Category Archives: Laupus Library

Laupus Library to exhibit relief woodcarving creations

Laupus Library will open the art exhibit “Visions in Wood: Carved Creations,” on Oct. 3 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of the library. On display through Dec. 9, the exhibit showcases a collection of relief carvings by Dr. Leonard “Leo” Trujillo, professor and chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University.

The 2017 fall semester exhibit is part of the library’s ongoing “Art as Avocation” series that showcases and celebrates the artistic talents and self-expression of faculty, staff and students from the Division of Health Sciences.

“Laupus has a long history of showcasing the hidden talents of our health sciences faculty in this series,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “Dr. Trujillo’s work is masterful and our hope is that those who view these pieces will gain an appreciation for his craft and expertise, and reflect on how the process of creation gives us insights into our own humanity.”

Log cabin by Dr. Leonard Trujillo. (contributed photo)

Log cabin by Dr. Leonard Trujillo. (contributed photo)

Trujillo’s work is reflective of a lifetime of learning the art of carving and love for nature. He recounts his desire at an early age to carve figures out of wood to create three-dimensional illusions in his works.

He will sometimes carve a piece only to study a certain aspect of the carving process. Beginning with a solid plank of wood, Trujillo uses mallets and a multitude of gouges, chisels, riffles and sandpaper leaves, to transform the wood into lifelike images of trees, old barns, nature scenes and once in a while, people.

“The hardest part of the carving process is having to stop and prepare the wood for the work that you are about to do,” he said. “That can take days out of actual carving time.”

In 2013, he built his first studio, doing all but the electrical work. Filled with sharpening machines, vacuum systems, special track lighting and carving gouges lined throughout the multi-stage workspace, it’s easy to see this is far from a getaway spot. He also refuses for it to be referred to as a “man cave.”

“I carve because of the pleasure it brings me, and truly take delight in the way people react to my work,” he said.

Presently, Trujillo isn’t competing in carving club shows and competition. “When you work towards winning a ribbon, you lose the pleasure of carving and it becomes work rather than pleasure,” he said.

An opening reception will be held on Oct. 3 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. and will include a presentation by the artist. The event is open to the public.

To learn more about this exhibition series or if you are interested in showcasing your work, visit

www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/events/artasavocation.

For more information contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

-by Kelly Dilda, University Communications 

Laupus Library exhibits “Fire and Freedom: Food and Enslavement in Early America”

Laupus Library is hosting the traveling exhibit “Fire and Freedom: Food and Enslavement in Early America” in the Evelyn Fike Laupus gallery on the fourth floor of the library.

On display from Aug. 28 through Oct. 7, the six-banner exhibit looks at the Chesapeake region, where European settlers relied upon indentured servants, Native Americans and African slave labor for life-saving knowledge of farming and food acquisition, and to gain economic prosperity.

By examining the labor of slaves and food practices of the time, including those at George Washington’s Mount Vernon, the exhibition explores how power was exchanged between and among different peoples, races, genders and classes during the early colonial era.

“I’m really excited that Laupus was selected to host this exhibit, primarily because eastern North Carolina is situated adjacent to the Chesapeake region and so this history hits close to home,” said Beth Ketterman, interim director of Laupus Library. “We’ll be able to supplement the panels and digital materials with artifacts and archival materials from our collection which I think will add an important dimension for our visitors.”

An online version of the exhibition available at www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/fireandfreedom/exhibition0.html features a range of resources for educators and students, including two lesson plans developed for elementary and high school courses, a higher education module for undergraduate and graduate students and instructors, online activities, and a compilation of online resources. In addition, it offers a digital gallery of 18th-century materials on food, botany, health and housekeeping from the NLM collection.

The exhibit is available during operating hours posted at www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/about/hours.cfm, or call 252-744-2219.

The exhibition was brought to you by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

For more information contact Kelly Dilda at 252-744-2232 or rogerske@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly Dilda, University Communications

New director of Laupus Health Sciences Library announced

East Carolina University’s Board of Trustees approved the appointment of Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman as the new director of ECU’s William Laupus Health Sciences Library during a special called meeting Friday, Aug. 25.

Ketterman is an associate professor and has served as interim director of Laupus Library since November 2015. She has worked in various positions within ECU’s libraries for 16 years and will begin her new role Sept. 1.

“I am excited and humbled by the opportunity to lead the Laupus Library, particularly at this time in our university’s history as we seek to grow the research enterprise,” said Ketterman. “Laupus will contribute meaningfully to those efforts by innovating our services and collections in response to our faculty and students’ health-related information needs.”

Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

As director, Ketterman will oversee library operations and services, including those of the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey, N.C. She currently serves on several committees at ECU including the Medical and Health Sciences Foundation Board and Discovery Advisory Board.

“Ms. Ketterman is an accomplished researcher and administrator and brings a wealth of experience to the role as director of the William Laupus Health Sciences Library,” said Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor for the Division of Health Sciences at ECU.

Ketterman received her undergraduate degree from the College of William & Mary and a master’s degree in library science from North Carolina Central University. She is an American Association of Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) Fellow and received a leadership scholarship from the organization in 2015. She was also a recipient of the Medical Library Association Daniel T. Richards MLA Collection Development award.

Ketterman’s research efforts include 23 combined publications, articles and presentations in the arena of library science with a focus on collection development, electronic health information awareness, and implementation of electronic resources and technology in medical science libraries.

 

-by Jamie Smith

ECU’s Laupus Library makes science, history and medicine fun for kids

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library at East Carolina University hosted “Potion Power: Medicinal Herb Discoveries for Kids” on July 19 for nearly 100 children and parents as part of a botanical exhibit from ECU’s Country Doctor Museum.

Microscope station participants. (Photos by Michelle Messer)

Microscope station participants. (Photos by Michelle Messer)

On display in the library’s fourth floor gallery, “Nature’s Remedies: Traditions of Botanical Medicine,” explores the history of using herbs and other plants as remedies and preventatives and showcases objects used by ordinary consumers, druggists and medical practitioners in their search for relief and well-being.

“We were really overwhelmed by the attendance and positive response from the families who came out for our event,” said Beth Ketterman, interim director of Laupus Library. “The kids all seemed really excited by the interactive stations and the chance to talk with our experts about the plants they were viewing and handling.”

During the afternoon, attendees visited the exhibit and participated in hands-on learning and exploration stations including one where they made dream pillows using traditional medicinal herbs and mortars and pestles. An old-fashioned pharmacy station required them to use math skills, play dough and antique pill rollers to fill prescriptions. At the microscope station, they discovered a wide range of plant and animal cells up close. And finally, they were given a chance to color historic botanical drawings from the pages of the oldest coloring book in the world.

Kent and John fill a prescription using an antique pill roller.

Kent and John fill a prescription using an antique pill roller.

A team of Country Doctor Museum curators and staff from Laupus Library’s History Program offered attendees a brief history of the medicinal practices presented at each station and answered questions about health care needs in the past.

Live leeches, antique bloodletting tools, and a large collection of artifacts were also brought in from the Country Doctor Museum for the day as part of an educational demonstration for everyone.

Seven-year-old attendee Jason Sturz, who wants to be a paleontologist one day, said his favorite station was the microscopes and slides. “They are the coolest because they show everything up close,” he said. “That’s way easier than trying to catch a bug and look at it through a magnifying glass.”

Jason’s mother, Sarah Sturz said her children are homeschooled so she’s always looking for something educational and fun for them to attend. “Jason likes to talk to people and we’re working on social skills so I figured this was a good educational opportunity for him,” she explained. “He loved it.”

Alice Barber, age ten, found out about the event through ECU’s Campus Recreation Wellness Summer Camp she attends each week. She said she’s interested in science and medicine because she wants to be a veterinarian when she grows up. “I like the library,” she said. “It has so much cool stuff to learn about.”

“We will definitely pursue more events of this nature in the future,” said Ketterman. “The library and our museum have a lot more in our collections to inspire these kids, who all have the potential to be the next great leaders in healthcare.”

The exhibit will be on display until Aug. 21.

For more information about the event please contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda

ECU’s Laupus Library to host “Potion Power: Medicinal Herb Discoveries for Kids”

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library at East Carolina University will host “Potion Power: Medicinal Herb Discoveries for Kids” on July 19 from 2-4 p.m. in the library’s 4th-floor gallery as part of a botanical exhibit from ECU’s Country Doctor Museum.

Currently on display, “Nature’s Remedies: Traditions of Botanical Medicine,” explores the history of using herbs and other plants as remedies and preventatives. From botanical oils and apothecary tins to rhubarb and ginger, the exhibit showcases objects used by ordinary consumers, druggists and medical practitioners in their search for relief and well-being.

Laupus invites children ages eight and up and their parents to visit the exhibit and participate in an afternoon of hands-on learning and exploration.

Kids will use a mortar and pestle to make dream pillows. (contributed photo)

Kids will use a mortar and pestle to make dream pillows. (contributed photo)

“We’re really excited to share the history of medicine in a fun way with kids from the community,” said Beth Ketterman, interim director of Laupus Library. “Eastern NC has a rich history of providing health care to our community and the kids who come to the event will learn how our doctors in the region used to make medicine in ‘the good old days.’”

During the afternoon, kids will visit several activity stations. One stop will allow them to make dream pillows using traditional medicinal herbs and mortars and pestles. An old fashioned pharmacy station will require them to use math skills, play dough and antique pill rollers to fill prescriptions. At the microscope station, they will discover plant cells up close where they can compare dandelion fuzz to a carrot root. Lastly, kids will be able to show off their creativity with a chance to color historic botanical drawings from the pages of the oldest coloring book in the world.

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is not required. Light refreshments will be provided.

Parking passes will be available to all attendees upon arrival. Guests are required to park in “B-Zone” parking lots during the event.

For more information about the event please contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

ECU Libraries awarded funding to partner with research faculty on open science

East Carolina University’s 2017-2018 Interdisciplinary Research Awards (IRA) recipients include a collaboration between Joyner and Laupus libraries and the College of Allied Health Sciences.

Interdisciplinary Research Awards (IRA) are seed grants to support interdisciplinary research projects leading to competitive applications for extramural funding.

The project, “Transitioning to Open Science in Research Labs: a partnership between librarians and research faculty,” will explore open science tools for faculty and students to use in the lab, with the ultimate goal of developing an institutional infrastructure to facilitate open science now and in the future at ECU.

Open science is a movement towards making research more accessible to researchers and the public. (contributed photo)

Open science is a movement towards making research more accessible to researchers and the public. (contributed photo)

Open science is a movement towards making research more accessible to researchers and the public. Open science can encompass all aspects of the research process, including open data, open access articles, and even open lab notebooks. Additionally, open science tools can make it easier for researchers to adhere to public access policies required by federal funders.

Scholarly Communication Librarian for Joyner Library Jeanne Hoover and Dr. John Willson from the Department of Physical Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences will serve as primary investigators. The one-year pilot project will be based in the Human Movement Analysis Laboratory at ECU.

“I am looking forward to working with Dr. Willson and colleagues from Laupus Library on exploring ways to use Open Science Framework to help make research more accessible and reproducible,” Hoover said.

Research labs are a key component of teaching and scholarship at academic institutions. Proponents of the open science movement believe that establishing a culture of open science within research labs will drastically improve the exchange of information with the scientific community and general public and as a result, address questions of transparency and research reproducibility.

Co-investigators on the grant include Ting Fu, Laupus liaison to the College of Allied Health Sciences; Roger Russell, assistant director of user services for Laupus Library; and Joseph Thomas, assistant director for collections and scholarly communication for Joyner Library.

“I am very excited about this award, which brings opportunity for exploring Open Science at ECU,” said Fu. “There hasn’t been a project like this before on campus. We hope ours serves as an ice-breaker that will bring change and inspiration to all researchers in the future.”

 

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communication

Laupus Library celebrates scholarship in health sciences

Faculty and staff from across East Carolina University’s Division of Health Sciences recently gathered for an annual celebration of research and scholarship.

Dr. Leigh Cellucci, professor in Health Services & Information Management, receives the Laupus Bronze for authoring a book this year. (Photo by Kelly Dilda)

Dr. Leigh Cellucci, professor in Health Services & Information Management, receives the Laupus Bronze for authoring a book this year. (Photos by Kelly Dilda)

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library held its 11th Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards at the Hilton Greenville on Nov. 15, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library. Laupus is “proud to be a partner in the research and publication process,” noted Elizabeth Ketterman, interim director.

“It is inspiring to see the breadth of research that occurs in the division over a year’s time,” she added.

There were 114 authors honored this year, who contributed to nearly 375 journal articles, book chapters, books and other creative works between July 2015 and June 2016.

Book author Dr. Laura Gantt, associate dean for nursing support services, is congratulated by Vice Chancellor Phyllis Horns.

Book author Dr. Laura Gantt, associate dean for nursing support services, is congratulated by Vice Chancellor Phyllis Horns.

“Every year we do this we have a longer and longer list of faculty and staff who are fully engaged in the work of the university,” remarked Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor for health sciences.

Dr. Nicholas Benson, interim dean of the Brody School of Medicine, applauded authors’ “effort to share your knowledge and generate wisdom…to make a real difference in the wellness of eastern North Carolina, from Murphy to Manteo, and across the nation and world.”

It was College of Allied Health Sciences Dean Dr. Robert Orlikoff’s first appearance at the event, having arrived at East Carolina this fall from a prior leadership post at West Virginia University.

“The reason that ECU exists is for our students…and how our students represent the future,” he said. “But this event focuses attention on our talented faculty who make all of that (learning) possible. Their scholarship is directly tied to the student experience, and advancing health care and transforming the region.”

Authors from Laupus, the ECU College of Nursing and the School of Dental Medicine were also recognized.

Registration for the 2016-17 author event will begin in February. More information about the annual awards ceremony – including a complete listing of this year’s published authors – is available online at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/HSAR/.

Dr. R. Todd Watkins and Dr. Geralyn Crain, both faculty in ECU's School of Dental Medicine, enjoy this year’s Author Recognition Awards Ceremony. (Photo by Peggy Novotny)

Dr. R. Todd Watkins and Dr. Geralyn Crain, both faculty in ECU’s School of Dental Medicine, enjoy this year’s Author Recognition Awards Ceremony. (Photo by Peggy Novotny)

 

–Kathryn Kennedy

Medical Library Association recognizes Forbes for outstanding service

Laupus Library Interlibrary Loan Supervisor Carrie Forbes is the recipient of the 2016 Mid-Atlantic Chapter (MAC) Award for Outstanding Health Sciences Library Paraprofessional from the Medical Library Association (MLA). The award honors Forbes for her outstanding customer service efforts related to her work in interlibrary loan and document delivery for Laupus Library.

Forbes

Forbes (contributed photo)

“I am humbled and honored to receive this award and had no idea I was even nominated,” said Forbes. “I truly love working at Laupus Library and serving the ECU Health Sciences Campus and Vidant Medical Center by being able to provide Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery services for our patrons.”

The purpose of the MLA-MAC Outstanding Health Sciences Library Paraprofessional of the Year Award is to honor an outstanding library paraprofessional in a health sciences library and to recognize the critical role and important contributions library paraprofessionals make to the development and evolution of modern health sciences libraries and librarianship.

“Laupus Library is very fortunate to have many dedicated and talented staff,” says Roger Russell, Assistant Director for User Services. “I am elated that the MLA-MAC funds this award and that Carrie was chosen to receive it this year.”

–Kelly Dilda

Laupus Library offers respites for stressed students

Final exam week is the busiest time for Laupus Library each semester, as students pack into every available study space for hours of studying. To encourage students to take a healthy break from their hard work, Laupus hosted a variety of stress relieving activities and programs April 26-29 for those needing a brief escape.

The library’s ongoing Pet Therapy program, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library, kicked off the week with much success as many students were eager to spend a little time with man’s best friend.

Health Sciences students take a break from studying for exams to engage in some pet therapy – part of an expanding student program sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library. (Contributed photos)

Christa Sanderford, a graduate student in the environmental health sciences program, was talking on the phone about exams with her mom when she walked into the library and spotted the therapy dogs. “I was like, ‘mom I have to go,’” she said. “There are dogs in the library!”

“I am so excited,” she gushed after giving both dogs a good rub. “My exam is in 30 minutes and I am so much more cheerful now.”

“Bringing these dogs to the library is a way we can acknowledge that we appreciate what these students are going through and provide a bit of emotional comfort, particularly during finals week when the stress goes up another notch, explained Beth Ketterman, interim director of Laupus Library. “And there is good evidence in the health sciences literature that taking a few moments to stop and pet an animal has a positive impact on human psychology and physiology.”

Physician assistant studies student Hayden Mulligan says she spends more time in the library than her own home.

“Sometimes it’s hard to incentivize yourself to take a break because there is so much work to be done,” she said. “It’s so nice to be able to take a second away from studying and love on an animal that is sweet and generous and cuddly.”

“These dogs help me remember there is real life outside of school,” she continued. “They relax me and make the library feel a little more like home.”

Because of the positive response from students, the Friends of Laupus Library voted earlier this year to double the number of offerings by sponsoring sessions for fall and spring semesters during mid-term and final exam weeks.

Friends Chair John Papalas says the group is proud to support the library and students it serves.

“By sponsoring and promoting events like this we hope to highlight the prominent role Laupus plays in the education of a growing and ever more diverse student body,” he said.

Other activities held throughout the week included a Food N’ Fun Break on Wednesday evening for students who enjoyed free pizza, snacks, giveaways and board games. Also during the break, students completed surveys which collected feedback on ways the library can improve services to better meet their needs.

Programs concluded on Friday, April 29, as Laupus VIP contest winner Brittany Eure – a freshman nursing student – and four invited friends received 12 hours of private and reserved study space and a full day of pampering. Free breakfast, lunch, and dinner were delivered to the lucky group along with snacks and other giveaways throughout the day.

Laupus staff also decorated the exclusive spot to make the long study hours a more enjoyable experience.

“Winning the contest has made a huge difference in my studying,” claimed Eure. “I actually looked forward to coming to study today and was relieved not to have to worry about finding a room.”

The competition, created to encourage students to follow the library’s social media sites, required students to attend the Food N’ Fun Break and post a photo from the event on the Laupus Library Facebook or Instagram pages. Participant names were entered into a drawing held on Thursday morning.

“All these programs show the library cares about the students and wants to make this time as manageable as possible for us,” Mulligan said. “That makes me feel like they are on my team and I really appreciate their support.”

–Kelly Dilda

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