Category Archives: scholarships

Scholarship encourages ECU students to help rural hometowns after graduation

East Carolina University senior Carley VanHoy wants to make a difference in the world, starting with her hometown. The Mount Airy native and elementary education major is one of nearly a hundred ECU students receiving a scholarship for such resolve.

VanHoy gets financial support for college from the Golden LEAF Foundation, which was created to strengthen the economies of rural or tobacco-dependent communities in North Carolina. (LEAF stands for Long-term Economic Advancement Foundation). Each year, Golden LEAF awards scholarships to students from qualifying rural counties who express an interest in returning to the state’s rural areas to work after graduation. Since its inception in 1999, the organization has awarded $44 million in scholarships to 19,000 students across the state. There are currently 709 Golden LEAF scholars in North Carolina, and 82 at ECU.

The Golden LEAF Foundation celebrated its ECU scholars at an on-campus luncheon on Tuesday.

The Golden LEAF Foundation celebrated its ECU scholars at an on-campus luncheon on Tuesday. (Photo by Randy Yiu)

“It was a huge weight off my shoulders, because we all know you don’t become a teacher for the pay,” VanHoy said. It was through Golden LEAF that VanHoy had a paid internship at A Time For Science last summer, sparking an interest in science education and a decision to pursue a master’s degree in the subject.

“I would not be the person I am today without Golden LEAF,” she said.

Many other ECU students echo her sentiment.

“Programs like Golden LEAF have provided me the opportunity to focus on my studies and extracurricular activities, instead of worrying about the financial responsibility that comes along with college,” said Jamie LoScalzo, a senior engineering major from New Bern. The program’s support freed her to become the president of the Dean’s Student Leadership Advisory Council for the College of Engineering and Technology, president of ECU’s chapter of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and a teaching assistant for several engineering courses.

After graduation, LoScalzo plans to work as a general engineer in a quality and calibration lab in Havelock.

Freshman Trysten Culler from Stokes is in his first year with Golden LEAF and is looking forward to the professional and personal experiences the program offers.

“With this program, I am confident and excited to better myself as well as rural North Carolina,” he said.

The environmental health major hopes to work as a specialist for the local health department or a nonprofit that promotes sustainability. He spoke Tuesday at a luncheon in Greenville that ECU hosted for Golden LEAF Scholars, staff and members of the foundation’s board of directors.

Chancellor Cecil Staton, who was also in attendance, addressed the crowd and said, “It’s a day to celebrate our Golden LEAF scholars. We’re proud of each and every one of you.”

He added that 46 percent of ECU students hail from rural areas – more than double the amount of the next closest institution in the UNC System.

“Like Golden LEAF, we are committed to preparing students, especially students from the rural areas, and giving them the tools to change our state, region and the world,” he said.

Golden LEAF President Dan Gerlach said it makes sense that ECU has the most Golden LEAF scholars in the state because the foundation and the university share similar goals and are therefore great partners.

“Golden LEAF is proud to have so many scholars attending East Carolina University because our mission aligns so closely with ECU’s mission of serving the public and transforming the region,” he said. “Golden LEAF is proud to be celebrating 20 years of awarding scholarships to help students who have deep roots in rural North Carolina, who are likely to return home.”

To learn more about the Golden LEAF Foundation, visit goldenleaf.org/scholarships.html.

 

-by Erin Shaw, University Communications

ECU’s College of Education inducts 35; raises $40K for scholarships

Thirty-five educators and education advocates have been inducted in the East Carolina University College of Education’s Educators Hall of Fame.

The 20th annual ceremony was held Oct. 27 in the Fletcher Recital Hall on ECU’s campus. The event raised $40,000 for student scholarships.

Each inductee was sponsored with a monetary gift of $1,000 or more in support of the College of Education’s Educators Hall of Fame Scholarship endowment. Annual interest from the endowment is used to fund merit-based scholarships for students. This prestigious merit scholarship program helps attract the best and brightest students to the College of Education.

The College of Education inducted 35 people in the Educators Hall of Fame during a ceremony held on campus in October.

The College of Education inducted 35 people in the Educators Hall of Fame during a ceremony held on campus in October. (Contributed photo)

This year’s inductees are all from North Carolina:

Jessica Lee Chiasson Adams of Washington; Delores Pride Ali of Timberlake; Lisa Yeldell Barmer of Washington; Robert L. Barrier Jr. of Concord; David Lee Batts of Greenville; Marvin Eugene Baugh of Greensboro; Michelle Rouse Bowen of Ayden; Julia Dawkins Brickhouse of Greenville; Phoebe Moore Dail of Greenville; Wilford Morris Davis III of Hampstead; Maureen Louise Ellis of Greenville; Holly Heath Fales of Greenville; Johna Lee Faulconer of Smithfield;  Cleveland Melvin Hawkins of Sunbury; Elizabeth Baker Hodge of New Bern; Amanda Oliver Holton of Creswell; Gwen P. Jeffreys of Greensboro; Stephen E. Kirk of Raleigh; Eric Kisling of Greenville; Johnnie Earl May of Greenville; Katherine E. Misulis of Greenville; Miriam Grace Mitchell of Cornelius; Susan Elizabeth Morgan of Rocky Mount; David Parke of Greenville; Diane Terry Sena of Fayetteville; April Shackleford of Wilson; Elizabeth Harris Sparrow of Greenville; Richard Kent Spruill of Grimesland; Patricia Stallings of Pinetops; Rebecca Stell of Bath; Dorothy Tolson of Tarboro; Sherry Smith Tripp of Greenville; Ivan G. Wallace of Farmville; Christine Marie Wilson of Greenville; and Tomegia M. Winston of Spring Hope.

Since 1999, the Educators Hall of Fame has recognized the service and contributions of 509 individuals who have impacted the lives of others, the field of education and the College of Education at ECU. The annual event has raised more than $613,000 toward the endowment goal of $1 million for Educators Hall of Fame Scholarships.

Following the ceremony, a reception was held on the first floor of Speight Building and the adjoining courtyard so inductees and guests would have the opportunity to view the Educators Hall of Fame wall.

The Hall of Fame is the brainchild of Bob Sawyer, a retired teacher, ECU graduate and former chair of the Dean’s Advisory Council. Sawyer, a college swimmer and charter member of ECU’s Sports Hall of Fame, believed that teachers deserved the same recognition as athletes.

 

-by Terah Archie, College of Education Office of Community Relations and Outreach

ECU Glaxo Women in Science Scholars network with mentors

ECU sophomore Jamie Chamberlin (left) and senior Ashley Lynn (right) were able to talk with ECU alumna Dr. Renu Jain (center) during the Glaxo Women in Science fall meeting in October.

ECU sophomore Jamie Chamberlin (left) and senior Ashley Lynn (right) were able to talk with ECU alumna Dr. Renu Jain (center) during the Glaxo Women in Science fall meeting in October. (Contributed photos)

East Carolina University sophomore Jamie Chamberlin and senior Ashley Lynn are recipients of the 2018 Glaxo Women in Science scholarship. As recipients of the scholarship, they receive more than just a monetary award.

The North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Women in Science Scholars Program, which awards two scholarships each at 30 colleges and universities in North Carolina, is providing Chamberlin and Lynn the opportunity for one-on-one mentorship from professional women in scientific fields and attendance at the fall meeting and spring conference.

“After a year of waiting, I was beyond thrilled to be given one of the 2018 scholarships from GlaxoSmithKline,” said Chamberlin, who is also an EC Scholar pursuing a bachelor of science degree in biochemistry with a concentration in chemistry, as well as a bachelor of science degree in biology. “The program goes far beyond a financial opportunity; it is an investment in women who will enter careers still heavily dominated by unspoken patriarchal restrictions.”

Chamberlin credits another woman in science who influenced her decision to attend ECU, Dr. Cindy Putnam-Evans, interim chair of biology and Harriot College associate dean for research. The scholarship was established at ECU in 1993. Putnam-Evans has served on the selection committee for the scholarship since 1996 and has chaired the committee for many years.

Chamberlin, seen here in the Brody School of Medicine Geyer Lab during the 2018 summer biomedical research program, is making hydrophobic dams around cryosectioned tissue in preparation to perform research via indirect immunofluorescence.

Chamberlin, seen here in the Brody School of Medicine Geyer Lab during the 2018 summer biomedical research program, is making hydrophobic dams around cryosectioned tissue in preparation to perform research via indirect immunofluorescence.

“It was Dr. Cindy Putnam-Evans who first told me about the GlaxoSmithKline Women in Science Scholars Program, and I immediately knew I wanted to be one of the two girls offered the opportunity,” said Chamberlin, who decided then that ECU was the “right fit.”

Ashley Lynn, who is pursuing her bachelor of science degree in geological sciences, said, “When I learned that I had won the scholarship, I was ecstatic. I was happy to learn that they typically don’t accept seniors, but they liked my application so much, that they awarded it to me. I love being able to represent an amazing foundation.”

This year, Dr. Allison Danell, associate professor of chemistry and adjunct associate professor in pharmacology and toxicology, accompanied Chamberlin and Lynn to the Glaxo Women in Science fall meeting.

“I think our scholarship recipients enjoy this unique opportunity to attend these professional development meetings,” Danell said. “The program connects them with mentors who are willing to share their own stories.”

Chamberlin and Lynn heard from several women in leadership roles and spoke with scientists at GlaxoSmithKline. One of those women included ECU alumna Dr. Renu Jain, who earned her doctoral degree in biochemistry from ECU’s Brody School of Medicine in 1997. Now, Jain serves as the scientific director for medical affairs at GlaxoSmithKline in Durham’s Research Triangle Park.

Lynn presented her research, performed during the 2017-2018 academic year, at the Geological Society of America’s southeastern section conference.

Lynn presented her research, performed during the 2017-2018 academic year, at the Geological Society of America’s southeastern section conference.

“When her [Jain] speech was over, I felt motivated to go after my Ph.D.,” Lynn said. “I learned that everyone’s journey is different and that there are multiple ways to achieve your goals.”

“It was beyond wonderful to hear from incredibly successful women who served as speakers for the event,” Chamberlin said. “Each talked about the obstacles they had to overcome to manage a thriving career under a glass ceiling that often feels more like concrete.

“I left the conference inspired and confident that I, like every woman, have the potential to persevere through a major in the hard sciences and pursue higher education beyond my undergraduate degree,” said Chamberlin.

For additional information about the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation and the Women in Science Scholars Program, visit http://www.ncgskfoundation.org/women-in-science.html.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

After wife’s death, professor creates nursing scholarship in her name

Dr. Tom Irons keeps a voicemail on his phone of his wife laughing. It’s just a short giggle in an otherwise mundane message, but her laugh is one of the many things he adored about her.

When she passed away unexpectedly in May 2016, Irons struggled not only with the shock of her death, but how to keep her memory alive.

Dr. Tom Irons with his wife, Carol

Dr. Tom Irons with his wife, Carol (Contributed photos)

Here was a woman who lived life so fully, who was so strong and vivacious. Carol Irons loved music, theater and Pirate athletic events. She laughed loudly and often and was not afraid to use colorful language. She was a fierce friend, a devoted mother and an empathetic and accomplished nurse. She was outspoken about social injustices and equality and was an advocate of women’s and children’s health.

“She really knew how to take care of other people,” Irons said.

He decided to create a scholarship in Carol’s name for Honors College students who are interested in women’s and children’s health, show commitment to service and demonstrate financial need.

“I think the primary reason I chose to do this with the support of my children was that I wanted the things she stood for to continue. To have something in her name that would give aspiring nurses the opportunity to enhance and fund their education,” he said.

Irons is a professor of pediatrics at the Brody School of Medicine, director of ECU’s generalist physician program and associate vice chancellor for regional health services. He is a Greenville native who returned home in 1981 to join the faculty at Brody. After he and Carol raised three children, Carol went back to school to get her master’s degree in nursing from ECU and later joined the faculty as well. Both of their sons, Tom Jr. and James, graduated from ECU. Their daughter, Sarah, did not attend ECU but is a physician like her father.

Nurses are uniquely prepared to cultivate their empathy, and Carol was good at it, whether it was opening their home to neighborhood children and strangers in need or deciding at age 60 to go to Africa and start a health clinic in Zambia. To her core, she believed in service, a tradition she shared with her husband and ECU.

Tom and Carol Irons on a medical mission trip in western Zambia.

Tom and Carol Irons on a medical mission trip in western Zambia.

“Something that was important to Carol and I was that, if we were to be remembered for anything, we wanted to be remembered for what we gave, and I’m not talking about money. I’m talking about how we served,” Irons said. “I believe we give for the students of the future, the young faculty of the future. To show that this university stands for what it says it does.”

The Carol Irons Nursing Scholarship is also about Carol’s legacy for her family.

“I’d like my (seven) grandkids to look at this scholarship and say, ‘That’s named after my grandma,’” Irons said. “I’d like them to know what a great nurse she was, and a great citizen. I think this is an opportunity to let other people know what she stood for.”

 

-by Erin Shaw, University Communications

Alumni road race raises $5,800 for student scholarships

The 11th annual Pirate Alumni Road Race and Fun Run raised $5,800 for student scholarships, according to the ECU Alumni Association.

More than 300 runners and walkers gathered at the start line in downtown Greenville on April 21 and were treated to a new 5K route through campus. Runners scampered up Fifth Street, then wound their way past Joyner Library, the Cupola, Trustee’s Fountain and Wright Auditorium. It was a sunny and temperate Saturday, and campus was quiet save for birds chirping, the fountain bubbling, and runners’ breathing heavily. As they made their way back to the finish, they were greeted by high fives from PeeDee, music from a DJ, and vendors like Smash Waffles and JuiceVibes ready to offer post-run fuel.

Runners participate in the 11th annual Pirate Alumni Road Race on April 21. (Photos by Caroline Tait)

Runners participate in the 11th annual Pirate Alumni Road Race on April 21. (Photos by Caroline Tait)

Clayton Bauman, a 2008 broadcast journalism alumnus, said the new route was like taking a walk down memory lane.

“When you’re out there and seeing all the purple and gold, all the buildings, the old stomping grounds, it really takes you back,” he said. Bauman even upped the nostalgia factor by running to a special playlist with hits popular during his time in college.

Erica Bell, a former ECU track athlete and current graduate student, ran the race last year while six months pregnant. This year she ran pushing her son, William, in a stroller.

“Normally, he can stay up for the first five minutes and then he falls asleep,” she said.

Bell added that she preferred the new course. “It’s nice that it went through campus, that kind of distracts you along the way. And this weather was perfect.”

All proceeds from the Pirate Alumni Road Race and Fun Run benefit the ECU Alumni Association scholarship fund. The alumni association annually awards scholarships to qualified undergraduates for the following academic year. To date, the alumni association has awarded 297 scholarships totaling nearly $432,000.

Alumni scholar and sophomore Emma Plyer worked the check-in station at the race and said she was extremely thankful for her scholarship.

“It’s a really great opportunity for us students to further our education and not worry about the financial burden that college has,” she said. “We just get to be students.”

For more information about ECU Alumni Association Scholarships, visit http://www.piratealumni.com/s/722/hybrid/indextabs.aspx?sid=722&gid=1&pgid=2250

 

-by Erin Shaw, University Communications

College of Allied Health Sciences celebrates scholarship recipients, donors

A relatively small donation nearly 40 years ago created a domino effect of generosity that continues to help students in the ECU College of Allied Health Sciences.

On March 26, the college celebrated its scholarship recipients and their donors during a scholarship celebration at Rock Springs Center banquet hall in Greenville. During the event, the college awarded 69 scholarships to 66 students for the upcoming academic year. The awards totaled $106,650 and ranged in value from $500 to $5,000 each.

Scholarship recipient Aliaha Austin, an undergraduate in communication sciences and disorders, speaks with donors during the ECU College of Allied Health Sciences’ annual scholarship celebration at Rock Springs Center on March 26. (Photos by Alyssa De Santis Figiel)

Scholarship recipient Aliaha Austin, an undergraduate in communication sciences and disorders, speaks with donors during the ECU College of Allied Health Sciences’ annual scholarship celebration at Rock Springs Center on March 26. (Photos by Alyssa De Santis Figiel)

Donors choose to give for a variety of reasons. For Stas and Brenda Humienny, who graduated from the college with degrees in clinical lab sciences in 1979, it was about having a personal understanding of the financial hardship that often comes with being a full-time student, and how much it can make a difference when someone provides assistance.

“The event from the past that made this an easy decision occurred during our senior year in the CLS program,” the Humiennys said via email. “Brenda had exhausted all sources of money and saw no choice but to drop out of school for a year, work to raise funds, and then graduate a year later. A pathologist learned of her situation, gave her a check for $500, and the rest is history. We cannot even imagine how our lives would have changed had it not been for that kind and generous gesture.”

As a way of paying it forward, the couple established the Stas & Brenda Humienny Endowed Scholarship in 2006, and have continued to contribute to that fund since. They said they hope that their generosity will be passed along in the same way in the future.

“We are so hopeful that today’s scholarship recipients will be tomorrow’s benefactors to all disciplines covered by allied health,” the couple said.

Dr. David Edwards of Kinetic Physical Therapy and Wellness speaks to the crowd at the ceremony.

Dr. David Edwards of Kinetic Physical Therapy and Wellness speaks to the crowd at the ceremony.

Jenyqua Young, a junior health services management student and scholarship recipient, hopes to become a health care administrator at a hospital with the hopes of helping to serve communities in need.

“Receiving the Loiuse O. Burevitch Memorial Scholarship is truly a life changing moment,” she said. “It will aid me in my educational and professional journey to serve underprivileged and underserved communities that are at a disadvantage when it comes to the quality of health care services.”

Scholarship recipient Katlyn Fry, a graduate of ECU’s Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders program and the first in her family to receive a bachelor’s degree, is now working on a master’s in speech-language pathology at ECU.

While working at a camp for underprivileged children, Fry met a child on the spectrum for autism and was unable to form words on his own, igniting a passion in Fry for helping others communicate.

“This is how I learned about the career of speech-language pathology and it became my passion,” she said. “Both the Meta Downes and James and Carol White scholarships are helping me achieve my goal of helping those who cannot help themselves. For this, I am eternally grateful.”

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communications

Greenville science teacher receives inaugural John C. Park Scholarship

A new scholarship at East Carolina University helped send an eastern North Carolina science teacher to a national conference this month.

Allie Smith, an eighth grade science teacher at C.M. Eppes Middle School in Greenville, attended the annual National Science Teachers Association National Conference on Science Education in Atlanta.

Her trip was made possible by the John C. Park Scholarship, established this year by Dr. Leonard Annetta, the College of Education’s Taft Distinguished Professor of Science Education, and the ECU Center for STEM Education.

Dr. Leonard Annetta, right, and Shawn Moore, left, present eighth-grade C.M. Eppes Middle School teacher Allie Smith with the inaugural John C. Park Scholarship on  March 8 in her classroom. (Photos by Cole Dittmer)

Dr. Leonard Annetta, right, and Shawn Moore, left, present eighth-grade C.M. Eppes Middle School teacher Allie Smith with the inaugural John C. Park Scholarship on March 8 in her classroom. (Photos by Cole Dittmer)

The scholarship, valued at up to $1,500, provides funding for science teachers from eastern North Carolina in their first five years of teaching to attend the annual national conference. Going forward, the endowment will provide an award for two science teachers (one in grades K-5 and another in grades 6-12) each year.

“I am so grateful to ECU and the scholarship donors for this chance to attend this conference,” she said. “ECU has steadily provided me with unmatched opportunities while I earned my bachelor’s and master’s degrees, and they continue to do so now in my second year of teaching.”

John C. Park Scholarship recipient Allie Smith at the 2018 NSTA National Conference on Science Education in Atlanta.

John C. Park Scholarship recipient Allie Smith at the 2018 NSTA National Conference on Science Education in Atlanta.

Smith received her bachelor of science in middle grades education and her master of arts in education for middle grades from ECU with concentrations in math and science education.

The scholarship is named for John C. Park, who spent 25 years as a professor of science education at North Carolina State University where he had an influence on several members of ECU’s science education faculty.

“A leader by example, John dedicated his life to his family, his church, and to education,” Annetta said. “He created innovative ways of instilling others with the curiosity and desire to learn and positively impact the world around them.”

Annetta presented Smith with the inaugural scholarship on March 8 in her classroom. He shared a letter from Park’s wife, Lory Park, about what attending professional development conferences meant to her husband’s career.

The annual John C. Park Scholarship will provide funding for two science teachers from eastern North Carolina in their first five years of teaching to attend the annual NSTA National Conference on Science Education.

The annual John C. Park Scholarship will provide funding for two science teachers from eastern North Carolina in their first five years of teaching to attend the annual NSTA National Conference on Science Education.

“He was troubled by the cost and the low attendance of new teachers,” Lory Park said. “Although he had little control over the cost of a conference, he himself made an effort to get the attendance of teachers just starting their careers higher by providing funding through whatever means possible for these teachers.”

Smith said she hopes to bring her students more exposure to science education.

“My goal for going to the NSTA conference in Atlanta is to find affordable ways to bring authentic science experiences to my students,” Smith said. “As a teacher in a Title I school, I work with a majority of students who, for a plethora of reasons, are unable to engage with science in a meaningful way outside of my classroom.”

To qualify for the scholarship, teachers must have taught less than five years at the time of the application within the Latham Clinical Schools Network and be a National Science Teacher Association member in good standing.

For more information or to apply for the scholarship, contact Annetta at annettal16@ecu.edu or 252-328-6179.

 

-by Cole Dittmer, University Communications

ECU College of Nursing inducts 11 into Hall of Fame

The ECU College of Nursing inducted 11 new members to its Hall of Fame on Friday, March 16, and honored its newest Distinguished Alumni Award winner during a ceremony at the Hilton Hotel Greenville.

The Hall of Fame, which honors outstanding contributors to nursing in education, administration, research and practice, has raised $116,000 for merit-based student nursing scholarships since 2011. It is one of only two academic hall of fame programs at ECU. This year’s event raised $25,000 in scholarship funds which were distributed among five students equally.

Eleven new members were inducted into the College of Nursing Hall of Fame on Friday, March 16, 2018, during a ceremony at the Hilton Greenville. The ceremony also honors a distinguished alumnus each year. (Photos by Conley Evans)

Eleven new members were inducted into the College of Nursing Hall of Fame on Friday, March 16, 2018, during a ceremony at the Hilton Greenville. The ceremony also honors a distinguished alumnus each year. (Photos by Conley Evans)

This year’s class includes inductees who have served in leadership roles for major medical centers, national health care non-profit organizations, higher education and the military. Two inductees were honored posthumously and their awards were accepted by family members on their behalf.

“This Hall of Fame not only recognizes our outstanding leaders, but is another way to give back to future generations of nurses,” said Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the College of Nursing.

Inductees to the College of Nursing Hall of Fame receive a flame-shaped award that mirrors the flame featured in the College of Nursing pin, representing a vibrant life.

Inductees to the College of Nursing Hall of Fame receive a flame-shaped award that mirrors the flame featured in the College of Nursing pin, representing a vibrant life.

The 2018 inductees join 100 other Hall of Fame members. Each receives a flame-shaped award that mirrors the flame featured in the College of Nursing pin, representing a vibrant life.

Two of this year’s Hall of Fame Scholarship recipients — Shana-Ann Caballes and Aaron Jamison — attended the event.

“Most people don’t know the process you have to go through to be a nurse anesthetist. It involves taking graduate-level courses in anatomy, physiology, pharmacology and clinical anesthesia courses as well. That’s the first 15 months. The following 15 months includes clinical aspects as well,” said Caballes, a senior in the college’s master’s program in nurse anesthesia. “Needless to say, it leaves absolutely no time for any outside employment. … I really appreciate this scholarship. It’s changed my life.”

This year’s Hall of Fame class:

  • Daphne Brewington, Winterville, NC
  • Beth Bryant, Greenville, NC
  • Howard Burtnett, Winterville, NC
  • Patricia Crane, Asheboro, NC
  • Phyllis DeAntonio, Greenville, NC
  • Mark Hand, Raleigh, NC
  • Janet Joyner, Greenville, NC
  • Deborah K. Kornegay, Wilmington, NC
  • Sandra Manning, Greenville, NC
  • Ann Schreier, Greenville, NC
  • Wanda Snyder, Garner, NC

The college also recognized the recipient of its 2018 Distinguished Alumni Award, Dr. Annette Wysocki. Wysocki received her Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing and Master’s of Science in Nursing from ECU and a PhD from the University of Texas at Austin. She serves as Associate Dean for Research and Professor at the College of Nursing at the University of Massachusettes, Amherst. She is also the Pilot Project Core Director of a $1.2 million P20 Center Grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communications

Social work graduate student featured in state publication

Lowry

Lowry (Contributed photo)

William Lowry Jr., a combat veteran and master of social work student at East Carolina University, has received a scholarship dedicated to increasing the number of practitioners working with military service members and their families.

Lowry was featured in the North Carolina Governors Institute on Substance Abuse winter newsletter.

The scholarship, funded by the N.C. Division of Mental Health Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services, aims to dually license practitioners and increase the number of licensed clinical addiction specialists working in North Carolina. The scholarship program is building a workforce that will support military service members and their families.

Lowry served 30 years in the military and is a combat veteran of the Gulf War and Operation Iraqi Freedom. His goal is to help people recover from substance use, mental health and medical issues.

Lowry is employed as a N.C. certified peer support specialist and integrative health coach in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care Center in Wilmington.

In the future, Lowry hopes to open a practice that serves veterans, at-risk youth and adults and provides educational workshops and training. He will graduate in May 2019.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

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