Category Archives: Students

Students create money management and budgeting course for transitional homeless residents

A group of graduate students in the East Carolina University School of Social Work recently created a money management and budgeting course for the transitional homeless population living in Jacksonville.

Elizabeth Lehnes, Michelle Pompos, Teri-Jo Davis, Portia Adams and Casa Woodbridge decided on the project based on needs in the area. The group was mentored by ECU professor Dr. Tracey Carpenter-Aeby.

 

ECU students and money management course participants are pictured at Phillips Park in Jacksonville. (Contributed photo)

ECU students and money management course participants are pictured at Phillips Park in Jacksonville. (Contributed photo)

The students partnered with the State Employees Credit Union and Jacksonville’s Trinity Baptist Church Bible Study group to offer a “Reality of Money” simulation to about 20 course participants on Sept. 16 at Phillips Park in Jacksonville.

 

-by Crystal Baity

Project researches community resilience

Jasmine Hayes, a master’s student in East Carolina University’s Department of Public Health, has been awarded funding to study resilience in rural communities following natural disasters.

The $10,000 grant from N.C. Sea Grant and the N.C. Water Resources Research Institute will be used to conduct focus groups and ultimately improve the understanding of how individuals and communities respond after major storms, flooding and other disasters. The Disaster Resilience Program will be conducted in Pitt and Robeson counties.

Jasmine Hayes has received funding to study community resilience. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Jasmine Hayes has received funding to study community resilience. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

“We chose Pitt County because it was affected in 1999 by Hurricane Floyd, and those same communities were affected again in 2016 by Hurricane Matthew,” Hayes said. “We chose Robeson County because it’s the third-highest poverty stricken county in N.C., and also it had the highest flooding among 50 counties that were affected by Hurricane Matthew.”

Hayes is seeking members of the community to share their experiences.

“From those focus groups we want to allow people a voice that they may not have had to speak and tell their story, so that we can better assess community leaders and those programs that provide assistance and help to people who have been affected by hurricanes and disasters,” she said. “We wanted to get the perspective of community members that have been affected, to get a better understanding of what they’ve gone through, the struggles, how they feel like things could be improved for future disasters in our community.”

Suzanne Lea, associate professor in the Department of Public Health, said the study will help to articulate the perceptions and behaviors that influence how people adapt after a flooding event.

“Collectively, we aim to understand how individual resilience contributes to community resilience,” she said. “At the conclusion of this project, residents of eastern North Carolina will have helped identify strategies that enhance recovery from flooding events.”

The project’s findings will be shared with local governments and aid agencies to help in shaping response efforts for future flooding events.

For more information or to participate in the focus groups, contact Hayes at 252.744.2629.

 

-by Jules Norwood

Prominent magazine editor chosen as 2017 Professional-In-Residence

ECU Student Media and the School of Communication are pleased to announce that magazine editor Joanna Citrinbaum Zerlin has been selected as the 2017 Professional-In-Residence.

Zerlin’s magazine career has included desk-editing positions with Redbook, Teen Vogueand Inside TV.

The Professional-In-Residence is a two-day program that includes visits with School of Communication journalism classes and a workshop with staff members from Student Media.

Zerlin will also be the keynote speaker at the North Carolina Scholastic Media Association Workshop hosted by the School of Communication on Oct. 12. The workshop attracts high school journalists from across the region.

The Professional-In-Residence Program started in 2014 and has included Chris Korman, senior editor at USA Today, and Sara Ganim, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for CNN.

“Joanna’s experience in the magazine industry, including editing and fact-checking, as well as her roots in student journalism, make her a particularly relevant guest this year,” said John Harvey, ECU Student Media director.

Zerlin graduated from Penn State University in 2005 with bachelor’s degrees in journalism and women’s studies. She worked as a reporter and a copy editor at The Daily Collegian, the Penn State student-run newspaper, where Harvey served as her adviser. In her senior year she also served as the editorial intern at Cosmopolitan.

After graduation, Joanna participated in a two-week copy-editing residency at the University of Central Florida in preparation for her Dow Jones Newspaper Fund internship that summer at The Palm Beach Post.

Joanna began her magazine career in 2005 as a freelance copy editor at Inside TV (produced by TVGuide) and later landed a position as copy editor at Redbook. Three years later, then a senior copy editor, she left that publication for nycgo.com, New York City’s official tourism and marketing website. She started out as a freelance copy editor, then served as copy editor and later senior copy editor, and copyedited and fact-checked content for the Webby Award–winning site for more than four years. She returned to the magazine industry to be copy chief at Teen Vogue, a position she held for three years.

For additional information, contact Dr. Mary Tucker-McLaughlin at 252-737-1559 or John Harvey, ECU Student Media director, 252-328-9234.

 

Contact: John Harvey, ECU Student Media director, 252-328-9234 or Dr. Mary Tucker-McLaughlin, ECU School of Communication, 252-737-1559

ECU students donate $4,723.50 to Hurricane Harvey and Irma relief efforts

ECU students stepped up to make a difference with hurricane relief efforts for communities directly impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. 530 ECU students donated from their dining plan on Sept. 19-20 and raised $4,723.50 that will go directly to hurricane relief efforts.

Partners include the ECU Residence Hall Association (RHA), Elite Pirates, the Campus Living Community Service Team, Campus Living and Dining Services.

Hurricane relief effort tables were set up at Todd Dining Hall, West End Dining Hall and in front of Dowdy Student Stores at Wright Plaza. Students could make a donation of up to $10 using their Purple or Gold Bucks.

All students with ECU meal plans receive Purple or Gold Bucks loaded on their ECU OneCard depending on whether they live on or off campus. Purple and Gold Bucks are pre-paid debit type accounts that are associated with corresponding meal plans. They are spent dollar for dollar.

Now that the collection totals are complete, ECU Dining Services will provide that amount to Aramark, the food service provider for ECU. The total ECU donations will be split and distributed to one college or university in Texas and one in Florida.

These respective universities will purchase items through Aramark on their campuses to help aid in the recovery process of their community. After the items are purchased, ECU Campus and Aramark will then evenly transfer the funds generated from this fundraising event to the universities involved.

For additional information, email Troy Nance, Residence Hall Association president, at rhapresident@ecu.edu or Morgan Randolph, Elite Pirates vice president, at randolphm14@students.ecu.edu.

 

Contacts: Troy Nance, Residence Hall Association president, rhapresident@ecu.edu; Morgan Randolph, Elite Pirates vice president, randolphm14@students.ecu.edu

Brody students help transform medical education

Faculty at ECU’s Brody School of Medicine have made national news in recent months because of their contributions toward transforming medical education around high quality, team-based, patient-centered care. Brody’s innovative curriculum is what led the American Medical Association in 2013 to award the school $1 million to help lead their national Accelerating Change in Medical Education (ACME) initiative.

Now Brody students are getting noticed for doing their part too. Several recently traveled to Ann Arbor, Michigan, to attend the AMA’s student-led ACME consortium, which brought together medical students from across the country to address key challenges in medical education.

Brody students presented several posters on topics ranging from second-year curriculum optimization to student-led implementation of tablet use in the clinical education setting.

Students attend the AMA conference. (Contributed photo)

Students attend the AMA conference. (Contributed photo)

“As one of the smaller schools represented at the conference, the imprint our students had on the conference was quite impressive,” said Dr. Jill Sutton, a clinical Ob/Gyn professor at ECU and the group’s faculty representative at the event.

Third-year student Zach Frabitore gave an oral presentation about developing and implementing interdisciplinary mock disaster exercises like the ones Brody students held the past two years. Frabitore said his presentation resonated with other students, and many approached him throughout the day to discuss it further.

“I think we left the conference having made a very clear and loud statement about our student body at Brody,” said Frabitore. “We were able to articulate the commitment to student leadership and intimate faculty-student relationships that encourage innovation at our home institution.

“Many students were [surprised] when we spoke about how we could pick up the phone and make personal calls to our faculty to discuss project ideas and receive advice from mentors who knew us on a personal level.”

“The school’s commitment to student participation in curricular governance and feedback that informs future decisions is a high value for Brody,” said Dr. Elizabeth Baxley, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. “The enhanced opportunities we have had in recent years to invest more substantially in student leadership development and to more formalize their contributions to educational and clinical scholarship are already paying off – for the students and the institution. Additionally, it has increased Brody’s national reputation and brought attention to the great work that has been happening here for many years. Everyone wins in that scenario!”

For more information about Brody’s involvement in the AMA initiative to transform medical education visit ecu.edu/cs-dhs/medicaleducation/reach/.

 

-by Angela Todd, University Communication

ECU unveils official class ring designs

ECU Alumnus, Neil Dorsey, shows off his 1965 ECU class ring (right) compared to the new official signet ring. Dorsey was part of the ring committee that came up with the new designs. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

ECU Alumnus, Neil Dorsey, shows off his 1965 ECU class ring (right) compared to the new official signet ring. Dorsey was part of the ring committee that came up with the new designs. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

When alumnus Ryan Beeson looked into getting his East Carolina University class ring, he wanted something special like his dad, an N.C. State graduate, had.

“All of his friends have the same ring,” said Beeson, who served as 2016-17 Student Government Association president. “It was neat to see them when we’d go to games growing up or when they’d get together for other things, and I’d see every one of them proudly wearing that ring.”

Beeson, who received his undergraduate degree in 2015 and his master’s degree in 2017, wanted a ring that had tradition tied to it. But he learned there wasn’t one official ring at ECU; there were dozens to choose from.

Thanks to the work of a group of ECU alumni, students, faculty and staff, that’s about to change. ECU has unveiled an official collection of class rings.

The group worked with Dowdy Student Stores and a representative and artist from Jostens, the company known for its class rings.

Beeson, who was an accounting graduate student at ECU at the time, was part of the group.

“I think this is an important process that we’re going through and identifying those things that stand out the most across our campus and in the minds of Pirates, looking for things that connect different generations,” Beeson said.

“The official ring program at ECU is one of our most exciting projects, I think really in the last year that I’ve undertaken,” said Heath Bowman, associate vice chancellor for alumni relations.

Two of the three ECU Official Ring Collection designs.

Two of the three ECU Official Ring Collection designs.

The ECU Alumni Association is introducing a new event to accompany the launch of the official ring. Bowman said there was a desire to create a new tradition and lore that would surround the ring.

“What we’re excited about most of all is that this is going to bring not only a ring, but it’s going to bring a storytelling element and a tradition element to our campus,” he said.

Out of months of discussions and mock-ups, three rings have emerged. There will be traditional, signet and dinner rings. Each has a crest on the top with the university shield, a sword and ECU’s motto “Servire.” The traditional and dinner rings can have either a black or purple stone. The signet ring has the option of the emblem being blackened.

The sides of the traditional and signet rings can be personalized with campus landmarks, the skull and cross bones, or the phrases “Loyal and Bold” and “Go Pirates.”

“There’s a mix of academic and athletic options,” Bowman said. “We wanted students to have the ability to make this their ring, but we also wanted to make sure that the things that are featured on the side panels are things that most alumni and students would instantly recognize.”

An artist with Jostens worked with the ring committee to come up the new design.

An artist with Jostens worked with the ring committee to come up the new design.

To celebrate, a December 1 ceremony is planned where all of the rings purchased this fall will be placed in a treasure chest under the cupola to be guarded by ECU ROTC cadets overnight. Then on Dec. 3, those rings will be given out to their owners at an official ring ceremony.

“I think this is something that all Pirates can come together and be proud of as something that unites us together as an ECU family,” Bowman said.

To be a part of the ceremony, rings must be purchased by Homecoming weekend, Oct. 21 and 22.

Even though he already has an ECU class ring, Beeson said he’ll be getting an official one soon.

“I’ll probably trade this one in. I want the standard one so when I’m out there with my buddies in the future … we all have the same thing, that we all are part of this same shared experience at ECU,” Beeson said.

For more information or to buy an official ECU ring, visit a Dowdy Student Store or go to www.Jostens.com/ECU.

 

 

-by Rich Klindworth

ECU students donate to Hurricane Harvey and Irma relief efforts

ECU students are stepping up to make a difference with hurricane relief efforts for communities directly impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Students can donate from their dining plan on Sept. 19-20 and it will go directly to hurricane relief efforts.

Partners include the ECU Residence Hall Association (RHA), Elite Pirates, the Campus Living Community Service Team, Campus Living and Campus Dining.

Hurricane relief effort tables will be set up between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. at Todd Dining Hall, West End Dining Hall and in front of Dowdy Student Stores at Wright Plaza. Students can make a donation of up to $10 using their Purple or Gold Bucks.

All students with ECU meal plans receive Purple or Gold Bucks loaded on their ECU OneCard depending on whether they live on or off campus. Purple and Gold Bucks are pre-paid debit type accounts that are associated with corresponding meal plans. They are spent dollar for dollar.

After the two-day collection concludes, Campus Dining will total the student donations and provide that amount to Aramark, the food service provider for ECU. The total ECU donations will be split and distributed to one college or university in Texas and one in Florida.

These respective universities will purchase items through Aramark on their campuses to help aid in the recovery process of their community. After the items are purchased, ECU Campus and Aramark will then evenly “transfer” the funds generated from this fundraising event to the universities involved.

For additional information, email Troy Nance, Residence Hall Association president, at rhapresident@ecu.eduor Morgan Randolph, Elite Pirates vice president, at randolphm14@students.ecu.edu.

 

Contacts: Troy Nance, Residence Hall Association president, rhapresident@ecu.edu; Morgan Randolph, Elite Pirates, randolphm14@students.ecu.edu

ECU students promote positive change while honoring those who served on 9/11

The ECU Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement (CLCE) will kick off the Fall Week of Service on Saturday, Sept. 9 through service to the Pitt County community. During the week, CLCE will promote positive change by hosting service projects throughout Pitt County. The week will conclude on Friday, Sept. 15 with a Family Weekend Service Day.

Community partner service sites include Making Pitt Fit Community Garden, A Time for Science, MacGregor Downs Health & Rehabilitation, and River Park North.

On Monday, Sept. 11, CLCE will partner with the University Writing Center and Student Government Association to host a unique program called Design for Change. This event provides the opportunity for attendees to promote positive change in remembrance of Sept. 11, 2001. There will be four stations where participants can engage:

  • Write for Change: Participants may write letters for change they wish to see on a local, national and/or international level.
  • Design for Change: Participants may paint ECU Peace Rocks to keep or to hide around campus as reminders of peace and positive change.
  • Commit to Change: Participants may write on a chalkboard/poster board their commitment to positive change by completing the sentence, “I will commit to change by …”
  • Post for Change: Participants may take a photo with an Instagram cutout and post to social media using the hashtag #Pirates4Peace.

All volunteers and participants are encouraged to upload images to social media during the entire Fall Week of Service by using #Pirates4Peace.

ECU students, faculty and staff can learn more about Fall Week of Service and the various projects through the 9/11 Day of Service and Remembrance portal on OrgSync (https://orgsync.com/115270/chapter).

To learn more about the national 9/11 Day of Service visit http://www.911day.org/.

For additional information, contact Tara Kermiet, associate director for curricular programs in the Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement, at 252-328-1554 or via email at kermiett16@ecu.edu.

 

Contact: Tara Kermiet, associate director for Curricular Programs in the Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement, kermiett16@ecu.edu

Inaugural Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge is Live

The College of Business and its Miller School of Entrepreneurship (MSOE) wants to enhance ECU’s entrepreneurial culture.

The inaugural Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge is a three-round competition open to any student enrolled in the 2017/2018 academic year, as well as alumni who have enrolled students on their team.

Total prize money to accelerate winning business ventures is $20,000 with $12,500 going to the grand prize winner. $5,000 and $2,500 will be awarded to second and third place winners, respectively. Payment will be delivered to the winners as they achieve pre-approved milestones. Other in-kind prizes will be awarded.

The Miller School of Entrepreneurship team includes Vickie Glover, front; and in back, from left to right, Dennis Barber, Corey Pulido and David Mayo. (Contributed photo)

The Miller School of Entrepreneurship team includes Vickie Glover, front; and in back, from left to right, Dennis Barber, Corey Pulido and David Mayo. (Contributed photo)

“We are excited to bring an opportunity to all of ECU that will highlight promising student entrepreneurs across campus,” said Dr. Mike Harris, interim director of MSOE. “The students will engage with the MSOE for coaching and resources to accelerate the growth of their award-winning ideas.”

Round one is an open-air forum for participants to showcase their ideas and ventures. This poster session is Oct. 17 from 12 – 2 p.m. in the Sculpture Garden outside of Mendenhall Student Center. Student passersby will get three tickets to allocate to their idea (or ideas) of choice. Twelve teams will move on to the second round based on student popular vote and input from ECU college representatives.

Round two will feature five mentors who will choose five teams based on a five-minute pitch and responses to a three-minute Q&A session. The MSOE will mentor a team based on the popular student vote from round one. This round will take place Wednesday, Nov. 15, from 5 – 7 p.m. Location TBD. Six teams will move on to the final round.

Round three (and final round) will be held during National Entrepreneurship Week Feb. 22 from 6 – 8 p.m. in the Murphy Center. The six finalists will present a five-minute pitch followed by five minutes of Q & As. A keynote speaker will address the finalists. A panel of university and community entrepreneurship leaders will choose the winner.

Established in 2015, the MSOE serves as a regional hub for preparing students to take an entrepreneurial mindset and skillset into their communities. To date, MSOE faculty has worked with approximately 349 students and 28 business clients. Students have recorded more than 6,000 hours of fieldwork.

Student teams who want to participate in the Challenge can register here.

Additional information about the Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge can be found at the Miller School of Entrepreneurship website.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

1 2 3 29