Category Archives: Students

College of Allied Health Sciences hosts first college-wide Research Day

The College of Allied Health Sciences recently held its first college-wide Research Day. The event, meant to foster inter-departmental collaboration, featured oral presentations and poster sessions from undergraduates, master’s students, Doctor of Physical Therapy students and Ph.D. candidates from the nine programs within the college.

Awards for posters and presentations were voted on by the CAHS research committee. Three People’s Choice award winners were chosen as well.

“Our first Research Day was an overwhelming success,” said Dr. Robert Orlikoff, dean of the college. “It showcased the fact that students in the College of Allied Health Sciences are not only developing the knowledge and skills to become effective evidence-based practitioners and health care workers, but are also acquiring strong skills in both basic and clinical research. I congratulate the students as well as our accomplished faculty research mentors.”

The ECU College of Allied Health Sciences recently held its first college-wide Research Day. Students from the college’s nine departments gave poster and oral presentations during morning and afternoon sessions. (Photos by Alyssa De Santis Figiel)

The ECU College of Allied Health Sciences recently held its first college-wide Research Day. Students from the college’s nine departments gave poster and oral presentations during morning and afternoon sessions. (Photos by Alyssa De Santis Figiel)

The event, held on the university’s Reading Day on April 26, was organized by Dr. Richard Willy, assistant professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, and Dr. Heather Harris Wright, professor and associate dean for research, who organized the presentations based on their subjects and theme, rather than by department.

“Every department in our college has typically done their own research day,” Willy said. “They’ve always kind of occurred in somewhat of a vacuum. So now that we’re pushing interprofessional communication, it made sense to hold them all on the same day.

“We might have someone from physical therapy standing next to someone from occupational therapy standing next to someone from clinical lab science,” Willy continued. “By seeing what our students are working on, essentially, by proxy we’re seeing what our faculty are working on. So we’re hopeful that maybe in the next couple years this Research Day might encourage more collaboration across the college.”

Students from the Department of Physical Therapy discuss their work during Research Day on April 26.

Students from the Department of Physical Therapy discuss their work during Research Day on April 26.

Peter Eischens, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Addictions & Rehabilitation Studies, won the best oral presentation award with his presentation “Developing queer competency in rehabilitation addictions, and clinical counseling graduate programs.”

Other winners chosen by the committee include Patrick Briley and Kori Engler from the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, as well as Morgan Haskins, the team of Jeffrey Harrington and Kate Foy, and Eric Kosco from the Department of Physical Therapy.

People’s Choice award winners were Eshan Pua of CSDI and Cynthia Edsall and Alyssa Kerls from the Department of Clinical Laboratory Science. Winners each received a $100 Amazon gift card.

The college plans to make its Research Day an annual event.

 

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communication

Pirates team up with Vs. Cancer Foundation

ECU's Pirates Vs. Cancer Volunteers. (Photos by Dean Shore)

ECU’s Pirates Vs. Cancer volunteers (Photos by Dean Shore)

On May 8, ECU partnered with the Vs. Cancer Foundation to raise money for the fight against childhood cancer. Pirates Vs. Cancer encouraged students, faculty and staff to raise money and awareness to help children who are battling cancer in eastern North Carolina and throughout the country.

During the Pirates Vs. Cancer event at ECU’s Lake Laupus, fourteen men shaved their heads, five women donated at least eight inches of their hair to be made into wigs and at least ten others volunteered.

Trevor Hunt, ECU Brody School of Medicine M.D. Candidate.

Trevor Hunt, ECU Brody School of Medicine M.D. Candidate.

“We want to help kids who are battling deadly cancers right here in our community while also fighting to beat cancer on a national scale through research in treatments and cures,” said Trevor Hunt, first-year medical student at ECU and event organizer. “Many kids battling cancer lose their hair involuntarily, but the rest of us have a choice. We are choosing to go bald to stand beside them in this fight.”

Originally the group had hoped to raise $5,000 to be split evenly between the James and Connie Maynard Children’s Hospital at Vidant and the national pediatric oncology research effort. As of May 15, they had exceeded their expectations and raised $7,185 with an updated goal of $7,500!

To learn more about Pirates Vs. Cancer or to donate to this amazing cause, click here.

 

 

College of Engineering and Technology Graduates First Environmental Engineering Students

Last week’s College of Engineering and Technology graduation ceremonies saw a couple of momentous occasions. First, the College’s Department of Engineering graduated its 500th student! Secondly, three students were the first to graduate with a concentration in environmental engineering.

Matthew Edwards, Brian Garrett and Troy Puryear came to the program two years ago and then this past Friday, they became a part of college history.

However, the impetus for this program started when the College wanted to add another engineering concentration almost five years ago. The goal was to create opportunities that would complement the needs of eastern North Carolina.

Pictured, from left to right: Instructor Jeff Foeller, Troy Puryear, Matthew Edwards and Asst. Professor Randall Etheridge, Ph.D. Puryear and Edwards are two of the first three graduates to receive an engineering degree with a concentration in environmental engineering. (contributed photo)

Pictured, from left to right: Instructor Jeff Foeller, Troy Puryear, Matthew Edwards and Asst. Professor Randall Etheridge, Ph.D. Puryear and Edwards are two of the first three graduates to receive an engineering degree with a concentration in environmental engineering. (contributed photo)

“We sat down internally and asked what’s going to make a good environmental engineer for this area,” said Jeff Foeller, an Instructor with College and one of the architects of the original curriculum. “We have a lot of water and lot of coastline. Therefore, we knew the program should have a water concentration.”

So, the department mapped out the classes, got the curriculum approved and classes were then made available.

Puryear, who is from Greenville, says this concentration appealed to him because he, “wanted the opportunity to work hands-on, in the field; rather than always indoors or in an office.” Puryear is currently an intern at a local firm and has hopes to continue with that firm as a full-time employee.

Along with the intimacy of the program, Edwards chose the environmental concentration because, “my uncle is an environmental engineer, and I’m able to work both outside and inside.” Edwards has accepted a position with an engineering firm in Raleigh.

Though only three graduated in this first group, Foeller expects to double that number over the next year. The goal is to sustain a program that can handle one or two dozen students a year.

“As we’re growing in the East and developing more land, the need for environmental engineers will increase,” said Foeller.

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communication

Five ECU Students Receive Scholarships from TiMOTION

Thanks to a company that “believes strongly in moving toward a better future,” five engineering students from the College of Engineering and Technology are each the recipient of a $1,000 scholarship.

Pictured, from left to right: Patricia Malcolm, Basel Abdelfattah and Laith Damreh. All three are biomedical engineering students who each received a scholarship from TiMOTION. (contributed photos)

Pictured, from left to right: Patricia Malcolm, Basel Abdelfattah and Laith Damreh. All three are biomedical engineering students who each received a scholarship from TiMOTION. (contributed photos)

In a recent news release, Taiwan’s TiMOTION and its North American Subsidiary awarded these scholarships, which will benefit full-time students of high academic standing who are enrolled in engineering programs. The company considers these awards an investment in the engineers of tomorrow.

Scholarship recipients include:

  • Basel Abdelfattah
  • Laith Damreh
  • Travis Harrison
  • Jamie LoScalzo
  • Patricia Malcolm

All five students are from North Carolina

Junior Jamie LoScalzo is a recipient of a $1,000 scholarship from TiMOTION.

Junior Jamie LoScalzo is a recipient of a $1,000 scholarship from TiMOTION.

Junior Jamie LoScalzo is from New Bern, and she’s currently president of the Dean’s Student Leadership Advisory Council for the College of Engineering and Technology. About the scholarship, she said, “this award helps to alleviate my financial concerns for next semester, and will allow me to focus on my coursework, as well as my extracurricular activities within the college.”

Laith Damreh, a junior from Raleigh, echoed LoScalzo. “This opportunity is very helpful because, with the scholarship, I can work less so I can focus more on my academics.”

Goldsboro’s Malcolm knew from an early age that paying for her education would fall squarely on her shoulders. “My parents told me from a very early age that they would not pay for my college education and that I would be responsible for it myself,” she said. “Getting this scholarship will allow me to continue pursuing my education goals.”

Abdelfattah is from Greenville. Like the other ECU scholarship recipients, this scholarship will have an impact. “It’s motivation for me to work diligently for academic success,” said Abdelfattah. “The scholarship will help lessen the impact of my tuition costs.”

As part of this funding, TiMOTION said it will provide “products for classroom learning and projects.”

TiMOTION is an industry-leading provider of electric linear actuators worldwide.

ECU junior selected for prestigious leadership program

East Carolina University junior Erick Jenkins is one of five students from across the country selected to participate in a prestigious leadership program this fall.

Jenkins received a partial scholarship for the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute’s Leadership and the American Presidency program dedicated to developing the next generation of citizen leaders.

The program is made possible in partnership with Campus Compact to provide scholarships to Newman Civic Fellows like Jenkins for their commitment to finding solutions for challenges facing communities throughout the country.

Campus Compact, of which ECU is a member, is a national coalition of more than 1,000 colleges and universities that promotes community service and civic engagement in higher education.

ECU Chancellor Cecil Staton submitted the nomination for Jenkins to be a 2017 Campus Compact Newman Civic Fellow.

Erick Jenkins, junior at East Carolina University. (contributed photo)

Erick Jenkins, junior at East Carolina University. (contributed photo)

“He is a student leader interested in leadership, activism and democratic engagement,” said Staton. “Erick has committed himself to putting many of ECU’s most treasured values — public service, leadership and community engagement — into action. His participation as a Newman Civic Fellow will continue ECU’s strong tradition of Campus Compact involvement and reflect ECU’s commitment to educating students to be engaged, thoughtful and active citizens.”

From August through May 2018, Jenkins will examine the leadership journeys of presidents in relation to his own life as well as hear from leaders in business, government and the nonprofit sector while completing coursework and an internship in Washington, D.C. He will have access to a variety of virtual and in-person learning opportunities including a national Newman Civic Fellows conference.

“The Newman Civic Fellows program and Reagan institute are a perfect fit for Erick Jenkins,” said Dr. Dennis McCunney, director of ECU’s Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement.  “He has amazing civic leadership skills, and he is passionate about citizenship, voting rights and advocating for people whose voices often go unheard. I’m excited about this opportunity for him; he puts ECU’s mission into action so well.”

Jenkins is majoring in communication. He is from Wilson, North Carolina.

The Leadership and the American Presidency program is co-sponsored by The Fund for American Studies.

For more information, contact McCunney at 252-328-2802.

 

 

-by Crystal Baity 

Brody student organization receives regional chapter award

East Carolina University’s Brody School of Medicine group that supports minority medical students and underserved communities has received a regional award.

The Brody Student National Medical Association chapter was recognized for the extensive community service its members performed this past year, outshining peer groups from North Carolina to Florida and the Caribbean.

“What I love about the Student National Medical Association is that the mission really aligns with the mission of the Brody School of Medicine,” explained chapter president Ebone Evans, a rising third-year medical student from Durham. “SNMA encourages physicians to go to these populations that are traditionally underserved and encourages support and mentorship for medical students who might not have had support in their lives around them.”

From left, Brody SNMA president Ebone Evans with members Jackie Watson and Consola Esambe Lobwede during Hurricane Matthew relief efforts. (contributed photo)

From left, Brody SNMA president Ebone Evans with members Jackie Watson and Consola Esambe Lobwede during Hurricane Matthew relief efforts. (contributed photo)

Many of the group’s community initiatives this past academic year involved members serving as role models for area youth.

For Project ALPHA, members provided weekly health education training to young men at Dobbs Community Juvenile Detention Center in Kinston. Weekly workshops at Building Hope Community Life Center in Greenville helped young ladies transition to womanhood. Programming included a seminar on making healthy snacks and another from ECU dental medicine students on proper dental hygiene.

Other community service efforts included a reading buddies program at the Little Willie Center in Greenville and a pre-medical conference to encourage undergraduate minority students interested in pursuing medicine. Members also took an active role in Hurricane Matthew relief efforts in the fall.

“Just as much as the people in these programs get from us, we get so much from them,” Evans said. “We get so much understanding of life — a better understanding of the community — and that’s how you really are able to affect the population that you’re serving, if you understand who they are.”

Any medical student can join the chapter, Evans said, but minority students typically comprise membership. The group’s leaders are working to continue increasing community service and encourage diversity among members.

“We want people to know this isn’t an organization just for minority students,” she said. “It’s an organization that would like to train the majority population to know how to support minority populations as they go through their medical training.”

Dr. Cassandra Bradby, the group’s adviser and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine, applauded Brody’s SNMA members for their efforts to help promote and exemplify diversity in medicine.

“Given all of the rigors of medical school, it is very hard to be able to balance all of these service projects and programs, as well as excel in school and our students have managed to do both,” she said. “I am so proud and excited that they have earned this award. No chapter deserves it more.”

 

 

by Elizabeth Willy, University Communication

The Inaugural James H. Bearden Induction Ceremony Welcomes 66 Students to Beta Gamma Sigma

The inaugural James H. Bearden Induction Ceremony was recently held for new members of the ECU College of Business Chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma.

Dr. James H. Bearden. (contributed photos)

Dr. James H. Bearden. (contributed photos)

Dr. James H. Bearden, College of Business Dean Stan Eakins, college faculty and family members celebrated the induction of 66 students and one faculty member into the chapter, which is the honor society serving business programs accredited by AACSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

Donors gave more than $100,000 to the newly created James. H Bearden Endowment Fund, which provided support for this induction ceremony and will help fund future induction ceremonies that will also bear Bearden’s name.

“In honor of Jim’s passion and interest in promoting academic excellence, the new fund will support the efforts of Beta Gamma Sigma,” said Eakins.

The endowment was set up to recognize Bearden’s 56-year career at ECU. He served as the College of Business’ second dean from 1968 to 1983, established the college’s MBA degree and was instrumental in the accreditation of the college’s graduate program.

Bearden also established the Beta Gamma Sigma chapter at ECU and later became that society’s national president.

The spring 2017 Beta Gamma Sigma induction recognized the following:

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, sophomores Agarwal, Ashworth, Bishop, Butz, Drahus, Ervin, Forbes, Georgi, Krause, Kruesi, Ozzimo, Saffer, Potter, Powell, Saffer, Sebastian and Dean Eakins.

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, sophomores Agarwal, Ashworth, Bishop, Butz, Drahus, Ervin, Forbes, Georgi, Krause, Kruesi, Ozzimo, Saffer, Potter, Powell, Saffer, Sebastian and Dean Eakins.

Sophomores
Sumeet Agarwal
Catherine Anne Ashworth
Victoria Bishop
Meredith Butz
Anela Cizmic
Madelyn Craig
Nicholas John Drahus
Malia Elle Ervin
Adam Stephen Forbes
Ronny Georgi
Oakleigh Hogg
Zachary Aaron Kelly
Allison King
Logan Sikes Krause
Dylan Thomas Kruesi
Xin Yin Lin
Shannon Ozzimo
Stavan Patel
Anderson Lee Potter
Hoskins Henry Powell
Kayla Elizabeth Saffer
Ana Sebastian
Gerrit R. Van Staalduinen

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, juniors Cherry, Kube, Micham, Nobles, Roberts, Sherrod, Skorupa, Small, Spain, Strickland, Wood and Dean Eakins.

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, juniors Cherry, Kube, Micham, Nobles, Roberts, Sherrod, Skorupa, Small, Spain, Strickland, Wood and Dean Eakins.

Juniors
Davis Wiley Baker
Emily Rebecca Bowman
Brigid Margaret Burke
Sarah Pearl Cherry
Justin Thomas Delise
Garrett William Hinton
Angus Edward Johnson
Molly Anne Kube
Kate Law
Shelby Nicole Micham
Amber Halle Nobles
Clayton Olson
Faith Roberts
Mary P Sherrod
Lesia Elisabeth Skorupa
Tyler Brian Small
Hudson Spain
Lydia Gayle Strickland
Anthony Vallone
Madisyn Van Ham
Connor Michael Wilson
Sarah Katharine Wood

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, seniors Thirakounh, Paylor, Maye, Correa and Dean Eakins

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, seniors Thirakounh, Paylor, Maye, Correa and Dean Eakins

Seniors
Jessica R Bell
Amber G. Brown
David Michael DeLaney
Diana Maria Garcia Correa
Terry Matias
Stephen Michael Maye
Crystal Irene Merrill
David Hendrick Paylor
Lazaro J. Perez
Hassell Gray Proctor
Tara Elizabeth Royster
Victor Somphet Thirakounh
Emily Anne Tini
Thomas Tyler
Charles Thomas Yorgen

 

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, Nancy Ray, graduate London Paulson and Dean Eakins

Pictured, from left to right: Dr. Bearden, Nancy Ray, graduate London Paulson and Dean Eakins

Graduates
Jody C Bennett
Paula Suzanne Fisher
London Steele Paulson
Rajeshwar Rajeshwar
Demetrius L. Walker
Shannon Marie Wrigley

Faculty
Nancy Ray

Beta Gamma Sigma membership is the highest recognition a business student can achieve. Two times a year, the College of Business inducts eligible students and faculty into Beta Gamma Sigma. Membership is by invitation only and is based upon eligibility criteria, including those who rank in the top 10 percent of the second-semester sophomore, junior and senior classes, as well as the top 20 percent of graduating graduate students. Before nomination, the entire faculty of the College of Business reviews each candidate to ensure he or she meets the standards of character and integrity that membership represents.

Tina Williams, college faculty, currently serves as the advisor and president of ECU’s Beta Gamma Sigma chapter.

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communication

Mathematical sculpture workshop spotlights the math behind art

Applied mathematician and sculptor Dr. George Hart led an April 7 workshop in Jenkins Fine Arts Center at East Carolina University which spotlighted the math behind art.

Hart, an interdepartmental research professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, demonstrated how mathematics is creative in unexpected ways.

Dr. George Hart is an applied mathematician and sculptor. (photos by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. George Hart is an applied mathematician and sculptor. (photos by Cliff Hollis)

Twenty-seven students, faculty and staff from across campus as well as teachers from the greater Greenville community assembled two of Hart’s sculptures and designed two of their own.

The event was organized by Dr. Sviatoslav Archava, teaching associate professor of mathematics at ECU.

Workshop participants started by connecting plastic struts and connector balls from a Zometool kit, forming shapes that would prove to be foundational for the sculptures that they would create.

The sculpture “Autumn.” (photos by Cliff Hollis)

The sculpture “Autumn.”
(photos by Cliff Hollis)

The first sculpture, named “Autumn”, was assembled from 60 identical laser-cut wood pieces that were connected using cable ties. Working together, the participants explored the possible ways to connect the pieces, a task that developed spatial perception and visual reasoning. The solution for the sculpture involved two phases. The first phase was a finding a solution to connect three pieces. After that, it was possible to build the sculpture by combining the trio of connected pieces to other trios. Only one way to connect the pieces led to a beautiful structure they were trying to assemble. The following facts about the sculpture were noted by the participants with Hart’s help:

  • “Autumn” may be viewed as an artistic version of a regular dodecahedron, a solid that is formed by 12 regular pentagons.
  • Sixty pieces from which the sculpture is built lie in 30 planes (two in each plane). The 30 planes are the facial planes of the five cubes inscribed in the dodecahedron or, equivalently, of the rhombic tricontahedron.

 

The "Ambagesque" sculpture.

The “Ambagesque” sculpture.

The second sculpture, named “Ambagesque” (from the Latin word for “tangle”), also had 60 pieces, which were laser-cut from colored acrylic sheets. The pieces lie in 20 different planes (three in each plane). Despite the smaller number of planes involved, it was much more difficult to assemble due to the non- edge-to-edge connections and more complicated geometry. On a few occasions, participants needed Hart’s help to find the correct way to proceed.

Assembling the sculptures gave the participants a sense of the mental processes that mathematicians use in their research and the excitement and pleasure of “figuring things out.”

At the end of the workshop, participants designed their own paper sculpture. This involved changing the faces of the rhombic tricontahedron so the altered faces could be glued back together to create a visually appealing form.

Participants went away with an idea of the underlying shapes, the curiosity to look for patterns in complex-looking sculptures they may see elsewhere or design themselves, and having experienced the thrill of exploring the world around them mathematically.

For more information on Hart and his work, visit http://georgehart.com/.

 

 

-by Dr. Slava Archava, Teaching Associate Professor of Mathematics

 

Annual High School STEM Day Brings 300 Students to ECU

Nearly 300 high school juniors from across eastern North Carolina recently visited East Carolina University (ECU) to experience and learn more about Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) opportunities offered at the University. ECU’s College of Engineering and Technology, the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Education, including the STEM Center for Education, sponsored the event and provided more than 60 volunteers.

Students rotated through three of 15 hands-on, engaging sessions that were taught by current ECU faculty and students. Departments represented included engineering, physics, technology, mathematics, chemistry, biology, construction management, computer science, geology, geography, atmospheric science, math and science education.

Some of the hands-on learning sessions included:

  • Learning about and how to extract DNA
  • Determining the types of clays that might be addressed on a construction site
  • Exploring how high-resolution 3D models are captured using a simulation of unmanned aircraft systems, and how to analyze and visualize environmental change
  • Using cryptography to send secure messages and how it is used in the military for confidential communication and secure online banking, shopping and other applications
Area high school juniors recently visited ECU for the sixth annual High School Stem Day. Fifteen hands-on sessions were scheduled that represented a wide variety of education opportunities available at the University. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Area high school juniors recently visited ECU for the sixth annual High School Stem Day. Fifteen hands-on sessions were scheduled that represented a wide variety of education opportunities available at the University. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

This annual event was the second STEM-related event held at ECU in as many weeks. Earlier, more than 140 area Girl Scouts participated in TechnoQuest, which also was designed to introduce STEM to the participants.

Margaret Turner, director of marketing and outreach for ECU’s College of Engineering and Technology, helped organize both events and also helped organize the five former high school STEM Days. Over the years, she’s noticed a very obvious increase in students interested in STEM. Not only does STEM Day introduce these students to exciting and interesting careers, Turner enjoys introducing these students to a university that can help them capture their future, STEM-related degrees.

“I see the excitement in the students faces every time they step on campus and into the sessions,” said Turner. “I’m fortunate to have the opportunity to let them know that if they do pursue a STEM-related career, ECU is a great choice to get them started.

Students Managing Students

Helping Turner organize this year’s event were three college students pursuing their own STEM-related degrees in engineering. Juniors Jessica Campos, Meagan Smith, and Malik Simon provided Turner with project management support. As part of a class assignment in an engineering project management course, they helped Turner with everything from volunteer training, the session schedule, transportation and communication.

“STEM day was an effective way to show how much detail goes into planning an event,” said Smith. “There were months of meetings that involved brainstorming on how to improve the planning process and ways to improve how the day would flow.”

Part of that brainstorming saw the introduction of social media to help with communication between all volunteers. The application that was used is called GroupMe.

Juniors Meagan Smith (left), Jessica Campos (right) and Malik Simon (not pictured) provided project management support for High School STEM Day. This marked the first time students played a role in managing the event.

Juniors Meagan Smith (left), Jessica Campos (right) and Malik Simon (not pictured) provided project management support for High School STEM Day. This marked the first time students played a role in managing the event.

“We had volunteers outside Wright circle waiting for high schools to drop off their students, and with this app, our volunteers were able to tell us what schools were here, where to meet them, the final number of students they brought and more,” said Campos. “Throughout the day we were able to communicate any issues that arose using GroupMe, and with everyone’s input, we were able to resolve those issues.”

“Throughout the day we were able to communicate any issues that arose using GroupMe, and with everyone’s input, we were able to resolve those issues.”

“Jessica, Meagan and Malik did a wonderful job in helping make sure we had another successful STEM day,” added Turner. “I think they learned a great deal about the many logistics involved in organizing such a large event. They were also proud to see the event happen and go smoothly and realize they had a large part in planning it.”

This was the first time college students helped with managing the event.

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communication 

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