Category Archives: Students

ECU to host Fall Career Fairs for students and alumni

East Carolina University Career Services will host two career fairs on Oct. 17 at the Greenville Convention Center. The College of Engineering and Technology (CET) Career Fair will be held from 9-11 a.m., followed by the Fall Career Fair for all majors from 1-4 p.m.

The CET Career Fair is open to all Engineering and Technology majors or students interested in pursuing a career within these fields. During the two-hour session, students will have the opportunity to connect with more than 100 employers, including both local and national companies. That afternoon, the Fall Career Fair will welcome students of all majors at ECU and feature over 200 employers.

ECU students and alumni have the opportunity to meet potential employers from across the country recruiting for internship, part-time and full-time positions. Both career fairs give attendees the opportunity to create professional contacts and secure interviews with employers from several different industries including science, technology, business, government and healthcare.

“According to recent ECU student survey responses, 93 percent of students that attended a previous career fair discovered at least one employer related to their major or career interests,” said Patrick Roberts, associate director for ECU Career Services. “This shows that we provide a diverse collection of employment opportunities that matches the over 120 majors available at ECU. Our goal is to create opportunities for students to establish relationships with employers that directly relate to their career goals.”

Participating companies at these career fairs include American Tower Corporation, Aramark, Barnhill Contracting Company, BB&T Corporation, Cisco, Credit Suisse, e-Emphasys Technologies, Enterprise Holdings, GEICO, Greenville Utilities Commission, Honda North America South HUB, Horace Mann, Hyster-Yale Group, Lincoln Financial Group, Motion Industries, NAVAIR, NetApp, Novo Nordisk, Patheon, Peace Corps, Peter Millar, T.A. Loving Company, UTC Aerospace Systems, Vidant Health and Youth Villages.

For more information and suggestions on how to prepare for the Career Fairs, visit the Career Services website at www.ecu.edu/career.

 

-Contact: Tom Halasz, director for ECU Career Services, Halaszt18@ecu.edu, 252-328-6050

Make-a-thon inspires innovation

East Carolina University students brought new ideas and innovations to the university’s BrainSTORM make-a-thon event on Oct. 4, offering fresh perspectives to problems that plague communities after natural disasters.

Nearly 60 students attended the seven-hour event at the university’s Innovation Design Lab, exploring problems encountered by families, businesses and first responders, and prototyping solutions to those challenges.

East Carolina University alumnus Magus Pereria tests a laser sensor that detects the depth of water at the university’s make-a-thon event. The event brought students and mentors together to develop ideas to combat challenges that arise from natural and man-made disasters.

East Carolina University alumnus Magus Pereria tests a laser sensor that detects the depth of water at the university’s make-a-thon event. The event brought students and mentors together to develop ideas to combat challenges that arise from natural and man-made disasters. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

ECU innovators developed plans to provide power through interchangeable batteries to those affected by power outages during disasters; investigated how they could collect and distribute data during disasters using existing infrastructure that could help inform emergency management decision making; and worked on sensors that could detect food spoilage during disaster events.

Senior Austin Rabah, a business management major, said he learned about BrainSTORM through one of his classes.

“This was my first time attending such an event,” Rabah said. “Because of it, I was able to come out of my comfort zone to try to help hurricane victims. I learned a lot about technology development, more specifically the actual amount of work that goes into creating items that could make a difference (in a time of need).”

The make-a-thon, hosted by ECU’s Miller School of Entrepreneurship, Innovation Design Lab, and Division of Research, Economic Development and Engagement, was broken into three sessions. During the morning session, students learned about disaster response and recovery basics during both natural and man-made disasters. The afternoon session saw students split into teams and identify potential disaster issues before building a prototype or business plan in the afternoon session.

Pereira and David Mayo, right, work on the laser sensor during the make-a-thon event.

Pereira and David Mayo, right, work on the laser sensor during the make-a-thon event.

While hurricane relief weighed heavy on the minds of many students, the prototypes developed by the participants weren’t only storm related. A major component of the event was producing solutions that could be used in many types disasters, whether they be hurricanes, floods, earthquakes or even terrorist attacks.

“I believe they learned a lot about the innovation process and how entrepreneurship can help others,” said David Mayo, a teaching instructor with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship and BrainSTORM coordinator. “One day these students may create ventures that can make an impact on their community and the world. It’s not just about making money, it’s about doing good.”

Mayo said the students worked diligently on solutions that could scale beyond just the Greenville community.

“They saw that they can make a big impact in their community by working toward solutions to tough problems, but we really wanted them to think about the big picture,” he said. “Our students can create solutions that really scale. They don’t have to just help in one or two disasters, they can be used across the globe to help a lot of people.”

Rabah agreed and hopes that in the future, even more ECU students will participate in events like the make-a-thon and share their potential ideas.

“I think the make-a-thon was extremely beneficial for all students,” Rahab said. “I really think we should market the event to everyone on campus, not just for business majors, but for everyone who might have even the slightest inclination to help.”

Learn more about how you can help victims of Hurricane Florence at East Carolina Undaunted.

The laser sensor detects the depth of water.

The laser sensor detects the depth of water.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

ECU to offer part-time hybrid master of social work degree program

Beginning in May, East Carolina University’s School of Social Work will offer a part-time hybrid program for people interested in earning a master of social work degree.

The three-year program will include online, hybrid, and some face-to-face classes that will be held 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays on the ECU campus. The program starts May 13, 2019.

ECU students in the School of Social Work discuss their program with members of the HHP Advancement Council in the Rivers Building.

ECU students in the School of Social Work discuss their program with members of the HHP Advancement Council in the Rivers Building. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

Prospective ECU students must apply for admission by Jan. 8 to be considered for the program. More information is at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/gradschool/Admissions-Information.cfm.

Requirements for admission into the MSW program include: a bachelor’s degree from an accredited undergraduate institution; a satisfactory GPA; a satisfactory score on either the MAT or the GRE unless a test waiver is granted; and a broad-based liberal arts foundation with a minimum of six courses in basic social and behavioral science. An advanced standing pathway for BSW graduates and a regular pathway for other undergraduate majors will be offered.

A part-time Rocky Mount class will begin in May 2020, while a part-time New Bern class will begin in May 2021. Each will be hybrid, take three years to complete, and will include some Saturday classes.

For more information on the MSW program and admission procedures, contact the ECU School of Social Work at 252-328-5650, visit the website at https://hhp.ecu.edu/socw/msw/ or email msw@ecu.edu.

 

-Contact: Paige Averett, director of graduate programs, ECU School of Social Work, averettp@ecu.edu, 252-328-4193

Student event at ECU combines innovation, hurricane relief

An event geared toward students aims to bring innovative ideas to disaster relief efforts as eastern North Carolina continues to recover from the effects of Hurricane Florence.

On Thursday, Oct. 4, East Carolina University will host BrainSTORM, a “make-a-thon” exhibition that brings student teams together for a seven-hour period to create products to help communities recover after natural disasters. During the session, students will explore problems encountered by families, businesses and first responders during natural disasters, create ideas to solve those problems and develop prototypes for potential solutions.

Modeled after popular “hack-a-thons,” BrainSTORM will challenge student innovation by providing tools and resources for creative problem solving around specific needs.

The event is hosted by ECU’s Miller School of Entrepreneurship, Innovation Design Lab, and Division of Research, Economic Development and Engagement.

David Mayo, a teaching instructor with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship and leader for BrainSTORM, said the event offers a unique opportunity for students to positively impact distressed regions in eastern North Carolina.

“This event is important because it allows students to create scalable solutions that can impact many lives,” Mayo said. “When we think of disaster recovery, many times we think about cutting tree limbs or handing out water bottles. However, if we can come up with creative solutions to help with disaster prevention, make logistics more efficient in flooded areas, or create early warning systems, we can improve outcomes for many instead of a few.”

Faculty members will be on hand to guide students through the creation process and provide technical development expertise, if needed.

BrainSTORM will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at ECU’s Innovation Design Lab at Suite 100, 211 S. Jarvis St.

Students can register online; however registration is not required to participate.

 

What: BrainSTORM Make-A-Thon

When: Thursday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Where: Innovation Design Lab, Suite 110, 211 S. Jarvis St.

 

-Contact: Matt Smith, University Communications, smithmatt17@ecu.edu or 252-737-5423

Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge announces dates, additional prize money

East Carolina University’s Miller School of Entrepreneurship has announced the dates for the second annual Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge, a three-round pitch competition available to any ECU student in the 2018-19 academic year and alumni who have an enrolled ECU student on their team.

ECU Junior Taylor Hicks, right, owner of Simple & Sentimental, participated in last year’s inaugural Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge. She eventually moved on to take first place in the competition.

ECU Junior Taylor Hicks, right, owner of Simple & Sentimental, participated in last year’s inaugural Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge. She eventually moved on to take first place in the competition. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

More than $75,000 in cash and in-kind services will be awarded to the top three winners. The grand prize winner will receive $15,000 in cash. Second place will receive $10,000 and third place will take home $5,000 in prize money.

ECU student Taylor Hicks and her company, Simple and Sentimental, won first place in last year’s inaugural challenge, which handed out $20,000 in cash prizes.

“The increase in award money and the new in-kind, donated services are some of many reasons we’re excited about this year’s challenge,” said Dr. Mike Harris, director of the Miller School of Entrepreneurship.

Round one will take place Oct. 11 from noon to 2 p.m. in the brickyard between Joyner Library and Mendenhall Student Center on main campus. Based on popular vote and input from ECU representatives, 12 teams will move on to round two, which is Nov. 15, 5-7 p.m. at the ECU Heart Institute. The six teams chosen to participate in the final round will receive $2,000. The final round will be held in February during National Entrepreneurship Week. The date and time will be announced later.

Cash and in-kind services will be provided by:

  • Albea Law
  • Coffman’s Menswear
  • Greenville SEED@ECU
  • Instigator
  • Jenkins, Wilson, Taylor, Hunt
  • Kellam and Campbell
  • Pitt County Development Commission
  • Red Shark Digital
  • Uptown Greenville

“We’re trying to build an entrepreneurial ecosystem here in eastern North Carolina,” said Harris. “The more companies we can work with to participate in the challenge, the more we can entice ECU students, from both the east and west campuses, to participate, get involved and cultivate their ideas into realities.”

For teams interested in competing, an information session will be held Sept. 27 in Bate 1300 from 5:30-6:15 p.m.

To learn more about the second annual Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge, visit www.business.ecu.edu/msoe/pec.

The dates of the second annual Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge have been announced. Prizes total more than $75,000.

The dates of the second annual Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge have been announced. Prizes total more than $75,000.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

ECU recognized for diversity and inclusion

For the seventh consecutive year, East Carolina University has been recognized for its commitment to diversity and inclusiveness by receiving the Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) award.

The HEED award is sponsored by Insight into Diversity magazine and recognizes colleges and universities in the U.S. that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion. The 2018 award winners were selected for initiatives that focus on all aspects of diversity including gender, race, ethnicity, veterans, people with disabilities and members of the LGBTQ community.

“Receiving this award for the seventh consecutive year recognizes the continuing efforts and successes of our collective work around diversity and inclusion,” said LaKesha Forbes, associate provost for Equity and Diversity. “We strive to maintain an increasingly diverse and welcoming environment for our faculty, staff and students. Diversity is strength and inclusion leads to excellence, and we are strong in our endeavor toward excellence.”

ECU is one of six institutions in the UNC system to receive the 2018 HEED award.

“At ECU we are dedicated to being a community that is reflective of a globally diverse workplace for students and employees. I am proud that we are once again being recognized for our commitment to build an inclusive community where we value our differences,” said ECU Chancellor Cecil Staton.

Several groups and programs specifically address diversity and inclusion at ECU, and three of these programs were included in ECU’s 2018 application for the HEED award. The following programs highlight opportunities available for students and employees to promote inclusiveness through research, education and outreach:

Diversity and Inclusion Research and Scholarship (DIRS) Program

The DIRS Program is a faculty development and seed grant program that provides funds to departments with faculty who engage in research projects related to diversity, equity, inclusion and/or cultural competence. Faculty members may apply for financial assistance for either diversity-related research expenses and/or reassignment from teaching assignments for up to one academic year.

Multicultural Appreciation Day Experience (MADE)

In collaboration with Undergraduate Admissions, MADE at ECU gives current high school students an opportunity to see how they can benefit from an exceptional education and wonderful social experience at ECU. It offers high school students the chance to meet with current ECU students and faculty, learn how to apply and pay for their education, explore scholarship opportunities and learn about the many different majors offered at ECU.

Valuing Inclusion Program (VIP)

VIP provides educational opportunities for open dialogue of beliefs and values and to develop skills to create an inclusive community at ECU. This program promotes an inclusive and respectful working, living and learning environment. It brings awareness to the experiences of people with intersecting marginalized identities and aids in developing skills to effect positive change and promote inclusivity.

“The HEED Award process consists of a comprehensive and rigorous application that includes questions relating to the recruitment and retention of students and employees — and best practices for both — continued leadership support for diversity, and other aspects of campus diversity and inclusion,” said Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of Insight into Diversity magazine. “We take a detailed approach to reviewing each application in deciding who will be named a HEED Award recipient. Our standards are high, and we look for institutions where diversity and inclusion are woven into the work being accomplished every day across their campus.”

ECU will be featured along with the 95 other recipients in the November issue of Insight into Diversity magazine.

ECU’s Brody School of Medicine welcomed the most diverse class of medical students in history this year.

ECU’s Brody School of Medicine welcomed the most diverse class of medical students in history this year. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

 

-by Jamie Smith, ECU News Services

Public health student attends Harvard program

An East Carolina University student with an interest in health disparities took classes and conducted research through a prestigious Harvard University program this summer.

Kristin Coleman, a senior public health studies major concentrating in community health with a minor in economics, was one of 15 accepted into the 2018 FACETS program in Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

“I wanted to participate in Harvard’s program because their School of Public Health is one of the top schools in the nation in my field,” Coleman said. “I wanted to have the opportunity to connect with some of the top leaders in public health, network with students from other universities and develop a stronger research skillset.”

Kristin Coleman, a senior public health studies major concentrating in community health with a minor in economics, was one of 15 accepted into the 2018 FACETS program in Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Kristin Coleman was one of 15 accepted into the 2018 FACETS program in Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (Contributed photo)

Over six weeks in Boston, Coleman conducted research on delayed health care among low-income populations because of costs, bills and insurance. Working with mentors in the Department of Health Policy and Management, she created a poster to present at the end of the program where she had the opportunity to talk with students and Harvard professors about her research.

While there, she took courses in biostatistics, epidemiology, and social and behavioral sciences. She also learned more about graduate school, took an intensive GRE prep course and attended evening lectures.

“Through this experience, I learned so much about public health from the perspectives of others,” Coleman said. “I learned about what other students in my cohort were passionate about, which ranged from food deserts, access to health care and refugee health. We had so many conversations and everyone wanted to make some impact in the field of public health.”

She said her instructors challenged her to think deeper. “For example, if I answered a question incorrectly, I was asked why I answered it that way and then I was corrected. If I answered a question correctly, I had to explain why it was right. I was taught to go beyond the surface and not just settle for what is given to me, but to think through it,” Coleman said.

Coleman said ECU and her College of Health and Human Performance faculty mentor, Dr. Deeonna Farr, prepared her for the summer program in several ways. “She taught me the nuts and bolts of research, helped me with my summer program applications, and allowed me to grow as a student and researcher,” Coleman said. “ECU has allowed me to grow in other areas which help me make an impact in the world.”

After graduation this spring, Coleman plans to work in health care but ultimately wants to obtain a doctorate of public health. “I want to always learn and never stop growing,” said the Durham native.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Horizon LLC kicks off first week

Eighteen East Carolina University freshmen dipped their toes into the world of entrepreneurship last month as part of the university’s newest living learning community.

The Horizon Living Learning Community – one of ECU’s thematic communities designed to assist new Pirates during their transition to college – offers students the opportunity to explore and develop creative, innovative entrepreneurial responses to community needs. Students from different academic backgrounds, including biomedical science, education, engineering and business pathways, to name a few, live on the fourth floor of Gateway Hall – East.

A group of Horizon LLC students build a raft as part of a team-building exercise at Cable Paradise Park in Ayden.

A group of Horizon LLC students build a raft as part of a team-building exercise at Cable Paradise Park in Ayden. (Photos contributed by Horizon LLC)

While in the program, Horizon LLC students will participate in courses that focus on entrepreneurship, money management and business development before launching a microenterprise venture in their final year.

Although their reasons for joining the program differ, expressing their creativity and having a chance to help others were common themes for students seeking out the Horizon LLC.

“I was initially drawn to Horizon because I have been dedicated full time to giving back to the community – especially to causes in North Carolina – since I began my charitable organization, Art For Unity Charlotte,” freshman D’Mya Sanford said. “I’ve held several charity art shows, managing about 30-40 people at a time and donating to charities including Safe Alliance, NAMI-Charlotte and No Kid Hungry N.C. I’d like to use these skills to benefit communities around eastern North Carolina as well.”

ECU student Katherine Foster said she believes the program will provide her a creative outlet.

“In high school, I had a lot of big ideas and was involved in Project Lead the Way courses that allowed me to showcase my creative side,” she said. “I wanted somewhere I could use that creativity at ECU. I thought the Horizon LLC looked really exciting because it was an outlet I could share my ideas and make something meaningful out of them.”

Along with a traditional undergraduate degree, Horizon LLC students have the chance to earn an entrepreneurship certificate from the Miller School of Entrepreneurship. Students will also participate in National Science Foundation I-Corps training, network with other students and faculty, and meet with local business leaders.

“I think the Horizon LLC will expand my boundaries and enrich my experience at ECU,” Foster said. “We can talk to anyone in the LLC about their courses and what they’re taking; it’s going to help me get a better feel for college. Being a part of the LLC is going to give me opportunities to talk to others, practice my communication skills and forge connections before I get into a specific academic program.”

Provost’s message

In the LLC’s first student development course Aug. 22, Provost Ron Mitchelson discussed the importance of ECU’s mission to serve rural communities and how students can aid economic development by creating new businesses in the region.

“When you sign up for something like this, you’re not only going to be experts in the field, but you’re going to be doers,” Mitchelson said. “You’re going to use your creativity and knowledge to do good things.

“We believe that you’re going to be the future drivers of regional transformation and job creation in the region,” he said. “We don’t want you to have to leave here to work somewhere; we want you to stay here and be the ones to create the jobs. Don’t search for a job; build one. It’s an entirely different mindset, but one that I believe this community will accept, adopt and deploy during your four years here.”

ECU Provost Ron Mitchelson discusses regional transformation and economic development opportunities with students from Horizon, ECU’s newest living and learning community on the fourth floor of Gateway Hall – East.

ECU Provost Ron Mitchelson discusses regional transformation and economic development opportunities with students from Horizon, ECU’s newest living and learning community on the fourth floor of Gateway Hall – East.

Students also took part in team-building activities during their first week on campus, including meeting an ECU alumnus entrepreneur and a trip to Cable Paradise Park in Ayden. Students built homemade boats out of cardboard and duct tape, breaking the ice with their fellow community members before ever setting foot in a classroom.

Sanford said she’s already seeing a stark difference between high school and college life, but believes the LLC has been beneficial to her transition.

“College has given me a large amount of pseudo-free time because my classes don’t take up as much time as they did in high school,” she said. “However, the studying, social interactions, blocking out time to eat and sleep take up all of the ‘extra’ spare time I thought I had. My first week in the LLC has been very informative. Without the first few days of informational sessions and activities, I don’t think I would have known about the services and resources offered at ECU.”

Learn more at http://blog.ecu.edu/sites/horizonllc/contact/.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Tickets on sale for ECU’s annual performing arts series 

Tickets for the 56th season of East Carolina University’s S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series are now on sale.

The series is known for bringing classical, pops and dance attractions to eastern North Carolina.

The series opens Oct. 11 with an improvisatory comedic troupe performing “Broadway’s Next H!T Musical.” The performance, a mashup between the Tony Awards and “Whose Line is it Anyway?,” is audience-driven. Audience members place fake song titles into a fish bowl before the show begins. Actors will select titles, improvise a song based on the title, and allow the audience to select the best presentation to win a fake award. In Act II, the troupe transforms the song into a full—fake and improvised—musical.

Sons of Serendip

Sons of Serendip (Contributed photo)

Fans of the television program “America’s Got Talent” can hear an audience favorite, Sons of Serendip, perform selections from their album “Christmas Beyond the Lights” on Nov. 29. The four musicians met in graduate school, and through a series of serendipitous events, found their way to stages across the nation with their unique instrumentation and soulful treatment of contemporary and pops masterworks.

This season’s marquee attraction is Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the conductor-less 28-member ensemble with 70 recordings and multiple Grammy Awards to its credit. The Jan. 10 program will include Mozart’s last Piano Concerto No. 27, featuring Spanish pianist Javier Perianes.

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra

On Jan. 31, the innovative sextet Mélange will ask the audience to select its program. Each guest will receive a numbered program. The musicians use a randomizer to pick an audience member who will then select the next piece to be performed. All of the pieces—transcriptions of classical masterpieces, jazz, tango and musical theatre—are between three and six minutes in duration, so the concert moves quickly and feels like the “shuffle” setting on an iPod.

Melange

Melange

Luca Stricagnoli

Luca Stricagnoli

International Guitar Night will be held Feb. 10. The Youtube sensation Luca Stricagnoli will perform arrangements of heavy metal and rock songs on a three-necked instrument. Sharing the stage will be the French Swing sensation Antoine Boyer, Flamenco master Samuelito and the Turkish fretless guitar master Cenk Erdogan.

The quartet M5: Mexican Brass, known for vibrant performances and showmanship, will perform Feb. 28. The group is considered one of the foremost brass quintets in the world, pairing world-class musicianship with comedic presentation.

On March 14, the dance-theatre troupe Lucky Plush Productions will perform a new work, “Rooming House,” featuring a physically and psychologically complex game of “whodunit” and stories of people whose actions resulted in potentially devastating consequences.

The series features one added attraction, VOCES8, an a cappella ensemble from Britain. The Nov. 15 program ranges from early work, including polyphony, and runs through the contemporary, such as Van Morrison’s “Moondance.” The performance will be held at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in downtown Greenville.

All other performances will be held in ECU’s Wright Auditorium. Individual tickets, season passes and Pick-5 subscriptions and parking credentials are available now. Visit www.ecu.edu/srapas or call ECU Arts at 252-737-5444.

Individuals requesting accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should contact the Department for Disability Support Services at least 48 hours prior to the event at 252-737-1016(voice/TTY).

International Guitar Night will be held Feb. 10.

International Guitar Night will be held Feb. 10.

At a glance

All performances will be held at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium unless otherwise noted. Individual tickets are $15-$55.

Broadway’s Next H!T Musical, Oct. 11

VOCES8 (added attraction), Nov. 15, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church

Sons of Serendip, Nov. 29

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, Jan. 10

Mélange, Jan. 31

International Guitar Night, Feb. 10, matinee performance only, at 4 p.m.

M5: Mexican Brass, Feb. 28

Lucky Plush Productions, March 14

 

-Contact: Michael Crane, CRANEMI@ecu.edu, 252-328-5386

1 2 3 37