Category Archives: Laupus Library

Laupus Library heartens students through their hardest trials

Students love donuts. Especially this one who thanked Laupus with a cool Instagram post.

Students love donuts. Especially this one who thanked Laupus with a cool Instagram post.

Today you can almost hear a pin drop over the soft hum of computers and a muted conversation between two staff members in Laupus Library. What a drastic contrast the space was to what only days earlier had been a busy hub of student activity as they filled every study room, carrel and quiet space to study.

Laupus Library successfully championed another class of students through final exams.

Sarah Eagle, a junior in the College of Nursing, said one of the reasons she comes to Laupus to study is because of its size. “It’s a bit smaller and there are more people here in the same field. If you have a question, most of the time someone close by studying is usually in the same major and can help.”

“Plus, I feel like the people who work here care about us,” she said. “Like this morning, there were a bunch of donuts upstairs.”

A bunch indeed; in fact 300 donuts were devoured by students on reading day and it was a close call for Finley, a 2-year-old Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, whose sweet kisses and rubs were consumed by the same group.

The paws of pet therapy dog, Finley rarely touched the floor during his visit to the library. Instead he spent most of his time in the arms of students who needed a little comfort and had a hard time putting him down.

The paws of pet therapy dog, Finley rarely touched the floor during his visit to the library. Instead he spent most of his time in the arms of students who needed a little comfort and had a hard time putting him down. (Photos by Michelle Messer and Kelly Rogers Dilda)  

Later that evening Argos, an American Staffordshire Terrier, visited students who also needed a quick break for some pet therapy and puppy love.

“I come to this library purposely during finals week because of the crafts and snacks they plan,” said Margaret Barry, graduating senior in the College of Nursing. “It makes us feel better, like we are being looked after and not forgotten during the hard times. Some of us are struggling, so the ‘Hey, we are looking out for you,’ and the ‘We want you to do well,’ support means a lot.”

Chancellor and Mrs. Cecil Staton walked through every floor of the library to personally distribute cookies to every student and offer kind words of guidance and encouragement.

Chancellor and Mrs. Cecil Staton walked through every floor of the library to personally distribute cookies to every student and offer kind words of guidance and encouragement.

On Thursday, April 26, Chancellor and Mrs. Cecil Staton made a special visit to the library and delivered cookies and coffee, and interacted with students during their stay.

Barry said the visit showed her the chancellor cares about everyone’s individual success. “There are like 30,000 students at ECU but he and Mrs. Staton took their time at this library to single everybody out, and to shake our hands and say hello,” she said.

“He was very personable and kind and seemed interested in our futures. He also asked about our plans for jobs. To make the effort to come all the way over to this side of the campus was really nice.”

Megan Sands, graduating senior in the College of Nursing, said the words of encouragement by Chancellor and Mrs. Staton mean a lot. “I’ve noticed that they do take their time, several times throughout the semester, to really get to know the students and interact with us.”

Some students seemed a bit starstruck to meet the chancellor for the first time.

Some students seemed a bit starstruck to meet the chancellor for the first time.

“It shows that they are trying to get to know us and not just fulfill their duties to the university but also to the students. The mood and energy in the library is a lot lighter just from this interaction.”

Twenty-five pizzas were delivered and served to students later that evening and kept them fueled for all-night cramming.

ECU Dining Services’ CRAMcart made a few stops at the library throughout the week and offered free healthy snack options to students. And Campus Recreation and Wellness staff from the Division of Student Affairs hosted a day of wellness on the library’s second floor.

A coloring station and other calming activities were offered to those who needed a quick break, and one last visit from Argos helped push students through to the end.

Laupus also presented extra boosts to support the endurance needed for long study hours by offering free healthy and savory snacks each day.

“Laupus Library shows that they care about our well-being, especially during finals when mental health is something that is very important,” said Sands. “There is a lot of stress; we are all worried about passing our finals, getting good grades, and it shows that they are thinking about us when we aren’t even thinking about ourselves.”

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

Laupus Library demonstrates how to care for cultural heritage

Layne Carpenter, archivist from Laupus Library history collections removes tape from a book in the preservation lab. (Photo contributed by Laupus Library History Collections)

Layne Carpenter, archivist from Laupus Library History Collections removes tape from a book in the preservation lab. (Contributed photo)

Would you like to learn about caring for your family’s heirlooms? Join Laupus Library’s History Collections staff on April 16-19 for a series of demonstrations about preserving artifacts and manuscripts.

“This is a great opportunity for the history collections department to share what we do with our students, faculty and staff, and the community,” said Layne Carpenter, history collections archivist. “We are excited to demonstrate how we care for collection materials to ensure they last well into the future.”

Learn more about book preservation, caring for photographs, digitizing items for the database, performing conservation on artifacts and archival materials, packing and storing family heirlooms, and more. Handouts and supplemental materials will be available each day.

  • Monday, April 16: Book preservation demonstrations will be held from 2-4 p.m.
  • Tuesday, April 17: Photograph and digital file preservation demonstrations will be held from noon-4 p.m.
  • Wednesday, April 18: Artifact and archive demonstrations will be held from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Thursday, April 19: Packing and storing family heirloom demonstrations will be held from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Demonstrations will be given on the second floor of Laupus Library near the main entrance.

“On Thursday we encourage people to bring in their small to medium-sized family heirlooms,” said Justin Easterday, collections manager. “That day we will offer information and tips on how to best store items of sentimental or historical value along with contact information for local conservators who can address more serious issues concerning keepsakes.”

Laupus Library will also be accepting artifact donations next week. “If you have a medically-themed artifact that is taking up space in your house, attic or garage, bring it by for an assessment and join our list of donors that help us preserve the medical history of North Carolina.”

For directions and parking information, visit http://www.ecu.edu/csdhs/laupuslibrary/about/Maps.cfm.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

Laupus Library’s leadership worthy of national celebration

This week, Laupus Library joins libraries nationwide in celebrating the many ways libraries lead our communities through the transformative services, programs and expertise they offer.

April 8-14 is National Library Week, an annual celebration of the life-changing work of libraries, librarians and library workers. Libraries aren’t just places to borrow books or study — they’re also creative and engaging community centers where people can collaborate using new technologies and develop their skills and passions.

“The History of PTSD: How Cultural Narratives Affect the Patient Experience” will be held at 4:30 p.m. April 9. (Contributed by Laupus Library)

“We promote our scholarship at a national level,” said Beth Ketterman, Laupus Library director. “Our library employees lead through active service in regional, state and national library associations. Next month, we have librarians speaking at the Medical Library Association on innovative ways we’ve transformed our collection development practices to best meet the needs of our university patrons. Our archivist, Layne Carpenter, relayed some of her interpretive expertise and practices at a recent Society of N.C. Archivists meeting.”

Ketterman said Laupus leads ECU’s Division of Health Sciences by introducing new services. One recent example is the launch of a systematic review service that provides authoritative and exhaustive searches for investigators in the health sciences.

“Our librarians conduct the searches and supply the literature search methodology for published reviews, and receive authorship credit for this very important partnership in the research process.”

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor for the Department of Health Education and Promotion in the College of Health and Human Performance, recently completed a published review using the library’s service.

“Our collaboration with the systematic review service at Laupus provided information critical to the Food and Drug Administration’s regulation of vaping (or e-cigarette) retailers,” he said.

“Our systematic review, which is published in Tobacco Control, was only possible with the expertise and collaboration of a librarian. This service is indispensable given the ever growing volume of scientific literature and the need to leverage high-quality scientific evidence to improve the health of the public.”

Also a leader in the provision of resources to support the division and area health practitioners, the library selects and ensures efficient access to thousands of journals, books and other resources.

“A unique and growing part of our collection is our anatomical models; in fact, we have the largest collection of these models of all health sciences libraries in the state, and that is due to Laupus’ responsiveness to student need,” said Ketterman.

As part of the celebration, the library is hosting free programs and exhibits during the week and into the later part of April.

An opening reception for art exhibit “Eye Rain and Heart Cramps” will be held from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 10. (Contributed by Laupus Library)

An opening reception for “Eye Rain and Heart Cramps” will be held from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 10. (Contributed by Laupus Library)

On Monday, April 9 the Medical History Interest Group lecture, “The History of PTSD: How Cultural Narratives Affect the Patient Experience,” presented by Dr. Sheena M. Eagan, assistant professor in the Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies, will be held at 4:30 p.m. in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery located on the fourth floor of Laupus Library.

On Tuesday, April 10 an opening reception will be held for art exhibit “Eye Rain and Heart Cramps” from 4:30-6:30 p.m. in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of the library. On display through June 1, the exhibit showcases a collection of paintings and mixed media artworks by April Holbrook, administrative support specialist for clinical financial services in the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. The art exhibit is part of the library’s ongoing Art as Avocation series that explores artistic talents of faculty and staff from the health sciences.

On exhibit throughout the week in the fourth floor gallery is “Fighting for their Lives: Medical Practices During the American Civil War.” The exhibit examines how doctors and medical staff cared for soldiers, looking specifically at surgery, disease, infection and the role of hospitals. Items on display represent an unrecognizable era of medicine when amputations were common and anesthesia was fairly new.

The following week of April 16-20, Laupus will celebrate National Preservation Week with a variety of daily activities and demonstrations offered on the second floor of the library. Students and patrons will have the opportunity to learn more about book preservation, digitizing and photographing artifacts for the database, performing conservation on artifacts and archival materials, packing and storage of family heirlooms, and more about cultural heritage. Handouts and supplemental materials will be available each day.

Finishing out the month, the Country Doctor Museum will celebrate its 50th anniversary on Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with “History Alive! A 50thAnniversary Celebration” – a family-friendly event that aims to offer visitors a glimpse into the past. Free activities will include museum tours, a petting zoo and horse drawn carriage rides from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Country Doctor Museum will offer horse drawn carriage rides as part of its 50th anniversary celebration. (Contributed by the Country Doctor Museum)

The Country Doctor Museum will offer horse drawn carriage rides as part of its 50th anniversary celebration. (Contributed by the Country Doctor Museum)

Acoustic and old-time music will be provided by DryBread Road, and a variety of food vendors will be present. The Aurora Fossil Museum, Joel Lane House, Imagination Station Science and History Museum, Aycock Birthplace and the Tobacco Farm Life Museum will offer free activities and demonstrations.

The Country Doctor Museum will also showcase a new exhibit, “The Sick Room: Home Comfort & Bedside Necessities,” which illustrates how an extended illness of a family member or loved one was a common part of life at the turn of the 20thcentury.

Opened in 1968, The Country Doctor Museum shares the history of medicine in rural America and is managed as part of the History Collections of Laupus Library. It is the oldest museum in the United States dedicated to the history of America’s rural health care and is located in Bailey, N.C.

“None of what we do would be possible without the advocacy and commitment from our Friends of the Laupus Library,” said Ketterman. “The Friends promote the library and ensure that we have funds to enrich these programs and student-focused events when we wouldn’t otherwise be able to.”

Chairman of the Friends of Laupus Library Dr. John Papalas said, “As a Brody School of Medicine alumnus, I know how instrumental Laupus Library was to my success as well as the class of 2006. By being involved with the Friends, my support helps Laupus to continue to serve a growing health sciences division.”

Read more about the Friends in a photo story at https://spark.adobe.com/page/DoKdK0nuMj46g/.

First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April.

For more information about Laupus Library, The Country Doctor Museum and the Friends of Laupus Library, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

‘Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine’ explains the disparity of mortality

Quinine bottles on display at Laupus Library (Photos contributed by Laupus Library History Collections)

Quinine bottles on display at Laupus Library (Photos contributed by Laupus Library History Collections)

The American Civil War occurred during a time when medicine was just beginning to make great strides. Contemporary doctors did not fully understand the origin of disease, the importance of hygiene, or the need for sterilized tools during surgery, but discoveries such as anesthesia improved the patient experience immensely.

In North Carolina, the war impacted both civilians and the medical community. Young men joined the war effort as soldiers, doctors joined the ranks to provide medical care, and women stepped up to aid with nursing.

Currently on exhibit through June 3 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of Laupus Library, “Fighting for their Lives: Medical Practices During the American Civil War” examines how doctors and medical staff cared for the soldiers, looking specifically at surgery, disease, infection and the role of hospitals.

“The items on display represent an era of medicine that seems quite foreign to us today,” said Layne Carpenter, Laupus Library history collections archivist. “During this time, anesthesia was fairly new. It was also a common belief that liquor could cure multiple ailments, and amputations were frequent.”

Amputation kit on display at Laupus Library

Amputation kit on display at Laupus Library

“The collection of items tells a story about medicine before people knew what germs were,” she continued. “I think viewers of this exhibit will develop a greater appreciation for modern medicine.”

War deaths from disease did not occur at the same rates across national and racial groups. Almost 17 percent of Confederate soldiers died from disease. In the Union Army, three times more black troops suffered disease deaths than white troops.

The Medical History Interest Group will host “Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine,” presented by Dr. Margaret Humphreys, the Josiah Charles Trent Professor in the History of Medicine at Duke University, on March 26 at 4:30 p.m. in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery.

Humphrey’s talk will explore the ways in which social determinants of health, particularly nutritious food and nursing care, explain much of this differential mortality.

The lecture will be followed by an opening reception for the exhibit. Refreshments will be provided. This event is free and open to the public. This is a Wellness Passport Event.

For more information email hslhistmed@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

Laupus Library exhibit shares stories of human emotion

Laupus Library will open the art exhibit “Eye Rain and Heart Cramps” with a 4:30-6:30 p.m. opening reception on April 10 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of the library.

On display through June 1, the exhibit showcases a collection of paintings and mixed media artworks by April Holbrook, administrative support specialist for clinical financial services in the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University.

The 2018 spring semester exhibit is part of the library’s ongoing Art as Avocation series that showcases and celebrates the artistic talents and self-expression of faculty, staff and students from the Division of Health Sciences.

Artist April Holbrook’s collection offers relatable connections between artistic expression and human emotion. (Contributed photo)

Artist April Holbrook’s collection offers relatable connections between artistic expression and human emotion. (Contributed photo)

“Art is my therapy,” said Holbrook. “I feel as if every soul on this earth is here to leave some mark on the world and I feel my purpose was to create things to make others feel like they are not alone.”

“April’s works are truly stunning,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “I am so grateful that she’s willing to share these pieces with us for the exhibit, not only because they convey a range of emotion and experiences that are relatable, but also because she elevates the mediums in which she chooses to work. She’s got a rare talent and Laupus is proud we are able to exhibit on her behalf.”

Born in Durham as a first-generation American after her family immigrated from Germany in the early 1970s for the pursuit of higher education, Holbrook’s mother attended Duke University and later became a cardiologist, and her father worked as the bank president. While neither of her parents were fine artists and never understood what they referred to as a “waste of time,” her grandmother loved to draw and fully supported Holbrook’s dream to become an artist.

Holbrook later attended the University of the North Carolina School of the Arts and graduated from Portland State University with a bachelor of fine arts degree in social art and a minor in graphic design.

Holbrook’s paintings and mixed media artworks are created with a variety of mediums including pencil, sharpie, watercolor and acrylic.

Absorbing the tradition of remembrance art into her collection, she uses daily life as the subject matter for her pieces. Stories about life’s challenges, the innocence of childhood and the loss of that innocence with the coming of age are shared through her paintings to express the relatable experiences of everyday people.

Her hope is that visitors of the 12-piece exhibit will find a piece of themselves somewhere in this story of human emotion.

“At times in our life the spark for the things we love goes out and is rekindled by a great opportunity,” said Holbrook. “I give the deepest of thanks to Laupus Library for relighting that spark and allowing others to witness a part of me, my love for art and my world through this deeply personal collection.”

The Friends of Laupus Library supports the Art as Avocation series and reception.

Laupus Library is currently seeking artists for 2018-2019 exhibitions. To learn more about the series or to showcase your work, visit www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/events/artasavocation or contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

Laupus offers a glimpse into the role of medical workers during war

Nursing uniform from World War I

Nursing uniform from World War I (Photos by Layne Carpenter)

Last year was the 100-year anniversary of the United States’ entry into World War I. Often called the Great War and the War to End All Wars because of the horrific death toll, World War I marked a major transformation in world politics, economics and industries. As warfare technology advanced, medical techniques improved in response.

Many North Carolinians offered their services to the war effort both at home and abroad. Doctors and nurses volunteered to treat the various ailments and injuries in military hospitals and on the battlefront.

Currently on exhibit through March 18 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of Laupus Library, “North Carolina & The Great War: Medical Professionals on the Western Front” offers insight into the work of medical professionals in the war, highlighting the roles of both men and women.

“Laupus Library hopes the exhibit will provide an understanding of medical care during the First World War,” said Layne Carpenter, Laupus Library history collections archivist. “Medical professionals faced many obstacles while on the front because they were treating wounds that they had never seen before.”

Surgical kit used during war

Surgical kit used by medical professionals during war

The exhibit will engage visitors with a display of artifacts, photographs and paper materials to learn about how the medical field responded to new weapon technology.

It features a section about the influenza epidemic of 1918. The worldwide epidemic had a deep impact in North Carolina and later inspired state officials to provide better health care for the state.

A Public Health Collection also is displayed along with a history on how the North Carolina Board of Health educated the public a century ago.

“The interpretative information in this exhibit is really phenomenal,” said Beth Ketterman, library director. “The flu pandemic occurring at the tail end of the war had a very immediate impact here in Pitt County. It’s enlightening to learn how our local community coped with that outbreak at a time when many providers were elsewhere dealing with wartime efforts.”

A reception will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 6 from 4-6 p.m. At 4:30 p.m., local historians will discuss the war’s influence in Pitt County specifically, including stories about local doctors and the influenza epidemic.

This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.

For more information email hslhistmed@ecu.edu.

 

–by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

 

Laupus Library offers guidance on difficult conversations with patients, families

Health care providers are called upon every day to have difficult conversations with patients and family members. When patients become angry or upset, it’s important to know the most effective ways to respond.

A new research guide has been developed by Laupus Library to help providers and staff at East Carolina University quickly access current research on this topic.

“Our goal is to provide the most up-to-date information about a myriad of relevant health care topics,” said Jeff Coghill, director of Eastern AHEC library services. “We make sure these research guides are free, authoritative, widely available and easy to use at both the patient and health care professional level.”

Eastern AHEC Building

Eastern AHEC Building

The guide can be viewed at http://libguides.ecu.edu/TheAngryPatient along with many others posted at http://libguides.ecu.edu/.

Further education and in-person training on this topic is available at an upcoming program this spring offered by Eastern Area Health Education Center (EAHEC), the Office of Continuing Medical Education of the Brody School of Medicine, and the Clinical Skills and Assessment Lab.

Close Encounters of the Medical Kind: Simulation in Difficult Conversations will be held May 18 in the Clinical Skills and Assessment Lab, located on the second floor of the Eastern AHEC building.

Health care providers will have the opportunity to learn and practice effective interpersonal communication skills during emotionally charged encounters with standardized patients. Challenging topics such as opioid prescribing and other scenarios will provide the backdrop for practicing essential communication skills.

Questions about the angry patient research guide may be directed to Jeff Coghill, director of Eastern AHEC library services, at coghillj@ecu.edu.

Questions about the program may be directed to Laura Bliley, assistant director for nursing and allied health education at Eastern AHEC, at blileyl@ecu.edu.

More information about Eastern AHEC may be found at http://easternahec.net/.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications 

 

Laupus Library pampers dedicated scholars

It was a busy time for Laupus Library over the last week as every study room and quiet space was filled with studying students preparing for final exams. From Dec. 5-11 Laupus offered special treats and pampering to the dedicated scholars to help them push through their studies.

Students enjoy breakfast snacks delivered to them by Laupus staff. (contributed photos)

Students enjoy breakfast snacks delivered to them by Laupus staff. (contributed photos)

“Laupus loves our students,” said Beth Ketterman, Laupus Library director. “We know that they are especially dedicated and hard working since they’ve chosen to pursue future health careers, so we do whatever we can to brighten their really intense preparation for exams.”

Forty pizzas, delivered and served to students the evening of the Dec. 5, kicked off the week and kept them fed and fueled for all-night cramming. Because most students hunker down in our study spaces, rarely leaving their chosen spot, Laupus decided to bring the spoils to them.

No hot cocoa is complete without whipped cream.

No hot cocoa is complete without whipped cream.

On several mornings a Laupus Library continental breakfast cart was taken to all study areas of the library, and students were served pastries and other morning snacks.

“I might cry,” said Kaitlin Oward, a first-semester nursing student. “This is the best thing ever.”

Free hot coffee and tea was offered on the library’s reference floor at all hours throughout the week. During the afternoons, a cram cart from ECU Dining Services served students energy bars and healthy refreshments.

A Laupus Library Mug Night was held on Thursday evening and allowed students to choose a keepsake mug to color and take home — but not before filling it up with all the offerings of a hot cocoa bar.

The library’s ongoing pet therapy program, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library and offered to students on several days, was a big success as many students were eager to spend a little time with man’s best friend.

“This is why we are proud to become ECU Pirate nurses,” said Jessie Cooke, a first-semester nursing student. “You guys are awesome for doing this for us.”

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

 

Tinglestad named Laupus Library’s 2017 Friend of the Year

ECU’s Laupus Library recognized Dr. Jon Tingelstad, retired professor and chair of the Department of Pediatrics in the Brody School of Medicine, as its 2017 Friend of the Year during a Nov. 14 awards ceremony at the Hilton Greenville.

The award, given to an outstanding member of the Friends of Laupus Library who demonstrates continued service to and advocacy for the group, has only been given once before, in 2013.

Dr. Jon Tingelstad is presented the 2017 Friend of the Year award by Dr. John Papalas, chair of the Friends of Laupus Library. (contributed photo)

Dr. Jon Tingelstad is presented the 2017 Friend of the Year award by Dr. John Papalas, chair of the Friends of Laupus Library. (contributed photo)

Tingelstad, a member of the Friends board since it was first established in 2009, was also recognized for authoring the book, “ECU Pediactics: The First Quarter Century.

“Jon has been a very committed, long-serving member of our board, and is a highly respected Friend of Laupus Library,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “It was with great pleasure we were able to surprise him with this well-deserved recognition.”

The Friends of Laupus Library provide much needed advocacy and support of the library, the health sciences community and East Carolina University. Friends serve as ambassadors by sharing information about the library’s programs and resources with the community and organizations beyond the library and the university.

Click here for a photo story about Laupus Library and the Friends.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

1 2 3