information about the exhibit visit www.nlm.nih.gov/picturesofnursing or contact Kelly Dilda at 252-744-2232 or rogerske@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Comunications

Laupus Library’s exhibited woodcarvings showcase a lifetime of love

Laupus Library opened the art exhibit “Visions in Wood: Carved Creations,” during an Oct. 3 reception in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of the library. On display through Dec. 9, the exhibit showcases a collection of relief carvings by Dr. Leonard “Leo” Trujillo, professor and chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University.

The 2017 fall semester exhibit is part of the library’s ongoing “Art as Avocation” series that showcases and celebrates the artistic talents and self-expression of faculty, staff and students from the Division of Health Sciences.

Dr. Leonard Trujillo (Photos by Michelle Messer)

Dr. Leonard Trujillo (Photos by Michelle Messer)

“Our work as professionals in the health sciences is so demanding and often overwhelming in terms of meeting the demands and expectations for teaching, research and community,” said Trujillo. “But we do all this because we want to meet the needs of our students, almost to the point of not taking time to respect our own. Avocations like mine are truly healing and allows us to give another part of ourselves to others.”

“Laupus is really proud to champion cultural enrichment and the arts on our health sciences campus and so we’re delighted to host Leo’s newest works in our gallery space,” said Laupus Library director Beth Ketterman. “It is clear that between his work as a professor in occupational therapy and as a teacher of carving in his free time, Leo has a commitment to education and sharing his talents with others. We hope that all who come to view his pieces will be inspired by his work.”

Trujillo’s 57-piece exhibition reflects a lifetime of learning the art of carving and love for nature. Each piece represents a personal story of places he’s lived and seen.

Beginning with a solid plank of wood, Trujillo uses mallets and a multitude of gouges, chisels, riffles and sandpaper leaves to transform the wood into lifelike images of trees, old barns, nature scenes and people.

His desire to carve began at an early age. “My dad found this old keepsake oak box that was broken and tossed out,” he said. “On the outside was an applique of two scrolls, one of which had broken off. With a pocket knife I watched him recreate the broken scroll. My mom always talked about how special that box was because he had saved it. From then I felt I should learn how to do that.”

Years later while serving as second lieutenant in the United States Air Force, he continued carving and started to desire more carving tools, although he lacked the funds to pay for them. Old army boots and wooden pipe carvings were in demand among his fellow airmen so he sold them for about $25 each until he made enough money to buy his first set of chisels. Only then would he realize he had to buy something to help sharpen them.

Hunter's lodge art piece. (Photos by Michelle Messer)

Hunter’s lodge art piece. (Photos by Michelle Messer)

Now he has all the tools he could ever need, including a dental tool with actual dental bits used for small detailed carving work. “I had a friend who was a dental hygienist, and they offered me some tools saying these might get into those hard to reach places,” he joked. “If it cuts, I have it or want it.”

When asked how long a piece takes him to carve, he answers with two words. A lifetime. “It takes me a lifetime to finish each one in the sense that every piece is carved with an accumulation of what I’ve learned throughout my life, and I apply all of that to each piece.”

Time is relative, he says, since he begins each morning with a familiar routine which includes almost an hour of carving time just before going to work. When he returns home at the end of the day, every spare moment is filled with more carving. “Carving time is just a part of my day,” he said. “If I ever felt like it was work I’d probably stop doing it.”

Trujillo’s plans for the future as an artist includes auctioning some of his work to raise money for ACES for Autism and developing a web page to share options for commissioned work that will surely broaden his list of admirers.

“This series means so much to me because it recognizes my carvings as “Works of Art” and me as an artisan, not a hobbyist,” he said. “I am honored beyond words.”

Laupus Library also wishes to thank the Friends of Laupus Library for their continued support of the Art as Avocation series and opening reception.

Laupus Library is currently seeking artists for both 2018 exhibitions. To learn more about the series or to showcase your work, visit www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/events/artasavocation or contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications 

Laupus Library to exhibit relief woodcarving creations

Laupus Library will open the art exhibit “Visions in Wood: Carved Creations,” on Oct. 3 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of the library. On display through Dec. 9, the exhibit showcases a collection of relief carvings by Dr. Leonard “Leo” Trujillo, professor and chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University.

The 2017 fall semester exhibit is part of the library’s ongoing “Art as Avocation” series that showcases and celebrates the artistic talents and self-expression of faculty, staff and students from the Division of Health Sciences.

“Laupus has a long history of showcasing the hidden talents of our health sciences faculty in this series,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “Dr. Trujillo’s work is masterful and our hope is that those who view these pieces will gain an appreciation for his craft and expertise, and reflect on how the process of creation gives us insights into our own humanity.”

Log cabin by Dr. Leonard Trujillo. (contributed photo)

Log cabin by Dr. Leonard Trujillo. (contributed photo)

Trujillo’s work is reflective of a lifetime of learning the art of carving and love for nature. He recounts his desire at an early age to carve figures out of wood to create three-dimensional illusions in his works.

He will sometimes carve a piece only to study a certain aspect of the carving process. Beginning with a solid plank of wood, Trujillo uses mallets and a multitude of gouges, chisels, riffles and sandpaper leaves, to transform the wood into lifelike images of trees, old barns, nature scenes and once in a while, people.

“The hardest part of the carving process is having to stop and prepare the wood for the work that you are about to do,” he said. “That can take days out of actual carving time.”

In 2013, he built his first studio, doing all but the electrical work. Filled with sharpening machines, vacuum systems, special track lighting and carving gouges lined throughout the multi-stage workspace, it’s easy to see this is far from a getaway spot. He also refuses for it to be referred to as a “man cave.”

“I carve because of the pleasure it brings me, and truly take delight in the way people react to my work,” he said.

Presently, Trujillo isn’t competing in carving club shows and competition. “When you work towards winning a ribbon, you lose the pleasure of carving and it becomes work rather than pleasure,” he said.

An opening reception will be held on Oct. 3 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. and will include a presentation by the artist. The event is open to the public.

To learn more about this exhibition series or if you are interested in showcasing your work, visit

www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/events/artasavocation.

For more information contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

-by Kelly Dilda, University Communications 

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