Category Archives: Students

Visiting Fulbright scholar makes strides in disaster prevention research

Eastern North Carolina’s history with natural disasters helped draw a Fulbright research scholar to East Carolina University this semester.

Victor Oladokun is a professor of industrial engineering from the University of Ibadan in Nigeria. Since beginning his visit with ECU’s Department of Geography in December, he’s been working on developing models that help communities that are prone to flood hazards and disasters.

Victor Oladokun has been at ECU this semester through the Fulbright Scholar program. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Victor Oladokun has been at ECU this semester through the Fulbright Scholar program. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

The Fulbright program is a flagship educational and cultural exchange program that allows students, professors and researchers to study abroad in many countries.

Oladokun chose to study at ECU because of the protocols that have been put in place due to natural disasters that have affected the area in the past.

“After Floyd in 1999, Greenville and, indeed, North Carolina have carried out a lot of flood risk management and resilience initiatives that offer research interests and ECU researchers are heavily involved in those research initiatives,” he said.

As an industrial engineer, his interest in geography began by trying to cross multi-disciplinary skills to his research. He began looking at bigger socio-economic and socio-ecological challenges that have been confronting Nigeria. Geography and urban planning gave him an outlet to expand his research.

Visiting Fulbright Research Scholars Victor Oladokun studies natural disasters.

Visiting Fulbright Research Scholars Victor Oladokun studies natural disasters.

Oladokun said ECU’s geography department has been wonderful hosting him and his family and he feels that the department itself is one big family.

“The department chair, Dr. Wasklewicz, Dr. Montz, and other faculty and staff have gone extra miles to make sure we are comfortable,” he said.

Aside from being a professor, Oladokun is also the author of the book, “Essentials of Career Success: A Career Guide for Young People.” The book is a counseling guide targeting high school students on how to make life and career decisions.

“Young people from Nigeria have tremendous talent, energy and drive that can positively transform our economy and society if we can just give them some directions and show them good role models,” he said.

When he returns to Nigeria, he plans to encourage and educate his students to show interest in hazard risk management and urban resilience research.

 

-by Bre Lewis, ECU News Services

Miller School of Entrepreneurship students visit, learn from school’s namesake

In 2015, the Miller School of Entrepreneurship was established thanks to a $5 million gift from ECU College of Business (COB) alumnus Fielding Miller and his wife, Kim Grice Miller. The school’s goal is to serve as a regional hub that prepares students to take an entrepreneurial mindset and skill set into their communities.

Students with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship pitch their ideas to Raleigh-entrepreneurs, including COB Alumnus and the school’s namesake, Fielding Miller. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Students with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship pitch their ideas to Raleigh-entrepreneurs, including COB Alumnus and the school’s namesake, Fielding Miller. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Three years later, Miller School students hit the road and pitched their ideas to the school’s regional advisory councils, which include COB alumni and entrepreneurs. The council visits have included Wilmington, Greenville and Raleigh.

On April 6, students with the Miller School visited CAPTRUST Financial Advisors, the Raleigh-based independent investment research andfee-based investment advisory firm. This visit marked the first time that Miller, co-founder, chairman andCEO of CAPTRUST, was able to see Miller School students in action, which included a five-minute presentation and 30-minute Q&A session with three student teams.

Fielding Miller

Fielding Miller

When asked how it felt to see these presentations, Miller said, “I was thrilled with the visit – the student presentations were compelling and showed a lot of creativity, andthe turnout of the experienced entrepreneurs in the Raleigh area was heartwarming to see.”

The Raleigh-area entrepreneurs that Miller mentioned included members of the Miller School’s Triangle Advisory Council. Van Isley, the Triangle Advisory Council’s president, also attended the event. He recently gave $2 million to the COB that will be used to provide a space for business, engineering, technology and art students to collaborate on product innovation and entrepreneurship. The Miller School student presentations marked his first time Isley saw the student entrepreneurs in action. Of the presentations, he said the students’ energy, enthusiasm and passion was exciting and invigorating to witness.

“Several years ago I participated in one of the first shark tank presentations, which was part of a final exam for one of the senior business classes,” said Isley. “It was one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done, andit made me want to get more involved. It really speaks to the quality of students the College of Business is producing.”

Student Experiences

The Raleigh-area entrepreneurs were not the only ones in the meeting that were impressed. The participating student teams were also impressed with what they saw and heard.

CAPTRUST’s offices sit on top of the 17-story, CAPTRUST Tower in Raleigh and provide a view of Raleigh’s growing skyline. They heard from Miller, who talked about his entrepreneurial journey and his top lessons learned over the years. And, these students heard pointed, direct feedback from the entrepreneurs in the room.

Senior Chris Allen

Senior Chris Allen

Chris Allen is a pre-med computer-science major who is taking advantage of the entrepreneurial and small business management classes provided by the Miller School. He pitched a health carerelated blockchain idea during his visit.

“I never had an experience that was that invigorating, and that allowed me to learn so quickly and connect with so many people that could influence my future,” said Allen.

Brady Hillhouse of the Charlotte area is a freshman that is pursuing a double major in finance and entrepreneurship. He is already an entrepreneur who owns a foreign exchange education company.

He viewed the experience as a working lunch to receive mentorship and guidance from entrepreneurs from multiple industries. According to Hillhouse, his projected career path is very similar to Miller’s. He wants to become a stockbroker and open his own financial advisory firm, andHillhouse says what he heard at the event was valuable.

“That was justincredible feedback and mentorship on the next steps to take in life and his company,” said Hillhouse. “It’s feedback I couldn’t have gotten anywhere else even if I paid for it.”

According to Dr. Mike Harris, director of the Miller School, the April event, as well as the previousevents, were designed to help establish mentoring relationships.

“The Miller School is very fortunate to have four advisory councils with active statewide members who are willing to help nurture the next generation of entrepreneurs,” said Harris.

“I was astounded by the quantity and quality of successful entrepreneurs who were willing to give of their time, energy and experience,” said Isley.

After the event, Miller was not only pleased with what he witnessed but is excited for the future.

“I want to participate in as many as I can,” said Miller. “It is fascinating to see the students in action, and I came away more enthusiastic than ever about the potential of the program. So far, it (the Miller School) has exceeded my expectations.”

According to Harris, the Miller School will plan a similar event in Charlotte during a Fall 2018 meeting of its Piedmont Regional Advisory Council.

Van Isley, CEO and founder of Professional Builders Supply, speaks with Miller School students during their recent visit to Raleigh’s CAPTRUST.

Van Isley, CEO and founder of Professional Builders Supply, speaks with Miller School students during their recent visit to Raleigh’s CAPTRUST.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

Students attend first Social Work Career and Resource Fair

Alexis Brooks and Destiny Sanders, Bachelor of Social Work Student Association members, welcomed participants to the fair.  (Photo by Crystal Baity)

Alexis Brooks and Destiny Sanders, Bachelor of Social Work Student Association members, welcomed participants to the fair. (Photos by Crystal Baity)

East Carolina University’s School of Social Work held its first Social Work Career and Resource Fair on April 13 at the Holiday Inn in Greenville.

About 60 ECU students attended the fair, which featured 30 agencies and organizations. Following the fair, the school hosted an appreciation luncheon to thank field supervisors in the agencies and organizations for hosting student interns during the academic year.

The event was organized by LaTonya Gaskins, director of field education in the School of Social Work, and Janine Jason-Gay, assistant director.

Social work students Apriann Sutton, Brianna Best and Sydney Ferrer attended the 2018 Social Work Career and Resource Fair on April 13.

Social work students Apriann Sutton, Brianna Best and Sydney Ferrer attended the 2018 Social Work Career and Resource Fair on April 13.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Dean, student switch roles in Harriot College

One East Carolina University student recently had the opportunity to serve as “Dean for a Day” in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

Dana Shefet, an EC Scholar and Honors College freshman seeking dual degrees in mathematics and public health studies, entered and won a contest to fill in for Dean William M. Downs on April 11.

Dana Shefet begins her “Dean for a Day” experience at the dean’s desk in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences on April 11.

Dana Shefet begins her “Dean for a Day” experience at the dean’s desk in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences on April 11. (Contributed photos)

“At ECU, we are committed to shaping tomorrow’s leaders. We designed our ‘Dean for a Day’ initiative to give one talented arts and sciences student some firsthand experience with university administration,” said Downs. “Just as important for me was the chance to switch places with Dana, to walk in a student’s shoes for the day and to listen to students’ ideas for improving their educational experience. As the day turned out, it was an invaluable experience for both of us to learn about life on the other side.”

In interviewing for the opportunity to be dean, Shefet said her goals included finding ways to make students feel like more than just a number in the college and to get them engaged outside of the classroom to prepare for their careers.

“I thought ‘Dean for a Day’ would be a great idea,” said Shefet. “I was very excited and honored that I was the inaugural participant.”

Acting as dean gave Shefet and the ability to see the leadership required in running the largest and most diverse academic college at ECU.

Shefet met with the college’s staff and advisers, associate deans, professors, students, the THCAS Dean’s Student Leadership Council and ECU’s Chair of the Faculty Dr. John Stiller and Provost Ron Mitchelson.

Dean William M. Downs hosts a luncheon for Shefet’s peers in the conference room of Bate.

Dean William M. Downs hosts a luncheon for Shefet’s peers in the conference room of Bate.

“The thing that most surprised me was how many positions within the college exist, and I think if more students knew about the structure and the different people they could turn to for help besides their adviser, they could be a lot more successful,” said Shefet.

Through her experience, Shefet said she heard multiple times how the college and faculty are here to assist the students. “They are trying to learn what is best for the students for them to succeed and thrive,” she said.

While Shefet whisked between meetings across campus, Downs’ day started by joining a group of arts and sciences students for coffee at the Wright Place Starbucks. He later hosted a luncheon for Shefet’s peers in the dean’s conference room.

“I gathered so many good suggestions, and I am eager for us to get busy implementing them,” said Downs.

That afternoon, Downs attended Shefet’s Chemistry 1160 class taught by Dr. Robert Hughes.

“I had not sat in a chemistry class as a student in some 34 years,” Downs admitted. “It was both engaging and, candidly, a bit humbling. I observed a star faculty member in action, and I gained some serious appreciation for the students around me who were mastering the principles of electrochemistry.”

One of the aspects of the day that Shefet said she enjoyed most were the connections she made with the professors who really wanted her feedback.

“I can’t wait to see the college continue this in future years,” said Shefet.

Shefet is active within the Greenville and ECU communities. She is class president of Alpha Omicron, a chapter of the Gamma Sigma Sigma international service sorority; clinic volunteer at the Greenville Community Shelter; vice president of Pirates for Israel, an advocacy organization; and vice president of East Carolina Hillel, a Jewish youth group. She is a member of the Brody School of Medicine Peer Mentor Program, Alpha Epsilon Delta pre-health professions honor society and the ECU chapter of the American Medical Students Association.

Shefet will complete her degrees in 2021 before applying to medical school. Her career goal is to go into a family medical practice serving the rural populations of North Carolina.

Downs and Shefet met at the end of the day to recap the inaugural THCAS “Dean for a Day.”

Downs and Shefet met at the end of the day to recap the inaugural THCAS “Dean for a Day.”

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

I-Corps@ECU honors entrepreneurs

I-Corps@ECU recognized the work of faculty members, students and community members at its 2018 Celebration and Information Session at the East Carolina Heart Institute on April 13.

More than 30 participants, East Carolina University representatives and community partners honored the spring semester’s 26 teams.

I-Corps@ECU is funded by the National Science Foundation. The program provides budding entrepreneurs a model to reach go or no-go decisions on their business ideas by using a lean launch method. Participants identify a customer base, interview potential customers to learn about their wants and needs and reach a decision on whether to bring a product to market based on consumer feedback, market share and profitability.

East Carolina University professor Richard Baybutt describes his product, BetaSol, during the 2018 I-Corps@ECU Celebration and Information Session at the East Carolina Heart Institute. BetaSol is an e-cigarette product that delivers vitamin A to smokers to help protect their lungs from damage. (Photo by Matt Smith)

East Carolina University professor Richard Baybutt describes his product, BetaSol, during the 2018 I-Corps@ECU Celebration and Information Session at the East Carolina Heart Institute. BetaSol is an e-cigarette product that delivers vitamin A to smokers to help protect their lungs from damage. (Photo by Matt Smith)

Three teams were highlighted at the celebration, including a team led by an ECU student, an ECU professor and local business owners. The program recognized BetaSol, a product developed by professor Richard Baybutt, which provides a dose of vitamin A to smokers to help prevent lung injury; FoodMASTER, an educational curriculum that uses food to teach math, science and nutrition skills led by professor Melanie Duffrin and graduate student Allender Lynch; and Glean, a local baking flour product created by a group of entrepreneurs from “ugly” vegetables that are rejected by retail stores.

Each team discussed their journey through I-Corps@ECU and how it helped them reach decisions for their products.

I-Corp co-director Marti Van Scott said the program is a useful tool for entrepreneurs who want to explore whether their idea has a position in the marketplace.

“I-Corps will benefit anyone; whether they’re a scientist, a writer or an artist, this program is useful,” Van Scott said. “Whether you’re researching, writing a grant or have an idea for a business, it forces you to take an in-depth look at what you’re offering to see if its beneficial to the people you’re trying to serve.

“I-Corps is a great tool to help people think through the next steps of their business idea,” she said. “Often, entrepreneurs will come up with an idea, but it’s the steps after that – interviewing potential customers, identifying pain points and determining market share – where they struggle. I-Corps helps point you in the right direction.”

Teal Darkenwald, an associate professor in the School of Theatre and Dance, said she attended the event to learn more about I-Corps@ECU. Darkenwald is the founder of Ultra Barre, a barre-based supplemental dance training method that lengthens and tones muscle.

“My background has nothing to do with entrepreneurship,” Darkenwald said. “I know that’s a deficit in my training and education, so today was a great opportunity for me to learn more about business and entrepreneurship.

“It makes sense for me to learn more about where I fit in with my business and learn how to build a team,” she said. “I could do that through I-Corps. I feel like I have the research background and I have a clear idea of who my demographic is, but I could potentially participate in I-Corps and strengthen the other half of the business through what you learn in the program.”

I-Corps@ECU begins its third session this fall. For more information about the program, http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/ott/icorps.cfm.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Students attend largest, oldest French film festival in the U.S.

Students from the ECU French Club stand outside the historic Byrd Theater in Richmond, Virginia, at this year’s 26th annual French Film Festival. Pictured from left to right are Julia Beauchamp, Sadie Crockett, Jon Cockerham, Kara Hall, Chase Ottensen, Marylaura Papalas (ECU faculty representative), Gary Lavenia, Amanda Curran, Rachel Griffith and Roylanda Merricks. (Contributed photo.)

Students from the ECU French Club stand outside the historic Byrd Theater in Richmond, Virginia, at this year’s 26thannual French Film Festival. Pictured from left to right are Julia Beauchamp, Sadie Crockett, Jon Cockerham, Kara Hall, Chase Ottensen, Marylaura Papalas (ECU faculty representative), Gary Lavenia, Amanda Curran, Rachel Griffith and Roylanda Merricks.
(Contributed photo.)

Students in East Carolina University’s French Club enriched their knowledge of French culture by attending the 26thannual French Film Festival in Richmond, Virginia, March 23-25.

“For years the club has tried to make a trip happen, but it just hadn’t worked out,” said Julia Beauchamp, president of the ECU French Club. “This was a great opportunity. Rarely do you get a chance to find a Francophone activity around the North Carolina, Virginia area. What a wonderful opportunity it was to have something so significant so close to us.”

As one of the French Club officers who planned the trip, Beauchamp, who is a junior majoring in communications and minoring in French and business, said the trip offered students a new opportunity to emerse themselves in the French culture.

“This trip gave us the real-life experience of being around another language,” Beauchamp said. “It revived my energy toward learning a second language.”

The festival is one of the largest and oldest French film festivals in the United States and offered the students a unique experience.

“French films are so different than Hollywood. They keep you at the edge of your seat, and you can’t guess the ending,” said Beauchamp.

During the three-day festival, students attended films each day in the historic Byrd Theater in Richmond.

“Each student had a favorite film, but one that everyone was particularly enthusiastic about was ‘Au revoir là-haut’ [English translation: ‘See you up there’], which won 5 Césars this year – France’s equivalent of the Oscars,” said Dr. Marylaura Papalas, assistant professor of French, who attended the festival with the students.

Students also had the opportunity to interact with directors, actors and musicians involved with the films.

“Many of the students bought the novel (‘Au revoir là-haut’), on which the movie was based. They were then able to talk to the music composer, Christophe Julien, and obtain his autograph,” Papalas said. “The privilege of talking to someone involved in the production of the film as well as conversations with other actors and directors at the conference were once-in-a-lifetime experiences.”

Officers of the French Club sought and received funding from ECU’s Student Government Association and the Student Activities and Organizations’ Co-Curricular Programs to attend the event, which covered the cost of lodging and cinema passes.

 

-by Lacey Gray, University Communications

Student researchers awarded Joyner Library’s Rhem/Schwarzmann Prize

Three East Carolina University students from the Department of History in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences have been awarded Joyner Library’s ninth annual Rhem/Schwarzmann Prize for student research.

Established by Ann Schwarzmann to honor William and Emily Rhem and Theodore and Ann Schwarzmann, the Rhem/Schwarzmann Prize recognizes outstanding research papers written by sophomores, juniors and seniors at ECU.

Winners pose with Joyner Library leadership. From left to right, Sarah McLusky, outreach and instruction librarian, Anna Scott Marsh, Andrew Colton Turner, Noah S. Shuler, and Jan Lewis, director. (Contributed by Joyner Library)

Winners pose with Joyner Library leadership. From left to right, Sarah McLusky, outreach and instruction librarian, Anna Scott Marsh, Andrew Colton Turner, Noah S. Shuler, and Jan Lewis, director. (Contributed by Joyner Library)

Winning the award for first place — and a $750 prize — was Andrew Colton Turner, a 2017 graduate, for “Ordinary People, Extraordinary Events: The Experiences of Common People During the Siege and Capture of Fort Macon.”

“It’s a great honor to receive an award like this and to use these resources to do the research worthy of such an award,” said Turner.

Senior Noah S. Shuler took second place and a $500 prize for “A Struggle for Growth: The Civil War and North Carolina Religiosity.”

Junior Anna Scott Marsh received a $250 prize and third place for “Life, Labor, & Lasting Legacy: James Yadkin Joyner’s Investment in North Carolina’s Educational System.”

Eligibility criteria required students to use the library’s Special Collections, which houses manuscripts, rare books, university archives and the North Carolina Collection, as a primary source for their research.

“Joyner Library’s Special Collections contain a wealth of primary source materials relevant to every field of study,” said Joyner Library Director Jan Lewis. “We are happy to partner with ECU instructors to encourage the exploration and use of these materials by undergraduate students and to recognize excellence in student research through the Rhem/Schwarzmann prize.”

Papers could be in any field of study but had to be at least 10 pages or 2,500 words in length and submitted by Feb. 17. Entries were judged on originality, quality of research, style, documentation and overall excellence by a panel comprised of faculty and staff from the library.

“Joyner’s Special Collections offers me the opportunity to use really good primary resources located right in my backyard,” said Turner. “It’s really interesting to see how someone’s letters from Rhode Island end up in a library in North Carolina and then can be used for something I’m interested in.”

Turner said he enjoyed how easily accessible the collection is along with the controlled environment that is safe for both the user and the materials.

“When you sit down and hold something that someone 150 years before you held, it’s a totally different experience. You get a better personal connection to your topic than if you were just staring at a computer screen. It’s a full circle.”

Turner also offered advice for students who haven’t yet explored the collection.

“The special collections staff is extremely helpful, so don’t be intimidated. Requesting a document from the collection is completed online. Then all you have to do is show up and your box will be there waiting for you to do your research.”

“My favorite part of working in special collections is getting to see what students can do with our material,” said Sarah McLusky, outreach and instruction librarian in special collections. “It was a pleasure to read this year’s entries, and to hear the winners speak with such enthusiasm about their research.”

This year’s awards were made possible by the Friends of Joyner Library and the generosity of the late Ann Schwarzmann.

“Mrs. Schwarzmann would be pleased to see the enthusiasm and deep subject matter engagement by this year’s prize recipients,” said Lewis.

For more information about the awards and future participation, contact McLusky at 252-328-2444 or mcluskys16@ecu.edu.

To learn more about manuscripts and rare books, university archives, digital collections and the North Carolina Collection, visit www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/specialcollections.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

Club Baseball Team receives championship rings

They are big, sparkly and a perfect fit for national champions. The ECU Club Baseball Team received their 2017 national championship rings during a halftime ceremony at the final ECU Men’s Basketball game last month.

Members of the 2017 National Champion ECU Club Baseball Team were recognized at the last men’s basketball home game in March. (Photos by Richard L. Miller Photography)

Members of the 2017 National Champion ECU Club Baseball Team were recognized at the last men’s basketball home game in March. (Photos by Richard L. Miller Photography)

“To hear the crowd roar the way it did, it was something special,” said senior catcher and business management major Jake Merzigian.

“It was awesome! It was nice for the school to recognize us. It was good for the guys. I’m glad they got to experience it,” said head coach Ben Fox.

This is the second national championship for the club baseball team. Fox was an assistant coach on that first national championship team.

“Winning it twice makes me want to win it more,” Fox said. “We’ve got some guys from the national championship team that came back (this season) and I want to send them out just like we sent out the seniors from last year.”

Last season’s trip to the National Club Baseball Association World Series was ECU’s fourth in a row. For the players who had come so close the previous three seasons, finally winning it made these rings extra special.

Baseball players or aspiring hand models? Members of ECU’s Club Baseball Team show off their national championship rings.

Baseball players or aspiring hand models? Members of ECU’s Club Baseball Team show off their national championship rings.

“A lot of hard work man, a lot of hard work,” said star pitcher Tanner Duncan, who is now in the Houston Astros organization. Duncan was also the MVP of the world series. “It’s tough to put into words, it really is. (The ring is) something I’ll cherish for the rest of my life.”

Duncan, a 2017 kinesiology graduate, is in Florida with the Astros in their extended spring training. He hopes to get an assignment soon on where he’ll pitch this season.

“I’m proud to be a part of (ECU Club Baseball),” Duncan said. “It’s an unconventional route that I’ve taken but I wouldn’t change it for anything. The people that I’ve met, the experiences I’ve had – I’m very grateful for and I wouldn’t trade them for the world.”

Centerfielder for the championship team and current ECU MBA student Logan Sutton took the reins when it came to designing the rings. They have a big purple “ECU” written in the middle of a baseball diamond with “National Champions” on the front. Some purple stones dot the rim of the ring. On one side is “Pirates Club Baseball.” Below that is the NCBA World Series logo and “2017.” The other side has the player’s last name above the trophy logo that has their 30-4 record and the player’s number.

“When I gave the guys their rings and saw their expressions and how much they loved it … It was really amazing,” Sutton said.

The ECU Club Baseball Team is a contender once again this season. They are currently on a 10-game winning streak and are ranked number one in the nation. This weekend they are away taking on conference rivals Elon. They will be back home in Greenville April 14 and 15 to host Appalachian State.

“I’m going to put this (ring) aside for a little bit,” Merzigan said. “I’m really excited for this year.”

 

-by Rich Klindworth, ECU News Services

Annual AIMO fashion show set for April 5

In preparation for the 2017 show, Caitlyn Grubb tried on a dress in Truly Yours, a downtown boutique owned by ECU alum Erin Davis, at left, a longtime supporter of the fashion show. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

In preparation for the 2017 show, Caitlyn Grubb tried on a dress in Truly Yours, a downtown boutique owned by ECU alum Erin Davis, at left, a longtime supporter of the fashion show. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

The ECU Apparel and Interior Merchandising Organization’s 14th annual Fashion Show will be held Thursday, April 5 at 8 p.m. at Brook Valley Country Club. This year’s theme is “Into the Wild.”

Tickets are $10 for students, $20 for guests and include heavy hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Tickets can be purchased at Bostic Sugg Furniture or these participating boutiques: Truly Yours, Bevello, Catalog Connection, Shimmer, Votre, My Sister’s Closet, Escape Spa and Who is Rose. There are a limited number of tickets but any remaining seats will be available at the door.

The student-run show provides learning opportunities from communications and negotiating to event and time management and leadership skills. The fashion show also is a fundraiser which helps provide opportunities for students to attend events such as the Atlanta Apparel Mart and New York showrooms, and to learn about different careers in the industry. There are about 50 students including AIMO members and merchandising majors helping in the show.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

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