Category Archives: Presentations

Undergraduates share research at event

Ten undergraduate researchers from across the country shared their research projects Aug. 3 at East Carolina University’s Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, wrapping up the final week of a research-intensive program funded by the National Science Foundation.

The Biomedical Engineering in Simulations, Imaging and Modeling Research Experience for Undergraduates, led by ECU’s departments of engineering, kinesiology and physical therapy, hosted students from nine universities to conduct original research in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

The program, initially funded by a $288,000 grant from the NSF, gives undergraduate students an understanding of how to conduct research and to learn more about graduate school opportunities.

Madeline Pauley’s, left, research topic focused on plantar fasciitis and the internal structure of the foot in healthy patients and patients suffering from the condition.

Madeline Pauley’s, left, research topic focused on plantar fasciitis and the internal structure of the foot in healthy patients and patients suffering from the condition. (Photos by Matt Smith)

During the 10-week program, students investigated fields ranging from bioengineering to physiology, learning the research process firsthand.

“This was really my first time doing research that was my own project,” said Madeline Pauley, who will graduate this summer from ECU with a degree in exercise physiology. “The program allowed me to decide what I wanted to research. We were guided through the process, but we had a lot of freedom to make our own decisions that you may not get when you’re just volunteering in a lab.”

Pauley’s research focused on plantar fasciitis and the internal structure of the foot in healthy patients and patients suffering from the condition. Joining Pauley from ECU was rising junior Victoria Blackwood. Her research looked at osteoarthritis in post-ACL reconstruction patients and rehabilitation techniques that may limit knee joint pain in patients who have undergone surgery.

“I came to the program with little research experience, so I didn’t know what I was getting myself into,” Blackwood said. “In just a short time I’ve realized what goes into conducting research and that I do want to continue participating in research projects in the future.”

•Rising East Carolina University junior Victoria Blackwood, right, shares her research on osteoarthritis in patients who have undergone ACL surgery at the The Biomedical Engineering in Simulations, Imaging and Modeling Research Experience for Undergraduates post session at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium on Friday.

Rising East Carolina University junior Victoria Blackwood, right, shares her research on osteoarthritis in patients who have undergone ACL surgery at the The Biomedical Engineering in Simulations, Imaging and Modeling Research Experience for Undergraduates post session at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium on Friday.

Pauley and Blackwood said that having students from other universities – including the University of Connecticut, Mercer University and Long Beach State University, among others – added to their program experience.

“Our research peers from other universities helped show me my strengths and weaknesses,” Pauley said. “It was interesting to see how we complemented one another. My background is in anatomy and physiology, but most of their backgrounds were in bioengineering and technology. It was eye-opening to learn about their interests and see how researchers can work together to accomplish things.”

Stephanie George, an assistant professor of engineering at ECU, oversees the program with associate professor of kinesiology Zac Domire. George hopes giving undergraduate researchers with varied interests an opportunity to work with one another shows them the importance of multidisciplinary and collaborative research.

“They put a lot of work into it, but they rely on each other a bit because of their diverse expertise,” she said. “We have computer science, engineering and physics majors; there’s a lot of different expertise that they share with one another. We believe at the end of it all they have a better understanding of the research process and gain confidence that they can lead a project and share it with others.”

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Miller School of Entrepreneurship students visit, learn from school’s namesake

In 2015, the Miller School of Entrepreneurship was established thanks to a $5 million gift from ECU College of Business (COB) alumnus Fielding Miller and his wife, Kim Grice Miller. The school’s goal is to serve as a regional hub that prepares students to take an entrepreneurial mindset and skill set into their communities.

Students with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship pitch their ideas to Raleigh-entrepreneurs, including COB Alumnus and the school’s namesake, Fielding Miller. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Students with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship pitch their ideas to Raleigh-entrepreneurs, including COB Alumnus and the school’s namesake, Fielding Miller. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Three years later, Miller School students hit the road and pitched their ideas to the school’s regional advisory councils, which include COB alumni and entrepreneurs. The council visits have included Wilmington, Greenville and Raleigh.

On April 6, students with the Miller School visited CAPTRUST Financial Advisors, the Raleigh-based independent investment research andfee-based investment advisory firm. This visit marked the first time that Miller, co-founder, chairman andCEO of CAPTRUST, was able to see Miller School students in action, which included a five-minute presentation and 30-minute Q&A session with three student teams.

Fielding Miller

Fielding Miller

When asked how it felt to see these presentations, Miller said, “I was thrilled with the visit – the student presentations were compelling and showed a lot of creativity, andthe turnout of the experienced entrepreneurs in the Raleigh area was heartwarming to see.”

The Raleigh-area entrepreneurs that Miller mentioned included members of the Miller School’s Triangle Advisory Council. Van Isley, the Triangle Advisory Council’s president, also attended the event. He recently gave $2 million to the COB that will be used to provide a space for business, engineering, technology and art students to collaborate on product innovation and entrepreneurship. The Miller School student presentations marked his first time Isley saw the student entrepreneurs in action. Of the presentations, he said the students’ energy, enthusiasm and passion was exciting and invigorating to witness.

“Several years ago I participated in one of the first shark tank presentations, which was part of a final exam for one of the senior business classes,” said Isley. “It was one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done, andit made me want to get more involved. It really speaks to the quality of students the College of Business is producing.”

Student Experiences

The Raleigh-area entrepreneurs were not the only ones in the meeting that were impressed. The participating student teams were also impressed with what they saw and heard.

CAPTRUST’s offices sit on top of the 17-story, CAPTRUST Tower in Raleigh and provide a view of Raleigh’s growing skyline. They heard from Miller, who talked about his entrepreneurial journey and his top lessons learned over the years. And, these students heard pointed, direct feedback from the entrepreneurs in the room.

Senior Chris Allen

Senior Chris Allen

Chris Allen is a pre-med computer-science major who is taking advantage of the entrepreneurial and small business management classes provided by the Miller School. He pitched a health carerelated blockchain idea during his visit.

“I never had an experience that was that invigorating, and that allowed me to learn so quickly and connect with so many people that could influence my future,” said Allen.

Brady Hillhouse of the Charlotte area is a freshman that is pursuing a double major in finance and entrepreneurship. He is already an entrepreneur who owns a foreign exchange education company.

He viewed the experience as a working lunch to receive mentorship and guidance from entrepreneurs from multiple industries. According to Hillhouse, his projected career path is very similar to Miller’s. He wants to become a stockbroker and open his own financial advisory firm, andHillhouse says what he heard at the event was valuable.

“That was justincredible feedback and mentorship on the next steps to take in life and his company,” said Hillhouse. “It’s feedback I couldn’t have gotten anywhere else even if I paid for it.”

According to Dr. Mike Harris, director of the Miller School, the April event, as well as the previousevents, were designed to help establish mentoring relationships.

“The Miller School is very fortunate to have four advisory councils with active statewide members who are willing to help nurture the next generation of entrepreneurs,” said Harris.

“I was astounded by the quantity and quality of successful entrepreneurs who were willing to give of their time, energy and experience,” said Isley.

After the event, Miller was not only pleased with what he witnessed but is excited for the future.

“I want to participate in as many as I can,” said Miller. “It is fascinating to see the students in action, and I came away more enthusiastic than ever about the potential of the program. So far, it (the Miller School) has exceeded my expectations.”

According to Harris, the Miller School will plan a similar event in Charlotte during a Fall 2018 meeting of its Piedmont Regional Advisory Council.

Van Isley, CEO and founder of Professional Builders Supply, speaks with Miller School students during their recent visit to Raleigh’s CAPTRUST.

Van Isley, CEO and founder of Professional Builders Supply, speaks with Miller School students during their recent visit to Raleigh’s CAPTRUST.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

ECU kicks off Research and Creative Achievement Week

A line of posters, students and judges in Mendenhall Student Center kicked off East Carolina University’s 2018 Research and Creative Achievement Week on March 26.

The 12th annual event features more than 440 research posters and presentations, giving undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students an opportunity to share their work with their peers and mentors.

Student Andra Glover (left) discusses her research poster with judges at the 2018 Research and Creative Achievement Week. The event began Monday at Mendenhall Student Center and runs through April 2. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Student Andra Glover (left) discusses her research poster with judges at the 2018 Research and Creative Achievement Week. The event began Monday at Mendenhall Student Center and runs through April 2. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

RCAW allows students from all disciplines – from biomedical sciences to visual arts and design – to practice their presentation skills and interact with other creative scholars on campus. Judges, made up of ECU faculty, staff and graduate students, provide a balanced evaluation of the students’ work, grading them on subject knowledge, effective medium use, clarity and question response, and originality and creativity. Awards are presented at the end of the week to both poster and oral presenters.

Left to right, guest panelists Bridget Todd, Allison Mathews and Suzanne Lazorick discuss how they have used research and creative achievement to change the world at RCAW’s opening session and discussion panel. (Photo by Matt Smith)

Left to right, guest panelists Bridget Todd, Allison Mathews and Suzanne Lazorick discuss how they have used research and creative achievement to change the world at RCAW’s opening session and discussion panel. (Photos by Matt Smith)

For the first time, RCAW held an opening session and panel discussion. The event featured digital strategist Bridget Todd, MATCH Wellness co-director Suzanne Lazorick and 2BeatHIV director and Community Expert Solutions CEO Allison Mathews. The trio hosted the panel “Run with New Ideas: Using Research and Creative Achievement to Effect Real World Change.” Todd, Lazorick and Mathews discussed their work with underserved communities – including women, children and minorities – and took questions from the crowd.

Katina Hilliard, a graduate student in the College of Health and Human Performance, said she wanted to go through the learning experience of presenting her research to others. Hilliard and her co-researcher’s study focused on the relationship between staff practices in an after-school service program and school connectedness.

“Presenting at RCAW gives you a lot of practice in public speaking,” Hilliard said. “Presenting your research to others is a big part of the research process and this gives you an opportunity to share in a safe setting. In the future when I present at conferences, I’ll be able to use this experience to guide me.

Research posters line the halls of Mendenhall Student Center for the opening of RCAW.

Research posters line the halls of Mendenhall Student Center for the opening of RCAW.

“Every one of the judges and students that come through RCAW are here to help you,” she said. “They’re not here to criticize or put your work down; they’re here to build you up and make your work better.”

RCAW Chairman and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies Tom McConnell agreed with Hilliard, emphasizing the importance of students dipping their research toes into public speaking.

“RCAW is all centered around our students,” McConnell said. “We want to give them a number of learning opportunities. These presentations are often the first presentations ECU students give and they gain valuable communication skills in the process. They also learn how to work with teammates and mentors – important skills to master if they plan to continue their research initiatives in the future.”

RCAW will run until April 2. More information is at https://blog.ecu.edu/sites/rcaw/.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Ethnic Studies Film Series screening on March 21

ECU Ethnic Studies, Sociology department, English department, and the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center present: Forbidden; Undocumented and Queer in Rural America by Tiffany Rhyard. The documentary will be shown in Sci-tech 307C on Tuesday, March 21 from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Forbidden is a feature length documentary about an inspiring young man whose story is exceptional, although not unique. Moises is like the thousands of young people growing up in the United States with steadfast dreams but facing overwhelming obstacles.

If you are an undocumented queer immigrant living in the United States amidst this turbulent political climate, you are not safe and your future is at risk. When Moises Serrano was just a baby, his parents risked everything to flee Mexico and make the perilous journey across the desert in search of the American dream. After 23 years growing up in the rural south where he is forbidden to live and love, Moises sees only one option — to fight for justice.

The film chronicles Moises’ work as an activist traveling across his home state of North Carolina as a voice for his community, all while trying to forge a path for his own future.

Both the director, Tiffany Rhynard, and Moises will be attending the screening. There will be a breif Q & A after the film. This event is a Wellness Passport Event!

-by Gera s. Miles Jr., Ethnic Studies

 

Inaugural Taft STEM Education Lecture set for Jan. 24

East Carolina University’s College of Education will host the inaugural Taft STEM Education Lecture on Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 6 p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.

Dr. James Shymansky. (Contributed photo)

Dr. James Shymansky. (Contributed photo)

The speaker will be Dr. James Shymansky, the E. Desmond Lee Endowed Professor in Science Education at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

The event is free and open to the public.

The College of Education started the lecture series to ignite new ideas in teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics or STEM. The series will bring international knowledge and discovery from well-known education scholars to eastern North Carolina. The lectures also will provide opportunities to ECU students, faculty and K-12 school staff to meet and collaborate with scholars while increasing the visibility of ECU’s commitment to STEM education.

Shymansky’s research has focused on factors influencing student performance and how professional development activities for teachers translate into enhanced student attitudes and achievement. He is working on a set of online student materials that focus on Next Generation Science Standards, a program consisting of web-based, dual language interactive science modules for elementary and middle school children that can be accessed in English, Spanish, Mandarin and Arabic.

For more information on Shymansky, visit https://coe.umsl.edu/mycoe/index.cfm?event=p2_profiles:viewProfile&sso_id=jimshy.

 

-by Terah B. Archie, College of Education

Medical Education Day showcases innovation

East Carolina University’s Second Annual Medical Education Day was held April 20 at the Brody School of Medicine. The event showcased 27 projects related to undergraduate and graduate medical, nursing and allied health education from students and faculty across the health sciences campus.

College of Engineering student Samantha Hamann discusses her poster with Brody dean Dr. Paul Cunningham during the university’s second annual Medical Education Day.

College of Engineering student Samantha Hamann discusses her poster with Brody dean Dr. Paul Cunningham during the university’s second annual Medical Education Day.

The event provided faculty, residents and students the opportunity to present innovations in curriculum and teaching, educational research and leadership to a growing community of educators, leaders, scholars and learners to promote educational excellence.

The best oral presentation award was presented to Dr. John Norbury, clinical assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, for his work entitled, “A Focus on Nerves and Joints: Impact of a Revised Curriculum for the 4th Year Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clerkship at Brody School of Medicine.” Second place was awarded to Dr. Luan Lawson, assistant dean for curriculum, assessment and clinical academic affairs at Brody, for her presentation, “Implementation of an Interprofessional Simulation Curriculum for Medical and Nursing Students using TeamSTEPPS.” Third-year medical student David Baker took home the third-place award for his presentation, “Latino Lay Health Advisors Building a Healthier Community.”

The best poster award went to Dr. Shuhua Ma, a third-year pathology resident, for her project, “Implementation of Resident Sign Out with Functions to Compare Resident and Attending Reports.” Second place was scooped up by Samantha Hamann, a student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, for her project, “A Shoulder Reduction Trask Trainer.” Third place was awarded to Melissa Barnes, a graduate student in the Department of Public Health, for her poster, “Inclusion of LGBT Health Topics in Curriculum at Brody School of Medicine.”

The event is an offshoot of Brody’s $1 million, five-year grant from the American Medical Association to help reshape how future doctors are trained.

To view the podium and poster presentations or to learn more about Brody’s AMA grant – the REACH Initiative – visit ecu.edu/reach.

–Amy Ellis

ECU faculty, students to present at conference

Pictured left to right are graduate students Marianne Ayers, Benjamin Wigand, Miranda Guardiola, Anne Saville and Andrea Fulle. (Photo provided by Maria McDonald, teaching instructor of sociology)

Pictured left to right are graduate students Marianne Ayers, Benjamin Wigand, Miranda Guardiola, Anne Saville and Andrea Fulle. (Photo provided by Maria McDonald, teaching instructor of sociology)

East Carolina University will be well represented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Southern Sociological Society in New Orleans March 25-28.

Presenting at the event are four Department of Sociology faculty members, 10 graduate students, five undergraduates and two alumni.

Several ECU presenters will participate in paper, roundtable and poster sessions to discuss research focusing on gender inequality, including sexual assault. Others are presenting research on a broad range of topics including social impacts of the digital divide, mysogynoir, the impact of student volunteer work, North Carolina’s environmental movement and attitudes toward the Confederate flag.

This year’s meeting theme is “Stalled Revolutions? Gender Inequality in the 21st Century.”

For additional information, contact Marieke Van Willigen, interim chair of sociology, at 252-328-6092 or vanwilligenm@ecu.edu.

Chitwood speaks at Beijing conference

Dr. W. Randolph Chitwood Jr. was one of the speakers at a recent conference on robotic surgery in China.

Dr. Randolph Chitwood Jr.

Chitwood, the Eddie and Jo Allison Smith Distinguished Chair and director of the East Carolina Heart Institute, spoke at the third Beijing International Symposium and Workshop on Robotic Cardiac Surgery, held July 14-16.

The event is an opportunity for medical professionals and experts from around the world to share the latest information about robotic surgery. Chitwood, a senior associate vice chancellor and professor of cardiovascular sciences at East Carolina University, is a pioneer in robot-assisted heart surgery, particularly mitral valve repair and replacement.

A link to an interview with Chitwood at the conference is available at the workshop’s website, http://www.bisrocs.net/index.html.

 

Student support staff present at national conference

East Carolina University student support staff presented at the National Academic Advising Association Region 3 conference in Charlotte this month.

Members of East Carolina University’s student support staff presented at National Academic Advising Association Region 3 conference on April 12-14 in Charlotte.

Presenters and their topics were as follows:

  • “The Hokey Pokey of College Parenting…When to Step In and When to Step Out,” by Dr. Jayne Geissler, executive director of Retention Program and Undergraduate Studies; Steven Asby, academic advisor for undecided and freshmen nursing students; and Dinecia Gates, academic advisor in the School of Communication;
  • “ECU Excels: First Semester Students Receive Victory Lap” by Jennifer Cabacar, coordinator for Undergraduate Student Services in the School of Communication; and Elizabeth Coghill, director of the Pirate Tutoring Center;
  • “Selecting, Implementing, and Assessing an Effective Academic Early Alert and Connect System Integrating Academic Advisors” by Geissler, Coghill and Asby with John Trifilo, associate director of Academic Advising and Support Center (Starfish project manager);
  • “The Advising Collaborative:  Roadmap for Winning the Race” by Beth Fuller, academic advisor for undecided and freshmen nursing students; Jill Naar, academic advisor for the College of Human Ecology; Nancy Lilley, assistant director of Academic Advising for the College of Nursing; Heather Weigand, academic advisor for undecided and freshmen nursing students; and Dr. Lisa Rogerson, professor in the College of Education.
  • “Academic Advising: Putting the ‘Personal’ Back in Interpersonal Communication,” a poster presentation by Daniel Wiseman, academic advisor in the School of Communication and Anthrony Coutouzis, academic advisor in the College of Allied Health Sciences.

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