Category Archives: Students

ECU takes third in NASA rover challenge

Five College of Engineering and Technology students recently competed and won third place in the 2018 Human Exploration Rover Challenge. The April event, which was held in Huntsville, Alabama, was sponsored by Marshall Space Flight Center and U.S. Space & Rocket Center.

According to a NASA news release, the competition challenged high school and college teams to design, build and test human-powered roving vehicles inspired by the Apollo lunar missions and future exploration missions to the moon, Mars and beyond. This year’s competition challenged teams to complete 14 obstacles and five tasks throughout a half-mile course, with a six-minute supply of “virtual” oxygen.

From left, Morgan Watkins, Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam (advisor), Andrew Grena, Jameson Morris and Evan Diener (sitting). Not pictured: Tanner Guin. (Contributed photos)

From left, Morgan Watkins, Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam (advisor), Andrew Grena, Jameson Morris and Evan Diener (sitting). Not pictured: Tanner Guin. (Contributed photos)

ECU competed against 64 colleges and universities in the Human Exploration Rover Challenge.

ECU competed against 63 colleges and universities in the Human Exploration Rover Challenge.

The obstacles simulated the terrain found throughout the solar system, and the tasks challenged teams to collect and return samples, take photographs and plant a flag. Teams had to decide which tasks and obstacles to attempt or bypass before their clock expired.

ECU’s team competed against 63 other universities and colleges. They were the only team to complete the entire obstacle course. The team included juniors Evan Diener, Andrew Grena, Tanner Guin, Jameson Morris and Morgan Watkins. Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam served as the faculty advisor.

“The goal was for these students to take what they learned and apply it to future competitions,” said Abdel-Salam.

Students in the team are members of the college’s American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The team’s participation in the competition was made possible by the North Carolina Space Grant.

This year marked the second time an ECU team participated in the event.

ECU juniors from the College of Engineering and Technology built a human-powered roving vehicle that had to handle simulated terrain found throughout the solar system.

ECU juniors from the College of Engineering and Technology built a human-powered roving vehicle that had to handle simulated terrain found throughout the solar system.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

New focus for lab courses introduced

Instead of repeating tried-and-true experiments in their science laboratory courses, university and community college students in eastern North Carolina will soon be learning and conducting science in a more interactive, engaging way.

That’s thanks to new way of leading student laboratory courses called X-Labs. Science educators from East Carolina University and area community colleges learned about the concept May 9 at the X-Labs Summer Symposium at ECU.

Traditionally, instructors teach lab courses in a “cookbook style,” said Joi Walker, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry. Students follow steps, collect data and move on to their next assignment.

Joi Walker, assistant professor of chemistry, discusses the X-Labs concept to a group of educators during a summer symposium in the Science and Technology Building on May 9. (Photos by Rhett Butler)

Joi Walker, assistant professor of chemistry, discusses the X-Labs concept to a group of educators during a summer symposium in the Science and Technology Building on May 9. (Photos by Rhett Butler)

The X-Labs model is a cross-disciplinary, practice-focused model that changes the structure of standard lab courses. Instead of following a set design, students will be a part of the design process while also working with larger teams to create written lab reports and poster presentations.

The program’s goal is to increase student’s ability to engage in science practices between and across disciplines, bringing together a common lab structure and language for undergraduate students.

“Today, we’re introducing the new path we’re headed toward with our lab courses,” Walker said. “We want the leaders in our scientific disciplines to know about the changes coming their way. X-Labs is a different way of doing things; we want to ensure that the campus community is aware of the program and the changes they may see in lab courses moving forward.”

The X-Labs program is a three-year project funded by a $598,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. The grant tasks X-Labs program leaders with transforming lab courses at an institutional level to better prepare undergraduate students for careers in STEM fields. X-Labs will also seek to change lab course structure at community colleges in eastern North Carolina.

East Carolina University student Meghan Lower discusses a poster on X-Labs during a summer symposium on X-Labs at the Science and Technology Building.

ECU student Meghan Lower discusses a poster on X-Labs during a summer symposium on X-Labs at the Science and Technology Building.

The ECU chemistry department is leading the change and will begin conducting courses this summer using argument-driven inquiry. Argument-driven inquiry is an instructional model featuring eight stages of scientific discovery: identifying a task and guiding question, designing a method and collecting data, developing an initial argument, hosting an argument session, conducting a reflective discussion, writing an investigative report, participating in a double-blind peer review, and revising and submitting a final report.

The biology department will follow with X-Labs implementation in the fall, with physics to follow. Walker expects all three deparmtents to have X-Labs courses running by next spring.

“X-Labs changes the culture of lab work,” Walker said. “It’s authentic science. Students are going to be taking a more active role in the lab and that’s going to be better for our students and faculty. ECU has a large undergraduate student population. Our faculty members depend on these undergraduates to help conduct research. X-Labs will better prepare these students to take on that challenge, benefiting both mentor and mentee.”

Mary Farwell, director of undergraduate research, said the program has wide-ranging implications for student research.

“The X-Labs project guides students to make connections between different lab courses,” Farwell said. “They truly learn how science is carried out by scientists. After completing X-Labs, students will be more prepared for and, I believe, more interested in, faculty-mentored undergraduate research.”

For more information on X-Labs, contact Walker at walkerjoi15@ecu.edu.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Blockfest competition gives construction students real-life experience

Blockfest, a structure building competition made possible by Oldcastle Adams, recently came to ECU, where 42 construction students participated in the daylong event.

Blockfest, a structure building competition made possible by Oldcastle Adams, recently came to ECU, where 42 construction students participated in the daylong event. (Contributed photos)

Construction management students recently competed in Blockfest, a design and craft competition in which seven teams of 42 students had to dry-stack a structure using a selection of concrete masonry units (CMU) that were provided by Oldcastle Adams products of Goldsboro.

Before competition day, the teams created an 11-by-17 presentation board that showed the plans and elevations of their proposed structures. On the day of the competition, teams had two hours to build the structures, which had to be approximately 48 inches tall and not exceed a maximum site size of 6-by-6.

Once the students completed construction of the structures, which ranged from benches to grills to firepits, industry judges reviewed the structures. The winning structure was built by Cailey Hastings (team leader), Adam Ghanayem and Andrew Dickerson.

The student team that built the winning structure included Andrew Dickerson, standing and front row, left to right, Adam Ghanayem and Cailey Hastings.

The student team that built the winning structure included Andrew Dickerson, standing and front row, left to right, Adam Ghanayem and Cailey Hastings.

Brett Hardy, vice president of sales for Oldcastle Adams, serves on the advisory board for the College of Engineering and Technology’s Department of Construction Management. He says the competition allows the students to learn more about the CMUs they’ll encounter once in the real world.

“This is the future of our industry (the students),” said Hardy. “I think it’s important for them to understand the different material types.”

Construction sophomore Nathaniel Matthewson levels sand for the base for a structure built during Blockfest.

Construction sophomore Nathanial Mathewson levels sand that served as the base for a structure built during Blockfest.

“It’s like a live lab for them to get hands-on experience,” said Dr. Amin Akhnoukh, assistant professor in construction management.

Akhnoukh said the competition is much more than building the structure. Each team had to not only supply the drawings, but also had to coordinate the purchasing and delivery of materials.

This year’s Blockfest was the third time the event has been held at ECU.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

Local company benefits from ECU innovation

Linda McMahon (Contributed photo)

Linda McMahon (Contributed photo)

National Small Business Week (NSBW) is April 30-May 5. Linda McMahon, administrator for the United States Small Business Administration and East Carolina University alumna, will wrap up a multi-city bus tour that celebrates NSBW by serving as the keynote speaker for ECU’s Spring Commencement Ceremony, which is Friday, May 4, at 7 p.m.

McMahon’s tour is an annual event that celebrates small-business owners and their key support groups. It highlights American entrepreneurship with events such as community workshops, award ceremonies and a three-day virtual conference for small-business owners.

About her participation in ECU’s commencement ceremony, McMahon said, “Whether or not they (graduates) will become part of America’s 30 million small businesses, they now have an opportunity to work hard to achieve success for themselves and to make a positive impact in their communities and beyond.”

ECU impacting small businesses

Snow Hill’s Glean is a subsidiary of Ham’s Farms, a family-owned small business that focuses on sweet potatoes and other vegetables such as beets and pumpkins, and has used many of the resources available to small businesses through ECU.

Glean’s name is what it does. It gleans, or extracts, reserve products to produce sweet potato and pumpkin flours and powder from beets. Knowing it had university resources in its backyard, Glean reached out to ECU’s Department of Nutrition Science through the university’s I-Corps NSF grant to help develop recipes for products like protein bars and smoothies in which the flours can be used. The partnership between ECU and Glean provides students, who are taking food science and marketing courses, with real-time, real-world examples for economic development and interdisciplinary collaborative learning opportunities.

Students with the College of Business present packaging research to local small business, Glean out of Snow Hill. (Contributed photos)

Students with the College of Business present packaging research to local small business, Glean out of Snow Hill. (Contributed photos)

After assisting with product development, nutrition science faculty and students brought in the College of Business’ (COB) marketing department to look at how these new products can be marketed and to whom. In the fall of 2017, student teams presented ideas to Laura Hearn and Will Kornegay. Both are co-founders of Glean. Of these initial presentations, Hearn wrote in a follow-up email, “After talking with each class, we walked away incredibly blown away by the engagement and commitment by the students. Will and I both said we would love to be able to go back to school at ECU and learn under the professors we have met.”

After the initial presentations, Glean wanted to continue its relationship with COB, just like it continues to work with the Department of Nutrition Science. Kornegay said they developed a list of projects in which the company thought the COB could provide guidance. This list resulted in project opportunities in six Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management courses.

“We met with a team of professors, kind of a roundtable discussion, and put together a scope of work of things that we were looking for as a startup, a small company, a small business,” Kornegay said.

He added the company realized it wanted to provide projects for the students to work on and give them “real-industry experience. They’re helping us accomplish a lot of things we want to do right now that we (Glean) don’t have time to do.”

Impacting students

Nicole Peters

Nicole Peters

ECU senior Nicole Peters will graduate with a degree in business administration with a marketing concentration this spring. She participated in the fall 2017 projects, as well as this spring’s Glean project, which focused on research and branding. Her team looked at ways Glean could bring an unboxing experience to its product delivery process. She said she appreciated the opportunity of working directly with the client, and, like Kornegay, she sees the value of participating in this project with Glean.

“Since they are such a new company, you (the student) are learning the whole process with them, how to utilize what you’re learning in your classes,” Peters said.

Senior Garrett Hinton of Fayetteville also was part of a student team that worked with Glean this spring. His team focused on packaging analysis and wanted to know what the consumer response was to Glean’s current packaging. Their deliverable showed Glean the consumer would like to see the actual vegetable – sweet potato, beet and pumpkin – as opposed to clip art or no art on its packaging.

Garrett Hinton

Garrett Hinton

“This (experience) means something because I’m helping a client on top of receiving a grade,” Hinton said. “It was gratifying. Not many other students can say they’re pitching ideas to a company.”

Glean also has turned to the Small Business Institute, which is part of the College’s Miller School of Entrepreneurship. Miller School director Mike Harris said both COB and College of Engineering and Technology students spent 500 hours to deliver Glean strategic and implementation plans that included analysis, objectives and issues regarding retail and budgets.

Dr. Christine Kowalczyk, associate professor in COB’s Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, highlighted the importance of this relationship for the college and students. “Our relationship with Glean is perfectly aligned with the mission of ECU. We offered unique hands-on learning projects that are preparing our students to become future business leaders. The project experience has resulted in job and internship opportunities with Glean. We look forward to continuing our support of Glean and innovating the learning opportunities for our students.”

What’s next

Hearn and Kornegay said that Glean plans to continue its relationship with ECU and COB. They see ECU as an innovator that can help other small businesses in the area.

“The professors and academia stand out among the universities that we’ve become familiar with in North Carolina and it’s right in our backyard,” said Hearn. “Any small business who is able to lean on the professors and students will gain something valuable from it.”

Glean’s Laura Hearn, left, and Will Kornegay, right, listen to students present ideas on how to package Glean products.

Glean’s Laura Hearn, left, and Will Kornegay, right, listen to students present ideas on how to package Glean products.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

Commencement week to feature Grad Bash, fireworks

East Carolina University’s Spring Commencement Ceremony will be held at 7 p.m. Friday, May 4 in Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium and will be capped off with a celebratory display of fireworks.

The keynote speaker will be Linda McMahon, head of the U.S. Small Business Administration and ECU alumna.

The spring ceremony will commemorate the accomplishments of 5,479 graduates who have completed their degrees or will do so this summer, including 3,989 undergraduate, 1,236 graduate and 254 doctoral degrees.

New this year is Grad Bash 2K18: ARRRGH You Ready! — a festival-style celebration for graduates and their families from 6-9 p.m. on Thursday, May 3 at Five Points Plaza in downtown Greenville.

“This will be a commencement week unlike any other in ECU’s 110-year history,” said Chancellor Cecil Staton. “We look forward to recognizing and applauding the hard work and accomplishments of our graduates, and we can’t wait to see where they will go from here. As they embark on the next leg of their journey, they are prepared both to fulfill their own dreams and to have a positive impact on the world and in their communities.”

Many of ECU’s colleges, schools and departments will hold unit recognition ceremonies during commencement weekend. A complete listing can be found at https://commencement.ecu.edu/.

Commencement is an outdoor ceremony and will be held rain or shine. In the unexpected event of severe weather, the university ceremony will be postponed until Saturday, May 5 at 9 a.m. Any changes to the ceremony will be communicated via ECU Alert and the ECU website (www.ecu.edu).

Visiting Fulbright scholar makes strides in disaster prevention research

Eastern North Carolina’s history with natural disasters helped draw a Fulbright research scholar to East Carolina University this semester.

Victor Oladokun is a professor of industrial engineering from the University of Ibadan in Nigeria. Since beginning his visit with ECU’s Department of Geography in December, he’s been working on developing models that help communities that are prone to flood hazards and disasters.

Victor Oladokun has been at ECU this semester through the Fulbright Scholar program. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Victor Oladokun has been at ECU this semester through the Fulbright Scholar program. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

The Fulbright program is a flagship educational and cultural exchange program that allows students, professors and researchers to study abroad in many countries.

Oladokun chose to study at ECU because of the protocols that have been put in place due to natural disasters that have affected the area in the past.

“After Floyd in 1999, Greenville and, indeed, North Carolina have carried out a lot of flood risk management and resilience initiatives that offer research interests and ECU researchers are heavily involved in those research initiatives,” he said.

As an industrial engineer, his interest in geography began by trying to cross multi-disciplinary skills to his research. He began looking at bigger socio-economic and socio-ecological challenges that have been confronting Nigeria. Geography and urban planning gave him an outlet to expand his research.

Visiting Fulbright Research Scholars Victor Oladokun studies natural disasters.

Visiting Fulbright Research Scholars Victor Oladokun studies natural disasters.

Oladokun said ECU’s geography department has been wonderful hosting him and his family and he feels that the department itself is one big family.

“The department chair, Dr. Wasklewicz, Dr. Montz, and other faculty and staff have gone extra miles to make sure we are comfortable,” he said.

Aside from being a professor, Oladokun is also the author of the book, “Essentials of Career Success: A Career Guide for Young People.” The book is a counseling guide targeting high school students on how to make life and career decisions.

“Young people from Nigeria have tremendous talent, energy and drive that can positively transform our economy and society if we can just give them some directions and show them good role models,” he said.

When he returns to Nigeria, he plans to encourage and educate his students to show interest in hazard risk management and urban resilience research.

 

-by Bre Lewis, ECU News Services

Miller School of Entrepreneurship students visit, learn from school’s namesake

In 2015, the Miller School of Entrepreneurship was established thanks to a $5 million gift from ECU College of Business (COB) alumnus Fielding Miller and his wife, Kim Grice Miller. The school’s goal is to serve as a regional hub that prepares students to take an entrepreneurial mindset and skill set into their communities.

Students with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship pitch their ideas to Raleigh-entrepreneurs, including COB Alumnus and the school’s namesake, Fielding Miller. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Students with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship pitch their ideas to Raleigh-entrepreneurs, including COB Alumnus and the school’s namesake, Fielding Miller. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Three years later, Miller School students hit the road and pitched their ideas to the school’s regional advisory councils, which include COB alumni and entrepreneurs. The council visits have included Wilmington, Greenville and Raleigh.

On April 6, students with the Miller School visited CAPTRUST Financial Advisors, the Raleigh-based independent investment research andfee-based investment advisory firm. This visit marked the first time that Miller, co-founder, chairman andCEO of CAPTRUST, was able to see Miller School students in action, which included a five-minute presentation and 30-minute Q&A session with three student teams.

Fielding Miller

Fielding Miller

When asked how it felt to see these presentations, Miller said, “I was thrilled with the visit – the student presentations were compelling and showed a lot of creativity, andthe turnout of the experienced entrepreneurs in the Raleigh area was heartwarming to see.”

The Raleigh-area entrepreneurs that Miller mentioned included members of the Miller School’s Triangle Advisory Council. Van Isley, the Triangle Advisory Council’s president, also attended the event. He recently gave $2 million to the COB that will be used to provide a space for business, engineering, technology and art students to collaborate on product innovation and entrepreneurship. The Miller School student presentations marked his first time Isley saw the student entrepreneurs in action. Of the presentations, he said the students’ energy, enthusiasm and passion was exciting and invigorating to witness.

“Several years ago I participated in one of the first shark tank presentations, which was part of a final exam for one of the senior business classes,” said Isley. “It was one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done, andit made me want to get more involved. It really speaks to the quality of students the College of Business is producing.”

Student Experiences

The Raleigh-area entrepreneurs were not the only ones in the meeting that were impressed. The participating student teams were also impressed with what they saw and heard.

CAPTRUST’s offices sit on top of the 17-story, CAPTRUST Tower in Raleigh and provide a view of Raleigh’s growing skyline. They heard from Miller, who talked about his entrepreneurial journey and his top lessons learned over the years. And, these students heard pointed, direct feedback from the entrepreneurs in the room.

Senior Chris Allen

Senior Chris Allen

Chris Allen is a pre-med computer-science major who is taking advantage of the entrepreneurial and small business management classes provided by the Miller School. He pitched a health carerelated blockchain idea during his visit.

“I never had an experience that was that invigorating, and that allowed me to learn so quickly and connect with so many people that could influence my future,” said Allen.

Brady Hillhouse of the Charlotte area is a freshman that is pursuing a double major in finance and entrepreneurship. He is already an entrepreneur who owns a foreign exchange education company.

He viewed the experience as a working lunch to receive mentorship and guidance from entrepreneurs from multiple industries. According to Hillhouse, his projected career path is very similar to Miller’s. He wants to become a stockbroker and open his own financial advisory firm, andHillhouse says what he heard at the event was valuable.

“That was justincredible feedback and mentorship on the next steps to take in life and his company,” said Hillhouse. “It’s feedback I couldn’t have gotten anywhere else even if I paid for it.”

According to Dr. Mike Harris, director of the Miller School, the April event, as well as the previousevents, were designed to help establish mentoring relationships.

“The Miller School is very fortunate to have four advisory councils with active statewide members who are willing to help nurture the next generation of entrepreneurs,” said Harris.

“I was astounded by the quantity and quality of successful entrepreneurs who were willing to give of their time, energy and experience,” said Isley.

After the event, Miller was not only pleased with what he witnessed but is excited for the future.

“I want to participate in as many as I can,” said Miller. “It is fascinating to see the students in action, and I came away more enthusiastic than ever about the potential of the program. So far, it (the Miller School) has exceeded my expectations.”

According to Harris, the Miller School will plan a similar event in Charlotte during a Fall 2018 meeting of its Piedmont Regional Advisory Council.

Van Isley, CEO and founder of Professional Builders Supply, speaks with Miller School students during their recent visit to Raleigh’s CAPTRUST.

Van Isley, CEO and founder of Professional Builders Supply, speaks with Miller School students during their recent visit to Raleigh’s CAPTRUST.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

Students attend first Social Work Career and Resource Fair

Alexis Brooks and Destiny Sanders, Bachelor of Social Work Student Association members, welcomed participants to the fair.  (Photo by Crystal Baity)

Alexis Brooks and Destiny Sanders, Bachelor of Social Work Student Association members, welcomed participants to the fair. (Photos by Crystal Baity)

East Carolina University’s School of Social Work held its first Social Work Career and Resource Fair on April 13 at the Holiday Inn in Greenville.

About 60 ECU students attended the fair, which featured 30 agencies and organizations. Following the fair, the school hosted an appreciation luncheon to thank field supervisors in the agencies and organizations for hosting student interns during the academic year.

The event was organized by LaTonya Gaskins, director of field education in the School of Social Work, and Janine Jason-Gay, assistant director.

Social work students Apriann Sutton, Brianna Best and Sydney Ferrer attended the 2018 Social Work Career and Resource Fair on April 13.

Social work students Apriann Sutton, Brianna Best and Sydney Ferrer attended the 2018 Social Work Career and Resource Fair on April 13.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Dean, student switch roles in Harriot College

One East Carolina University student recently had the opportunity to serve as “Dean for a Day” in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

Dana Shefet, an EC Scholar and Honors College freshman seeking dual degrees in mathematics and public health studies, entered and won a contest to fill in for Dean William M. Downs on April 11.

Dana Shefet begins her “Dean for a Day” experience at the dean’s desk in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences on April 11.

Dana Shefet begins her “Dean for a Day” experience at the dean’s desk in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences on April 11. (Contributed photos)

“At ECU, we are committed to shaping tomorrow’s leaders. We designed our ‘Dean for a Day’ initiative to give one talented arts and sciences student some firsthand experience with university administration,” said Downs. “Just as important for me was the chance to switch places with Dana, to walk in a student’s shoes for the day and to listen to students’ ideas for improving their educational experience. As the day turned out, it was an invaluable experience for both of us to learn about life on the other side.”

In interviewing for the opportunity to be dean, Shefet said her goals included finding ways to make students feel like more than just a number in the college and to get them engaged outside of the classroom to prepare for their careers.

“I thought ‘Dean for a Day’ would be a great idea,” said Shefet. “I was very excited and honored that I was the inaugural participant.”

Acting as dean gave Shefet and the ability to see the leadership required in running the largest and most diverse academic college at ECU.

Shefet met with the college’s staff and advisers, associate deans, professors, students, the THCAS Dean’s Student Leadership Council and ECU’s Chair of the Faculty Dr. John Stiller and Provost Ron Mitchelson.

Dean William M. Downs hosts a luncheon for Shefet’s peers in the conference room of Bate.

Dean William M. Downs hosts a luncheon for Shefet’s peers in the conference room of Bate.

“The thing that most surprised me was how many positions within the college exist, and I think if more students knew about the structure and the different people they could turn to for help besides their adviser, they could be a lot more successful,” said Shefet.

Through her experience, Shefet said she heard multiple times how the college and faculty are here to assist the students. “They are trying to learn what is best for the students for them to succeed and thrive,” she said.

While Shefet whisked between meetings across campus, Downs’ day started by joining a group of arts and sciences students for coffee at the Wright Place Starbucks. He later hosted a luncheon for Shefet’s peers in the dean’s conference room.

“I gathered so many good suggestions, and I am eager for us to get busy implementing them,” said Downs.

That afternoon, Downs attended Shefet’s Chemistry 1160 class taught by Dr. Robert Hughes.

“I had not sat in a chemistry class as a student in some 34 years,” Downs admitted. “It was both engaging and, candidly, a bit humbling. I observed a star faculty member in action, and I gained some serious appreciation for the students around me who were mastering the principles of electrochemistry.”

One of the aspects of the day that Shefet said she enjoyed most were the connections she made with the professors who really wanted her feedback.

“I can’t wait to see the college continue this in future years,” said Shefet.

Shefet is active within the Greenville and ECU communities. She is class president of Alpha Omicron, a chapter of the Gamma Sigma Sigma international service sorority; clinic volunteer at the Greenville Community Shelter; vice president of Pirates for Israel, an advocacy organization; and vice president of East Carolina Hillel, a Jewish youth group. She is a member of the Brody School of Medicine Peer Mentor Program, Alpha Epsilon Delta pre-health professions honor society and the ECU chapter of the American Medical Students Association.

Shefet will complete her degrees in 2021 before applying to medical school. Her career goal is to go into a family medical practice serving the rural populations of North Carolina.

Downs and Shefet met at the end of the day to recap the inaugural THCAS “Dean for a Day.”

Downs and Shefet met at the end of the day to recap the inaugural THCAS “Dean for a Day.”

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

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