Category Archives: Nursing

College of Nursing welcomes 125 new students

More than 100 ECU students were officially introduced to the nursing profession during the College of Nursing’s twice-annual Lamp of Learning ceremony on Aug. 31.

The ceremony, held in the Brody School of Medicine auditorium, recognized 125 new students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program as family and friends looked on.

Meaghan Brown receives her lamp pin from a classmate at the College of Nursing’s Lamp of Learning ceremony on Aug. 31. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Meaghan Brown receives her lamp pin from a classmate at the College of Nursing’s Lamp of Learning ceremony on Aug. 31. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

During the ceremony Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the college, reminded students of the university’s dedication to service, a value shared by the college and the nursing profession. She emphasized Gallup Poll data that has consistently pointed to nursing as the most trusted profession among all professions, and urged new students to remain honest and ethical in order to preserve that trust.

“That is a wonderful characteristic that we want to maintain and instill in our nursing students,” she said.

Dr. Annette Peery, associate dean for undergraduate programs, introduced each student on stage as Brown presented him or her with a gold lamp pin representing Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing. The lamp symbol signifies service and light, and is also featured on the College of Nursing pin that students receive at graduation.

“As you wear that pin, think of these symbols and what they mean, particularly your orientation to service as part of the profession,” Brown said.

Nursing student Taylor Harrison recites the College of Nursing pledge at the Lamp of Learning ceremony at the Brody School of Medicine on Aug. 31.

Nursing student Taylor Harrison recites the College of Nursing pledge at the Lamp of Learning ceremony at the Brody School of Medicine on Aug. 31.

Krista Whitley, a nursing student from Kinston, was among those having pins affixed to their purple scrubs.

“It’s really special,” she said. “It makes me want to work even harder. Ever since high school I’ve always wanted to be a nurse. I job shadowed in high school and observed a couple of surgeries. It really pumped me up and made me want to be a nurse.”

Admission to the College of Nursing’s BSN program is very competitive. In addition to meeting the university and college requirements, students’ scores on a required national pre-admission exam are taken into account along with their GPA, enrollment status and other factors. Students accepted into the program this year had an average GPA of 3.7.

Phyllis Burt attended the ceremony to watch her daughter Heavenlee Burt receive her pin.

“She worked hard for this and I love her. I am very proud of her,” Burt said. “I came a long way just to catch her in this moment. I think the world is going to be a better place.”

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communication

ECU Colleges of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences open joint research hub

The process of finding new ways to help patients live healthier lives may have just become a little easier for faculty in East Carolina University’s College of Allied Health Sciences and College of Nursing.

The two colleges have been working together on research for years, but a new collaborative research hub promises to make the grant application and administration process more efficient, leaving faculty members more time to focus on improving patient outcomes and overall health and wellness.

The CON-CAHS Research Administration Hub, located on the university’s West Campus in the Health Sciences Building, aims to maximize support for faculty members by providing the administrative components involved in pursuing grants and conducting the research funded by them? It is the first collaborative research hub on the university’s health sciences campus.

Associate Deans for Research and Scholarship Dr. Patricia Crane, from nursing, and Dr. Heather Harris Wright, from allied health, will oversee the hub along with an administrative board that includes the colleges’ associate deans for research and Interim Health Sciences Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research Dr. Kathy Verbanac.

From left, Susan Howard, Jessica Miller and Latoya Sahadeo will staff the new CON-CAHS Research Administration Hub. (Photo by Alyssa De Santis Figiel)

From left, Susan Howard, Jessica Miller and Latoya Sahadeo will staff the new CON-CAHS Research Administration Hub.
(Photo by Alyssa De Santis Figiel)

“The point of it is to capitalize on resources,” Crane said at the hub’s open house on May 18. “Traditionally, in each college we’ve had one person that did pre- and post-award (grant management),” Crane said. “If that person was out sick or we had more than one grant, or we had multiple grants or someone was on vacation, we were just lost. We’d have to go find someone else. It was a struggle.”

Creating a central hub to help faculty with administrative grant work was a perfect solution given that the two colleges have been collaborating on research efforts for years. Nursing’s three-year, $2.5 million Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program grant involves the CAHS’s Physician Assistant Studies program, and the three-year, $2.1 million grant from the Versant Center for the Advancement of Nursing involves the CAHS Department of Health Sciences & Information Management.

The hub will have one pre-award grant manager and two post-award grant managers. Jessica Miller, the pre-award grant manager, will provide budget support and preparation, seek out funding opportunities and help faculty with grant application development. Post-award managers Latoya Sahadeo and Susan Howard specialize in different types of grant management and will aid faculty members once a grant has been awarded.

“All the funding agencies, while there are some commonalities, they’re so vastly different in expectations and how they’re administered, and the rules and regulations associated with them,” Crane said. “This allows us to designate people that that’s their area of expertise. Instead of being a generalist in everything, now we have two experts in that for post-award.”

Wright agreed that the additional resource provided to faculty by the hub would be helpful as they pursue new research.

“As the funding portfolio for College of Allied Health Sciences continues to diversify and more faculty are seeking external funding to support their programmatic lines of research, increased support for pre- and post-award grant activities is needed,” she said. “The Hub will greatly benefit faculty across both colleges. We will be able to provide more support for the faculty and allow them to focus their time and energy on their science by providing them support in identifying funding opportunities, helping with proposal development, and administrative support.”

 

 

-by Natalie Sayewich 

 

Annual lecture series focuses on academic writing

A recent lecture series hosted by East Carolina University’s College of Nursing aimed to help nursing faculty members increase their academic writing.

The 9th annual Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series on April 6 featured presentations by Dr. Kim Skarupski, associate dean for faculty development at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Dr. Paul Silvia, a Lucy Spinks Keker Excellence Professor in the University of North Carolina-Greensboro’s Department of Psychology and the author of How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing.

Dr. Kim Skarupski discusses how faculty members can dedicate more time to writing during the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series on April 6 at Eastern Area Health Education Center. (Photos by Conley Evans)

Dr. Kim Skarupski discusses how faculty members can dedicate more time to writing during the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series on April 6 at Eastern Area Health Education Center. (Photos by Conley Evans)

In her presentation, Skarupski discussed how faculty members can learn to prioritize writing every day and make it a habit amidst a full schedule of other duties. She recommended writing accountability groups, or WAGs, where participants convene regularly to work on writing and to encourage and hold each other accountable for reaching their goals.

“This is not an option if you’re an academic,” Skarupski said of writing. “You have to do the scholarship portion… The mantra should be, ‘Writing is my job. I do my job every day.’”

She said it’s important for busy faculty members to carve out a small amount of time for writing each day and to remain dedicated to that specific amount of time — no more and no less.

“The whole concept of a WAG is to get people to write more frequently, more regularly, because you’re trying to establish a habit, but for shorter durations,” she said.

Skarupski also suggested expanding the definition of writing to include actions that aren’t necessarily putting words on paper, but that are necessary elements for the writing process. This could include collecting data, copying tables and sending emails requesting information.

Copies of How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing, written by visiting scholar Dr. Paul Silvia, were distributed to participants of the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series.

Copies of How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing, written by visiting scholar Dr. Paul Silvia, were distributed to participants of the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series.

“Once you expand your definition of writing, you’re taking a huge weight off your shoulders,” she said. “Now it’s not just words, words, words. Now it’s all those components,” Skarupski said. “If you expand that definition of writing, now when you have a 10-minute block open because a meeting ended early or a student cancelled on you…smart objectives are being met.”

Silvia, who studies the psychology of creativity and what makes things interesting, also recommended consistency in writing over scheduling large writing “binges.”

“Because time is so self-renewing and self-replenishing until it isn’t, we really take it for granted,” he said. “So we don’t use it as well as we could.”

Silvia used the example of faculty who lose two weeks of potential writing time because they rationalize the decision not to write the week before spring break – because they are “building up to it” – and not to write the week after spring break – because they are “burnt out.”

“So for whole swaths of the semester, people just totally abandon it,” he said. “Today, there might not be four hours, but there’s an hour, and that might be the only hour we have this week. The slow and steady approach is very powerful.”

The Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series began in 2007 through the generosity of ECU faculty members and spouses Dr. Mary Ann Rose, professor of nursing, and Dr. Walter Pories, professor of surgery and biochemistry. Rose and Pories named the series after Pories’ uncle, a World War II veteran, to honor the nurses who cared for him throughout an extended illness.

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communication

College of Nursing inducts 10 into Hall of Fame

The East Carolina College of Nursing inducted 10 members into its Hall of Fame on Friday, March 31, during a ceremony held at the Hilton Hotel Greenville. The event, which also recognized the college’s 2017 Distinguished Alumnus, honors outstanding contributors to nursing in the areas of education, administration, research and practice.

The college of Nursing inducted 10 new members into its Hall of Fame and honored its 2017 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient on Saturday, April 1, 2017, at the Hilton Greenville. From left, Polly Johnson, Genemarie McGee, Debra Pomeroy, Sharon Overton, Donna Montana-Rhodes, Linda Hofler, Dean Sylvia Brown, Donna Gardner, Jean Matthews, Jayne Holland, Sonya Hardin and Mary Holland. (Photos by Conley Evans)

The college of Nursing inducted 10 new members into its Hall of Fame and honored its 2017 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient on Saturday, April 1, 2017, at the Hilton Greenville. From left, Polly Johnson, Genemarie McGee, Debra Pomeroy, Sharon Overton, Donna Montana-Rhodes, Linda Hofler, Dean Sylvia Brown, Donna Gardner, Jean Matthews, Jayne Holland, Sonya Hardin and Mary Holland. (Photos by Conley Evans)

This year’s class includes inductees that hold leadership roles in major medical centers, the CEO of a statewide nonprofit nursing organization, esteemed nursing faculty members and one former U.S. Navy commander.

The Hall of Fame has raised approximately $94,000 for a merit-based student scholarship fund since its inception in 2011.

Distinguished Alumni Award recipient Linda Hofler, left, and College of Nursing Dean Sylvia Brown.

Distinguished Alumni Award recipient Linda Hofler, left, and College of Nursing Dean Sylvia Brown.

“The Hall of Fame was established to recognize the service of nurses who are considered to be among the most highly regarded nurse leaders and to acknowledge the significant impact that inductees have made to the advancement of nursing,” said Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the College of Nursing. “This Hall of Fame not only recognizes our outstanding leaders, but is another way to give back to future generations of nurses.”

The 2016-2017 Hall of Fame Scholarship recipient, Kelly Bulloch, a master’s student in the nurse anesthetist program, was recognized at the event.

The 2017 inductees join a list of 90 Hall of Fame members. Each new member receives a flame-shaped award that resembles the lamp illustrated on the college’s nursing pin. The lamp and its associated flame symbolize a commitment to service and a vibrant life. This year’s Hall of Fame class:

  • Donna Jean Gardner, Freeport, PA
  • Sonya Hardin, Greenville, NC
  • Jayne Holland, Savannah, GA
  • Mary Holland, Greenville, NC
  • Polly Johnson, Chapel Hill, NC
  • Jean Matthews, Ahoskie, NC
  • Genemarie McGee, Chesapeake, VA
  • Donna Montana-Rhodes, Washington, NC
  • Sharon Overton, Greenville, NC
  • Debra Pomeroy, Winterville, NC

On a night set aside for celebrating influential nurse leaders, the college also recognized the recipient of its 2017 Distinguished Alumnus Award. This year’s awardee is Linda Hofler of Greenville, who earned both her master’s and PhD in nursing from ECU. Hofler serves as the senior vice president — nurse executive at Vidant Medical Center, the level-one trauma center that serves a 29-county region in eastern North Carolina.

Learn more about the College of Nursing’s Hall of Fame and Distinguished Alumnus Award by visiting www.nursing.ecu.edu/hof.cfm.

 

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communication

College of Nursing graduate named Air Force ROTC Distinguished Graduate

Jonathan Jeffries, a recent graduate of East Carolina University’s College of Nursing, was named a Distinguished Graduate at his Air Force ROTC commissioning ceremony in December.

The honor is given to the top 10 percent of the Air Force ROTC graduating class nationwide, which this year included 1,815 graduates from 144 detachments. The award is predicated on success and leadership in academics, ROTC and in the community.

Jonathan Jeffries, right, receives a sabre in recognition of being named a Distinguished Graduate during his Air Force ROTC commissioning ceremony in December. (Contributed photo)

Jonathan Jeffries, right, receives a sabre in recognition of being named a Distinguished Graduate during his Air Force ROTC commissioning ceremony in December. (Contributed photo)

“I think he’s the whole person concept as far as what we would need as a leader,” said Lt. Col. Roxane Engelbrecht, Jeffries’ commanding officer who nominated him for the award. “He is physically fit and he excels academically — those are the first two things. The third is leadership quality and his ability to lead groups of people, not only in the Air Force and Air Force ROTC, but his demonstrated leadership at the university is somewhat unparalleled by most cadets.”

Jeffries was the College of Nursing’s fall 2016 senior class president. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science in nursing in December with a 3.89 GPA. He helped to organize a relief effort to aid Greenville flood victims following Hurricane Matthew in the fall of 2016. He also spearheaded his class’s efforts to raise money for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society during the 2016 Walk MS fundraiser.

Engelbrecht has nominated five cadets for the award since she came to ECU in 2014. Of those, Jeffries is one of four to have been selected as a recipient.

“It was a huge shock and a huge honor,” Jeffries said of the award, which came in the form of a sabre Engelbrecht presented him at the ceremony. “I’m not one to care about being recognized, but when it does happen it’s definitely nice to see all the effort and all the hard work you’ve put in – throughout your time either with ROTC or at the College of Nursing – be recognized. It was a surreal moment. It was probably one of the best days of my life so far.”

Prior to attending ECU, Jeffries served in the U.S. Marine Corps for three and a half years, but separated from that branch after being injured in pre-deployment training.

Jeffries plans to make a career as an Air Force nurse. He will go to Arizona in February for the Air Force’s 10-week nursing training before being stationed at Eglin Air Force base in Florida.

 

-by Natalie Sayewich

Laupus Library celebrates scholarship in health sciences

Faculty and staff from across East Carolina University’s Division of Health Sciences recently gathered for an annual celebration of research and scholarship.

Dr. Leigh Cellucci, professor in Health Services & Information Management, receives the Laupus Bronze for authoring a book this year. (Photo by Kelly Dilda)

Dr. Leigh Cellucci, professor in Health Services & Information Management, receives the Laupus Bronze for authoring a book this year. (Photos by Kelly Dilda)

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library held its 11th Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards at the Hilton Greenville on Nov. 15, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library. Laupus is “proud to be a partner in the research and publication process,” noted Elizabeth Ketterman, interim director.

“It is inspiring to see the breadth of research that occurs in the division over a year’s time,” she added.

There were 114 authors honored this year, who contributed to nearly 375 journal articles, book chapters, books and other creative works between July 2015 and June 2016.

Book author Dr. Laura Gantt, associate dean for nursing support services, is congratulated by Vice Chancellor Phyllis Horns.

Book author Dr. Laura Gantt, associate dean for nursing support services, is congratulated by Vice Chancellor Phyllis Horns.

“Every year we do this we have a longer and longer list of faculty and staff who are fully engaged in the work of the university,” remarked Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor for health sciences.

Dr. Nicholas Benson, interim dean of the Brody School of Medicine, applauded authors’ “effort to share your knowledge and generate wisdom…to make a real difference in the wellness of eastern North Carolina, from Murphy to Manteo, and across the nation and world.”

It was College of Allied Health Sciences Dean Dr. Robert Orlikoff’s first appearance at the event, having arrived at East Carolina this fall from a prior leadership post at West Virginia University.

“The reason that ECU exists is for our students…and how our students represent the future,” he said. “But this event focuses attention on our talented faculty who make all of that (learning) possible. Their scholarship is directly tied to the student experience, and advancing health care and transforming the region.”

Authors from Laupus, the ECU College of Nursing and the School of Dental Medicine were also recognized.

Registration for the 2016-17 author event will begin in February. More information about the annual awards ceremony – including a complete listing of this year’s published authors – is available online at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/HSAR/.

Dr. R. Todd Watkins and Dr. Geralyn Crain, both faculty in ECU's School of Dental Medicine, enjoy this year’s Author Recognition Awards Ceremony. (Photo by Peggy Novotny)

Dr. R. Todd Watkins and Dr. Geralyn Crain, both faculty in ECU’s School of Dental Medicine, enjoy this year’s Author Recognition Awards Ceremony. (Photo by Peggy Novotny)

 

–Kathryn Kennedy

Kennerly, Sitzman inducted as fellows in the American Academy of Nursing

Two East Carolina University faculty members have been inducted as fellows in the American Academy of Nursing. College of Nursing Professors Dr. Susan Kennerly and Dr. Kathleen Sitzman were honored during a ceremony at the academy’s annual conference Oct. 20-22, 2016, in Washington, D.C.

“I am delighted to welcome this superb cohort of talented clinicians, researchers, policy leaders, educators and executives as they join the ranks of the nation’s leading nursing and health care thought leaders,” said Academy President Dr. Bobbie Berkowitz.

Selection criteria for fellowship include evidence of significant contributions to nursing and health care and sponsorship by two current fellows. Applicants are reviewed by a panel of elected and appointed fellows.

Kennerly is an eminent scholar known for her work in geriatric nursing and on the influence of nursing culture on care practices. She led entrepreneurial practice activities that enhanced nursing care delivery and outcomes and informed the science behind nursing practice environments by co-authoring the Nursing Culture Assessment Tool, the first of its kind, now used nationally and internationally to evaluate and shape nursing culture.

Kennerly

Kennerly

Kennerly is widely recognized for her pioneering work testing systematic interventions for pressure ulcer prevention in nursing homes. She was a co-investigator on the seminal research that aimed to reduce pressure ulcers by using music to cue staff to reposition nursing home residents every two hours. The pioneering study — which resulted in a 45 percent protective effect against pressure ulcers — was broadly reported in high-impact journals and serves as a key reference for subsequent work in advancing nursing best practices.

Kennerly currently serves as the co-principal investigator on a nearly $3 million National Institutes of Health grant that aims to determine if every two hour repositioning frequency can be extended to three or four hours without negative outcomes for residents at risk of pressure ulcer development. In 2014, she was a member of a working group that published standards for the International Clinical Practice Guideline for Pressure Ulcer Prevention and Treatment. Kennerly is wound care certified and a certified nurse educator, and serves as a team leader and evaluator for the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

Sitzman is an internationally respected expert for her knowledge and research on human caring in nursing. One particular area of her expertise is virtual caring, in which Sitzman explores the scholarship of teaching in ways that convey and sustain communities of caring among students and faculty in online classroom settings. She has been primary investigator for eight studies on this topic alone. In addition to ECU, she is an adjunct professor with the Watson Caring Science Institute and created the College of Nursing’s first Massive Open Online Course, on the topic of Caring Science, which has been attended by over 2,000 people internationally since its first offering.

Sitzman

Sitzman

In addition to publishing more than 100 journal articles, she has co-authored four successful nursing textbooks. Her book A History of American Nursing: Trends and Eras won the American Journal of Nursing Textbook of the Year Award in 2009. Two of her books are being translated: Caring Science, Mindful Practice is coming out in Chinese and Spanish; Understanding the Work of Nurse Theorists is being translated into Spanish.

Sitzman serves as assistant editor and peer review board member for the International Journal for Human Caring. She is a peer reviewer and editorial board member for Nursing Education Perspectives, the journal of the National League for Nursing. She was inducted into the National League for Nursing’s Academy of Nursing Education in 2015. In November, she will be a keynote speaker at the Third International Congress of Nursing in Lima, Peru, where she will receive an honorary doctorate from the Universidad Privada Norbert Wiener S.A.

Also inducted as a fellow was North Carolina State Rep. Gale Adcock, an ECU alumna, College of Nursing Hall of Fame member, and recipient of nursing’s 2006 Distinguished Alumni Award.

The academy comprises more than 2,400 nurse leaders in education, management, practice, policy, and research. Fellows include hospital and government administrators, college deans, and renowned scientific researchers. With the new class of 164 inductees, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 28 countries are represented.

–Elizabeth Willy

Gantt named Journal of Emergency Nursing Reviewer of the Year

Dr. Laura Gantt, associate dean for nursing support services in the East Carolina University College of Nursing, has been awarded the Journal of Emergency Nursing Reviewer of the Year Award. The first-ever award recognizes Gantt for more than ten years of service that has included work both as a manuscript reviewer and a member of the journal’s editorial board.

Journal of Emergency Nursing is the peer-reviewed publication of the Emergency Nurses Association, which has more than 40,000 members representing over 35 countries. Gantt’s selection was the result of a multi-stage process, the journal’s editorial board said, and was based on the quality and quantity of her manuscript reviews.

Gantt

Gantt

“The editorial board appreciates Laura’s willingness to participate in the review process, her timeliness in completing reviews, and the expertise consistently demonstrated in her thorough, insightful and helpful feedback to authors and editors,” the group stated when presenting the award at an Emergency Nurses Association awards gala on Sept. 17 in Los Angeles.

Gantt’s own referred articles include three papers in Journal of Emergency Nursing on emergency department administrative issues and in publications such as Clinical Simulation in Nursing Education and Journal of Nursing Education.

Also an associate professor of nursing at ECU, Gantt joined the College of Nursing in 2006 to run its simulation and skills labs. She has helped shape the College of Nursing’s simulation labs — in which students practice real-world scenarios using manikins and other lifelike technology — into a cornerstone of the ECU nursing education. In 2015, she published the book “Healthcare Simulation: A Guide for Operations Specialists.” As associate dean, she oversees the simulation labs, instructional technology, student services, and student development and counseling.

Gantt has been a member of the Emergency Nurses Association since 1995. Her extensive experience with emergency nursing has included work as flight nurse and an administrator overseeing emergency and transport services. She continues to practice nursing in the Vidant Health Minor Emergency Department.

–Elizabeth Willy 

College of Nursing celebrates donors, scholarship recipients

Like many East Carolina University College of Nursing graduate students, Tikia Yelverton works full-time in addition to taking courses. So when Yelverton, a nurse at the Vidant Medical Center Ambulatory Surgery Unit, earned a scholarship, it made it that much easier to continue her studies.

“It meant a little bit of the financial burden lifted,” said Yelverton, who is expected to graduate from the doctor of nursing practice program in 2018.

Yelverton was one of 93 students who received $283,350 in scholarship support from the College of Nursing for this academic year. The college honored this year’s awardees — along with the donors who made their scholarships possible — at a Sept. 30 event held at Rock Springs Center. The merit and need-based awards range from $500 to $6,500 and were open to undergraduate and graduate nursing students through a competitive application process.

Speaking at the event, Dean Sylvia Brown highlighted the College of Nursing’s 56-year tradition of excellence in education, research and practice. The college prepares students who pass licensure and certification exams at rates well above the national average. In order to continue this legacy, Brown said, the college must enable students to focus on their educational goals and worry less about financial constraints.

Dean Sylvia Brown, Tikia Yelverton, and Laura Lloyd (contributed photo)

Dean Sylvia Brown, Tikia Yelverton, and Laura Lloyd (contributed photo)

“Your gifts enable many of our students to pursue their dreams of becoming nurses or continuing their education in nursing,” she said.

Many of the scholarships given were created to honor individuals who have or had exceptional dedication to the field of nursing. The event represented a unique opportunity for donors and the students who benefit from their generosity to meet and learn about each other.

Donors like Hal Pierce, who consistently attends the annual ceremony, said it’s a way to stay connected with the college and honor a loved one. He established the Hal and Eldean Pierce Beta Nu Scholarship in memory of his late wife, former ECU faculty member and alumna Eldean Pierce.

“I always enjoy meeting the person that gets it,” he said. “I like knowing what their goals are, what direction they’re going in.”

–Elizabeth Willy

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