Category Archives: Maritime Studies

Professor to appear on UNC-TV’s Exploring North Carolina

East Carolina University professor Dr. Stan Riggs will appear in two episodes of the UNC-TV series, “Exploring North Carolina,” in January. Hosted by Tom Earnhardt, the show focuses on the natural features of the state.

ECU professor, Dr. Stan Riggs, will appear in UNC-TV’s “Exploring North Carolina” this month. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

ECU professor, Dr. Stan Riggs, will appear in UNC-TV’s “Exploring North Carolina” this month. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Riggs, a distinguished research professor of geology, said he worked with Earnhardt to determine what topics were exciting and important to the show’s viewers. Each program required three to five days on location collecting video footage and interviews.

“The purpose of the programs is educating the public – how the cultural history is dependent on the coastal system,” said Riggs.

The first episode, “Canals of Northeastern North Carolina,” features the role of slaves who were brought to the state to dig the original canals that changed the landscape in the region. Riggs discusses the geology of the lakes and swamps and their significance.

The second program, “Long Parks,” tells the story of how two very different national parks –Cape Lookout National Seashore and the Blue Ridge Parkway – display the natural wonders of eastern and western North Carolina. Riggs speaks about the unique geological aspects of each park.

“Canals of Northeastern North Carolina” will air Thursday, Jan. 12 and “Long Parks” will be shown on Thursday Jan. 19 at 8:30 p.m.

Riggs said the episodes, along with others in the Exploring North Carolina series, will be made available to area schools after airing on UNC-TV.

In addition to his role at ECU, Riggs is chair of the board of directors of North Carolina Land of Water (NC-LOW), a non-profit group that partners with ECU and co-sponsored the Exploring North Carolina programs. NC-LOW’s website says the mission of the group is to contribute to long-term, sustainable economic development based on the natural resources and cultural history of the region and enhance the quality of life for residents. ECU geology faculty Dr. Dorothea Ames and Dr. Steve Culver and ECU Chief of Staff Jim Hopf also serve on the organization’s board of directors.

“NC-LOW looks at how we can build sustainable jobs for the future in a region that’s changing due to environmental factors like storms and flooding,” said Riggs.

More information about NC-LOW can be found at http://www.nclandofwater.org/ and Exploring North Carolina, http://www.unctv.org/content/exploringNC

 

-by Jamie Smith

ECU produces most archaeology, maritime professionals

For the third consecutive year, East Carolina University has produced the highest number of new registrants to the Register of Professional Archaeologists.

ECU is one of only a few graduate institutions in the U.S. offering an interdisciplinary master’s degree in maritime history and nautical archaeology, a key reason ECU continues to produce the highest number of applicants to the RPA. In fact, according to the article on the RPA web site, “In 2015, of the 313 applications received by The Register, 14 were recipients of Master’s degrees in Anthropology and Maritime Archaeology from East Carolina.”

ECU Still on Top_1 Digging along Tar River[2]

“The success of the Program in Maritime Studies is due in large part to the quality of our students,” said Dr. Bradley Rodgers, director of the program, housed in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Department of History. “They are self motivated, ambitious and high energy; you have to be to dive in some of the places we visit, which are seldom ‘Club Med’ environments.”

Researchers in the field of archaeology must apply to become members of the RPA, though not all applicants are accepted. The RPA expects its members to have high standards of research performance and adhere to a specific code of conduct.

Dr. Randy Daniel, chair of the Department of Anthropology said, “The fact that many of our MA archaeology grads are applying to RPA confirms that the training they receive at ECU meets the professional standards required to be listed on the register. Prospective employers of archaeologists, including state and federal agencies as well as private companies, look to the register to identify those archaeologists that meet established professional standards.”

ECU Still on Top_2 biscayne Jeneva and charlie[2]

Alumni of the ECU anthropology program accepted into RPA are Kathryn Parker and Kate Thomas. Alumni accepted into RPA from the ECU program in maritime studies include Jeremy Borrelli, Daniel Brown, Kara Fox Davis, Chelsea Freeland, Stephanie Gandulla, Thomas Horn, James Pruitt, William Sassorossi, Lucas Simonds, Greg Stratton, Jeneva Wright and Caitlin Zant.

For additional information about ECU’s programs in anthropology, visit www.ecu.edu/anth. More information about the program in maritime studies is available at www.ecu.edu/maritime.

–Lacey Gray

ECU professor to serve as Steffy Lecturer

ECU maritime studies professor Dr. David J. Stewart was asked by the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) to serve as the 2015-16 J. Richard Steffy Lecturer.

David Stewart

David Stewart

The lecture was established in 2008 to commemorate Mr. Steffy’s work in ship reconstruction and the interpretation of wooden ships.

Stewart will deliver a series of presentations to AIA societies on the Kyrenia Ship, Steffy’s most notable reconstruction achievement. The ship, which sank off Cyprus in about 285 B.C., is the best preserved ancient Greek hull available.

In 2011, Stewart led a team that conducted a complete 3D recording of the hull in Kyrenia Castle. He has been using computer modeling to gain a better understanding of the ship’s shape than was possible without the technology.

The ECU program in Maritime Studies is housed in the Department of History in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

ECU researcher’s wedding held in SeaWorld’s penguin habitat

ECU's Susanne Grieve and new husband Jeff Rawson celebrated their wedding in SeaWorld's penguin habitat this month. The couple met while completing research in Antartica. Photo by Jason Collier/SeaWorld Orlando

ECU’s Susanne Grieve and new husband Jeff Rawson celebrated their wedding in SeaWorld’s penguin habitat this month. The couple met while completing research in Antarctica. Photo by Jason Collier/SeaWorld Orlando

A SeaWorld wedding between East Carolina University’s director of conservation Susanne Grieve and Jeff Rawson, who met during a 2012 trip to Antarctica, is featured on the Orlando Sentinel and the local station, WFTV9.

The two were wed in the 32-degree penguin habitat at SeaWorld in Orlando, attended by 250 penguins inside SeaWorld’s Antarctica exhibit.

Read complete article at wftv.com.

Read coverage in the Orlando Sentinel.

 

 

ECU professor emeritus receives lifetime achievement award

Dr. William Still

Dr. William Still

ECU professor emeritus Dr. William N. Still, founder and former director of the ECU Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology program, was honored with a Knox Naval History Lifetime Achievement Award for lifetime achievements in the field of naval history.

Still was one of three recipients recognized at the McMullen Naval History Symposium, held last month at the U.S. Naval Academy. THe presentation included a video highlighting each recipients’ career, and each recipient received a medal commemorating their achievement.

The award recognizes contributions to naval history through scholarship, mentorship and leadership.  For additional information, visit http://www.navyhistory.org/2013/09/three-recipients-knox-naval-history-lifetime-achievement-award/.

ECU graduate students receive national awards for work on coastal issues

Two East Carolina University students in coastal resources management received 2012 Walter B. Jones Memorial Awards for Coastal and Ocean Resource Management.

Michelle Covi and Jennifer Cudney-Burch were selected to receive Excellence in Coastal and Marine Studies awards, presented by the National Ocean Service, a department of the national Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. The Jones awards recognize “innovation, resourcefulness, leadership and a commitment to balancing the human use of America’s coastal and ocean resources with the needs of the resources themselves,” according to the NOAA award web site.

Jennifer Cudney-Burch is a doctoral student with ECU professor Roger Rulifson at ECU’s Institute for Coastal Science and Policy. She served as a Sea Grant Knauss Fellow in Washington, D.C. for NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service, where she connected fishermen and policy makers. Her research on spiny dogfish management and migration along the U.S. East Coast and Canada, led to a new paradigm in spiny dogfish management plans recognized at both national and international levels. A summer 2010 article in “Coastwatch,” a N.C. Sea Grant publication, highlighted Cudney-Burch’s use of acoustics to track fish movement.

Ph.D. candidate Michelle Covi’s graduate work involves engaging rural communities in determining and planning for impacts of sea level rise on the region. Her research is addressing the significant need for citizen education, collaborative planning and effective policy making processes. Covi said she is gratified that the “work has received national recognition. This work would not be possible without the support of the Coastal Resources Management program, RENCI at ECU and my mentors,” Covi said.

Covi also works as the director of communication and outreach for the RENCI at ECU Engagement Center.

The awards were named for Walter B. Jones, Sr., who represented North Carolina in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1966 to 1992, including many years chairing the Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries. He established the award program to recognize contributions for maintaining healthy coastal and ocean resources.

Ten graduate student awards are presented nationally every other year. Of those ten, six recipients came from North Carolina universities. Represented in addition to ECU were Duke University, North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and Wilmington. Other winners hailed from the University of Virginia, Oregon State University and Florida Gulf Coast University. The town of Plymouth, N.C. received an award for excellence in local government for position change in the field of coastal management.

For additional information, visit http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/programs/ocrm/jones-noaa-awards.html.

Jennifer Cudney-Birch (Contributed photo)

Michelle Covi (Contributed photo)

ECU researchers explore history near Columbia

Dr. Nathan Richards, far right, presents information about known shipwrecks on the Scuppernong River at the Pocosin Arts Center in June. (Contributed photo)

 

East Carolina University researchers are collaborating this fall with the UNC Coastal Studies Institute and the citizens of Columbia, N.C. to explore the region’s history and close connection with the state’s coastal waterways.

Initial findings will be presented at an Oct. 6 public forum to be held in conjunction with the community’s annual Scuppernong River Festival and at an information booth open at the festival Oct. 8. More detailed results will be shared in a public symposium planned for late 2011 and a publication in the works for 2012. A grant application related to the project is also under development.

An old photograph of the mail boat, the "Estelle Randall," is among the artifacts uncovered so far in the collaborative project. (date unknown; Source: Mariners Museum PB2876 C176).

The researchers will use side-scanning sonar to search for lost shipwrecks in Bulls Bay and the Scuppernong River, while local residents provide a backdrop through their stories of the region’s history. Topics for study include waterway modifications, the evolution of trade networks and the fishing, lumber and naval store industries in the area.

ECU history professor Dr. Nathan Richards, who specializes in nautical archaeology, met with residents in June to begin conversations about the project. Collection of oral histories has begun, including stories of how residents relied on boats from Elizabeth City to bring the mail and goods that were traded for vegetables, fish and crabs. Residents will provide river tours and house students and faculty participating in the research.

The grant application will seek funding for the development of a digital media project, The Scuppernong River Heritage Trail, which could be presented in tandem with the existing Scuppernong River Interpretative Boardwalk, a .75-mile wetlands trail near Columbia.

Richards said the area provides the perfect location for a maritime heritage trail because of the existing infrastructure, the extensive history in the area and the two prominent rivers in the area (the Scuppernong and Alligator Rivers). Columbia is also situated along a major tourism corridor, he said, as a stop along the route to the North Carolina Outer Banks.

For additional information, contact Richards at 252-258-4264 or richardsn@ecu.edu.

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Protecting Artifacts

On Feb. 19, the 66th anniversary of the landing of the U.S. invasion on Iwo Jima, East Carolina University historians and conservators held a public viewing of a rare rubber topographical map depicting Iwo Jima during WWII. The map illustrated airstrips and roads on the island and was used for training naval intelligence officers. ECU Director of Conservation Susanne Grieve (Maritime Studies) said ECU conservators preserved the map by removing previous restorations that caused the rubber to deteriorate. Grieve, center, is pictured above with maritime studies graduate student Nicole Wittig, left, and Emily Powell, graduate student in history. Following the event, the map was returned to the Battleship North Carolina collection in Wilmington. Other presenters included history professors Michael Palmer on World War II and John Tucker on Japan in World War II; and Joyner Library Special Collections Curator Jonathan Dembo on the Joyner Library World War II special collections. Dembo displayed items from the library’s collections of original letters, action reports and maps showing the landing beaches on Iwo Jima and the Western Pacific theater. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)