Category Archives: Laupus Library

Trick or Treat event brings children, families to Laupus Library

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library at East Carolina University held its third annual Health Sciences Trick or Treat event on Oct. 27 throughout the library.

Anne Anderson, curator for the Country Doctor Museum explains how surgical instruments were used long ago. (contributed photos)

Anne Anderson, curator for the Country Doctor Museum explains how surgical instruments were used long ago. (contributed photos)

Attended by over 400 ECU faculty, staff, students and their children, who enjoyed participating a variety of games, crafts and trick-or-treating.

Occupational Therapy Student, Lauren Selingo, enjoys the many creative costumes worn by attendees.

Occupational Therapy Student, Lauren Selingo, enjoys the many creative costumes worn by attendees.

“My four-year-old grandson had such a great time,” said Terrie Hamilton, instructor in the School of Hospitality Leadership. “The Laupus staff did a great job decorating their offices, dressing in costume and spending time with each of the trick-or-treating children. We even appreciated the dental students and their tooth brushes – it gave us a chance to incorporate health care into the experience.”

“This also provided an excellent opportunity for those of us on the main campus to visit the health sciences campus and explore some of what is offered there,” she added. “What a wonderful way to show my grandson that libraries are fun and exciting places.”

A costume contest was also held with the winners announced on Laupus Library’s Facebook page.

The Country Doctor Museum photo booth also offered families a chance to explore spooky archives and pose with some of the items from its collections.

Families pose for photos at the Halloween event.

Families pose for photos at the Halloween event.

To view photos from the event, costume contest and photo booth, visit the Laupus Health Sciences Library at ECU Facebook page at www.facebook.com/eculaupus/.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

 

Laupus Library exhibits “Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection”

Laupus Library is hosting the traveling exhibit “Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection” in the Evelyn Fike Laupus gallery on the fourth floor of the library.

On display from Oct. 23 through Dec. 2, the six-banner exhibit explores a unique archive of 2,588 postcards and over 100 years of images of nurses and the nursing profession from around the world, investigating the hold these images exert on the public imagination — then and now.

The postcard is a fleeting and widespread art form influenced by popular ideas about social and cultural life in addition to fashions in visual style. Nurses and nursing have been the frequent subjects of postcards for over 100 years. In fact, no other art form has illustrated the nursing profession so profusely using such a variety of artistic styles and images.

These images of nurses and nursing are informed by cultural values; ideas about women, men and work; and attitudes toward class, race and national differences. By documenting the relationship of nursing to significant forces in 20th-century life, such as war and disease, these postcards reveal how nursing was seen during those times.

The exhibition highlights only a small selection from the 2,588 postcards of the Zwerdling Postcard Collection, but over 500 more are available to view in the exhibition’s online digital gallery at http://nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/picturesofnursing/digitalgallery.

A “Pictures of Nursing” exhibit reception will be held on Nov. 16 from 4-6 p.m. on the fourth floor of the library and is open to the public. During the program a special collection of nursing artifacts from the Country Doctor Museum will be on display and museum curator Anne Anderson will speak about the history of nursing and healthcare during the early and mid-twentieth century.

“We were really delighted to have been selected as a host site for this exhibit, not only because we like connecting our nursing students and faculty with their profession’s past, but it also allows us a really great opportunity to showcase some of our excellent nursing artifacts from the Country Doctor Museum,” said Beth Ketterman, director for Laupus Library. “It’s a real pleasure whenever we can connect our students with the past in such a tangible way.”

The exhibit is available during operating hours posted at www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/about/hours.cfm, or call 252-744-2219.

The exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and curated by Julia Hallam, PhD.

For more information about the exhibit visit www.nlm.nih.gov/picturesofnursing or contact Kelly Dilda at 252-744-2232 or rogerske@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Comunications

Laupus Library’s exhibited woodcarvings showcase a lifetime of love

Laupus Library opened the art exhibit “Visions in Wood: Carved Creations,” during an Oct. 3 reception in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of the library. On display through Dec. 9, the exhibit showcases a collection of relief carvings by Dr. Leonard “Leo” Trujillo, professor and chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University.

The 2017 fall semester exhibit is part of the library’s ongoing “Art as Avocation” series that showcases and celebrates the artistic talents and self-expression of faculty, staff and students from the Division of Health Sciences.

Dr. Leonard Trujillo (Photos by Michelle Messer)

Dr. Leonard Trujillo (Photos by Michelle Messer)

“Our work as professionals in the health sciences is so demanding and often overwhelming in terms of meeting the demands and expectations for teaching, research and community,” said Trujillo. “But we do all this because we want to meet the needs of our students, almost to the point of not taking time to respect our own. Avocations like mine are truly healing and allows us to give another part of ourselves to others.”

“Laupus is really proud to champion cultural enrichment and the arts on our health sciences campus and so we’re delighted to host Leo’s newest works in our gallery space,” said Laupus Library director Beth Ketterman. “It is clear that between his work as a professor in occupational therapy and as a teacher of carving in his free time, Leo has a commitment to education and sharing his talents with others. We hope that all who come to view his pieces will be inspired by his work.”

Trujillo’s 57-piece exhibition reflects a lifetime of learning the art of carving and love for nature. Each piece represents a personal story of places he’s lived and seen.

Beginning with a solid plank of wood, Trujillo uses mallets and a multitude of gouges, chisels, riffles and sandpaper leaves to transform the wood into lifelike images of trees, old barns, nature scenes and people.

His desire to carve began at an early age. “My dad found this old keepsake oak box that was broken and tossed out,” he said. “On the outside was an applique of two scrolls, one of which had broken off. With a pocket knife I watched him recreate the broken scroll. My mom always talked about how special that box was because he had saved it. From then I felt I should learn how to do that.”

Years later while serving as second lieutenant in the United States Air Force, he continued carving and started to desire more carving tools, although he lacked the funds to pay for them. Old army boots and wooden pipe carvings were in demand among his fellow airmen so he sold them for about $25 each until he made enough money to buy his first set of chisels. Only then would he realize he had to buy something to help sharpen them.

Hunter's lodge art piece. (Photos by Michelle Messer)

Hunter’s lodge art piece. (Photos by Michelle Messer)

Now he has all the tools he could ever need, including a dental tool with actual dental bits used for small detailed carving work. “I had a friend who was a dental hygienist, and they offered me some tools saying these might get into those hard to reach places,” he joked. “If it cuts, I have it or want it.”

When asked how long a piece takes him to carve, he answers with two words. A lifetime. “It takes me a lifetime to finish each one in the sense that every piece is carved with an accumulation of what I’ve learned throughout my life, and I apply all of that to each piece.”

Time is relative, he says, since he begins each morning with a familiar routine which includes almost an hour of carving time just before going to work. When he returns home at the end of the day, every spare moment is filled with more carving. “Carving time is just a part of my day,” he said. “If I ever felt like it was work I’d probably stop doing it.”

Trujillo’s plans for the future as an artist includes auctioning some of his work to raise money for ACES for Autism and developing a web page to share options for commissioned work that will surely broaden his list of admirers.

“This series means so much to me because it recognizes my carvings as “Works of Art” and me as an artisan, not a hobbyist,” he said. “I am honored beyond words.”

Laupus Library also wishes to thank the Friends of Laupus Library for their continued support of the Art as Avocation series and opening reception.

Laupus Library is currently seeking artists for both 2018 exhibitions. To learn more about the series or to showcase your work, visit www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/events/artasavocation or contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications 

Laupus Library to exhibit relief woodcarving creations

Laupus Library will open the art exhibit “Visions in Wood: Carved Creations,” on Oct. 3 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of the library. On display through Dec. 9, the exhibit showcases a collection of relief carvings by Dr. Leonard “Leo” Trujillo, professor and chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University.

The 2017 fall semester exhibit is part of the library’s ongoing “Art as Avocation” series that showcases and celebrates the artistic talents and self-expression of faculty, staff and students from the Division of Health Sciences.

“Laupus has a long history of showcasing the hidden talents of our health sciences faculty in this series,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “Dr. Trujillo’s work is masterful and our hope is that those who view these pieces will gain an appreciation for his craft and expertise, and reflect on how the process of creation gives us insights into our own humanity.”

Log cabin by Dr. Leonard Trujillo. (contributed photo)

Log cabin by Dr. Leonard Trujillo. (contributed photo)

Trujillo’s work is reflective of a lifetime of learning the art of carving and love for nature. He recounts his desire at an early age to carve figures out of wood to create three-dimensional illusions in his works.

He will sometimes carve a piece only to study a certain aspect of the carving process. Beginning with a solid plank of wood, Trujillo uses mallets and a multitude of gouges, chisels, riffles and sandpaper leaves, to transform the wood into lifelike images of trees, old barns, nature scenes and once in a while, people.

“The hardest part of the carving process is having to stop and prepare the wood for the work that you are about to do,” he said. “That can take days out of actual carving time.”

In 2013, he built his first studio, doing all but the electrical work. Filled with sharpening machines, vacuum systems, special track lighting and carving gouges lined throughout the multi-stage workspace, it’s easy to see this is far from a getaway spot. He also refuses for it to be referred to as a “man cave.”

“I carve because of the pleasure it brings me, and truly take delight in the way people react to my work,” he said.

Presently, Trujillo isn’t competing in carving club shows and competition. “When you work towards winning a ribbon, you lose the pleasure of carving and it becomes work rather than pleasure,” he said.

An opening reception will be held on Oct. 3 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. and will include a presentation by the artist. The event is open to the public.

To learn more about this exhibition series or if you are interested in showcasing your work, visit

www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/events/artasavocation.

For more information contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

-by Kelly Dilda, University Communications 

Laupus Library exhibits “Fire and Freedom: Food and Enslavement in Early America”

Laupus Library is hosting the traveling exhibit “Fire and Freedom: Food and Enslavement in Early America” in the Evelyn Fike Laupus gallery on the fourth floor of the library.

On display from Aug. 28 through Oct. 7, the six-banner exhibit looks at the Chesapeake region, where European settlers relied upon indentured servants, Native Americans and African slave labor for life-saving knowledge of farming and food acquisition, and to gain economic prosperity.

By examining the labor of slaves and food practices of the time, including those at George Washington’s Mount Vernon, the exhibition explores how power was exchanged between and among different peoples, races, genders and classes during the early colonial era.

“I’m really excited that Laupus was selected to host this exhibit, primarily because eastern North Carolina is situated adjacent to the Chesapeake region and so this history hits close to home,” said Beth Ketterman, interim director of Laupus Library. “We’ll be able to supplement the panels and digital materials with artifacts and archival materials from our collection which I think will add an important dimension for our visitors.”

An online version of the exhibition available at www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/fireandfreedom/exhibition0.html features a range of resources for educators and students, including two lesson plans developed for elementary and high school courses, a higher education module for undergraduate and graduate students and instructors, online activities, and a compilation of online resources. In addition, it offers a digital gallery of 18th-century materials on food, botany, health and housekeeping from the NLM collection.

The exhibit is available during operating hours posted at www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/about/hours.cfm, or call 252-744-2219.

The exhibition was brought to you by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

For more information contact Kelly Dilda at 252-744-2232 or rogerske@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly Dilda, University Communications

New director of Laupus Health Sciences Library announced

East Carolina University’s Board of Trustees approved the appointment of Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman as the new director of ECU’s William Laupus Health Sciences Library during a special called meeting Friday, Aug. 25.

Ketterman is an associate professor and has served as interim director of Laupus Library since November 2015. She has worked in various positions within ECU’s libraries for 16 years and will begin her new role Sept. 1.

“I am excited and humbled by the opportunity to lead the Laupus Library, particularly at this time in our university’s history as we seek to grow the research enterprise,” said Ketterman. “Laupus will contribute meaningfully to those efforts by innovating our services and collections in response to our faculty and students’ health-related information needs.”

Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

As director, Ketterman will oversee library operations and services, including those of the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey, N.C. She currently serves on several committees at ECU including the Medical and Health Sciences Foundation Board and Discovery Advisory Board.

“Ms. Ketterman is an accomplished researcher and administrator and brings a wealth of experience to the role as director of the William Laupus Health Sciences Library,” said Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor for the Division of Health Sciences at ECU.

Ketterman received her undergraduate degree from the College of William & Mary and a master’s degree in library science from North Carolina Central University. She is an American Association of Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) Fellow and received a leadership scholarship from the organization in 2015. She was also a recipient of the Medical Library Association Daniel T. Richards MLA Collection Development award.

Ketterman’s research efforts include 23 combined publications, articles and presentations in the arena of library science with a focus on collection development, electronic health information awareness, and implementation of electronic resources and technology in medical science libraries.

 

-by Jamie Smith

ECU’s Laupus Library makes science, history and medicine fun for kids

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library at East Carolina University hosted “Potion Power: Medicinal Herb Discoveries for Kids” on July 19 for nearly 100 children and parents as part of a botanical exhibit from ECU’s Country Doctor Museum.

Microscope station participants. (Photos by Michelle Messer)

Microscope station participants. (Photos by Michelle Messer)

On display in the library’s fourth floor gallery, “Nature’s Remedies: Traditions of Botanical Medicine,” explores the history of using herbs and other plants as remedies and preventatives and showcases objects used by ordinary consumers, druggists and medical practitioners in their search for relief and well-being.

“We were really overwhelmed by the attendance and positive response from the families who came out for our event,” said Beth Ketterman, interim director of Laupus Library. “The kids all seemed really excited by the interactive stations and the chance to talk with our experts about the plants they were viewing and handling.”

During the afternoon, attendees visited the exhibit and participated in hands-on learning and exploration stations including one where they made dream pillows using traditional medicinal herbs and mortars and pestles. An old-fashioned pharmacy station required them to use math skills, play dough and antique pill rollers to fill prescriptions. At the microscope station, they discovered a wide range of plant and animal cells up close. And finally, they were given a chance to color historic botanical drawings from the pages of the oldest coloring book in the world.

Kent and John fill a prescription using an antique pill roller.

Kent and John fill a prescription using an antique pill roller.

A team of Country Doctor Museum curators and staff from Laupus Library’s History Program offered attendees a brief history of the medicinal practices presented at each station and answered questions about health care needs in the past.

Live leeches, antique bloodletting tools, and a large collection of artifacts were also brought in from the Country Doctor Museum for the day as part of an educational demonstration for everyone.

Seven-year-old attendee Jason Sturz, who wants to be a paleontologist one day, said his favorite station was the microscopes and slides. “They are the coolest because they show everything up close,” he said. “That’s way easier than trying to catch a bug and look at it through a magnifying glass.”

Jason’s mother, Sarah Sturz said her children are homeschooled so she’s always looking for something educational and fun for them to attend. “Jason likes to talk to people and we’re working on social skills so I figured this was a good educational opportunity for him,” she explained. “He loved it.”

Alice Barber, age ten, found out about the event through ECU’s Campus Recreation Wellness Summer Camp she attends each week. She said she’s interested in science and medicine because she wants to be a veterinarian when she grows up. “I like the library,” she said. “It has so much cool stuff to learn about.”

“We will definitely pursue more events of this nature in the future,” said Ketterman. “The library and our museum have a lot more in our collections to inspire these kids, who all have the potential to be the next great leaders in healthcare.”

The exhibit will be on display until Aug. 21.

For more information about the event please contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda

ECU’s Laupus Library to host “Potion Power: Medicinal Herb Discoveries for Kids”

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library at East Carolina University will host “Potion Power: Medicinal Herb Discoveries for Kids” on July 19 from 2-4 p.m. in the library’s 4th-floor gallery as part of a botanical exhibit from ECU’s Country Doctor Museum.

Currently on display, “Nature’s Remedies: Traditions of Botanical Medicine,” explores the history of using herbs and other plants as remedies and preventatives. From botanical oils and apothecary tins to rhubarb and ginger, the exhibit showcases objects used by ordinary consumers, druggists and medical practitioners in their search for relief and well-being.

Laupus invites children ages eight and up and their parents to visit the exhibit and participate in an afternoon of hands-on learning and exploration.

Kids will use a mortar and pestle to make dream pillows. (contributed photo)

Kids will use a mortar and pestle to make dream pillows. (contributed photo)

“We’re really excited to share the history of medicine in a fun way with kids from the community,” said Beth Ketterman, interim director of Laupus Library. “Eastern NC has a rich history of providing health care to our community and the kids who come to the event will learn how our doctors in the region used to make medicine in ‘the good old days.’”

During the afternoon, kids will visit several activity stations. One stop will allow them to make dream pillows using traditional medicinal herbs and mortars and pestles. An old fashioned pharmacy station will require them to use math skills, play dough and antique pill rollers to fill prescriptions. At the microscope station, they will discover plant cells up close where they can compare dandelion fuzz to a carrot root. Lastly, kids will be able to show off their creativity with a chance to color historic botanical drawings from the pages of the oldest coloring book in the world.

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is not required. Light refreshments will be provided.

Parking passes will be available to all attendees upon arrival. Guests are required to park in “B-Zone” parking lots during the event.

For more information about the event please contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

ECU Libraries awarded funding to partner with research faculty on open science

East Carolina University’s 2017-2018 Interdisciplinary Research Awards (IRA) recipients include a collaboration between Joyner and Laupus libraries and the College of Allied Health Sciences.

Interdisciplinary Research Awards (IRA) are seed grants to support interdisciplinary research projects leading to competitive applications for extramural funding.

The project, “Transitioning to Open Science in Research Labs: a partnership between librarians and research faculty,” will explore open science tools for faculty and students to use in the lab, with the ultimate goal of developing an institutional infrastructure to facilitate open science now and in the future at ECU.

Open science is a movement towards making research more accessible to researchers and the public. (contributed photo)

Open science is a movement towards making research more accessible to researchers and the public. (contributed photo)

Open science is a movement towards making research more accessible to researchers and the public. Open science can encompass all aspects of the research process, including open data, open access articles, and even open lab notebooks. Additionally, open science tools can make it easier for researchers to adhere to public access policies required by federal funders.

Scholarly Communication Librarian for Joyner Library Jeanne Hoover and Dr. John Willson from the Department of Physical Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences will serve as primary investigators. The one-year pilot project will be based in the Human Movement Analysis Laboratory at ECU.

“I am looking forward to working with Dr. Willson and colleagues from Laupus Library on exploring ways to use Open Science Framework to help make research more accessible and reproducible,” Hoover said.

Research labs are a key component of teaching and scholarship at academic institutions. Proponents of the open science movement believe that establishing a culture of open science within research labs will drastically improve the exchange of information with the scientific community and general public and as a result, address questions of transparency and research reproducibility.

Co-investigators on the grant include Ting Fu, Laupus liaison to the College of Allied Health Sciences; Roger Russell, assistant director of user services for Laupus Library; and Joseph Thomas, assistant director for collections and scholarly communication for Joyner Library.

“I am very excited about this award, which brings opportunity for exploring Open Science at ECU,” said Fu. “There hasn’t been a project like this before on campus. We hope ours serves as an ice-breaker that will bring change and inspiration to all researchers in the future.”

 

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communication

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