In Memoriam – James Davenport

A familiar face around campus, James Davenport is shown at right during a reception for fellow ECU employee Nellie Taylor. (Contributed photo)

A familiar face around campus, James Davenport is shown at right during a reception for fellow ECU employee Nellie Taylor. (Contributed photo)

James Davenport from the East Carolina University Department of Materials Management died Jan. 21 after a lengthy illness.

He had worked with ECU for 25 years. Many faculty and staff came to know Davenport as the person who delivered office supplies for Central Stores and Receiving.

He also worked with Event One at athletic events and concerts at ECU venues for a number of years. He was also an avid Pirate fan.

Nutrition students develop their professional leadership styles

Students detail their  analyses of Pitt County areas to Sandra Spann (left), president of Food Systems Consultants. Spann was one of the experts who spoke with the class during their project designed to enhance leadership skills. (Contributed photo)

Students detail their analyses of Pitt County areas to Sandra Spann (left), president of Food Systems Consultants. Spann was one of the experts who spoke with the class during their project designed to enhance leadership skills. (Contributed photos)

By Nicole Wood
College of Human Ecology

East Carolina University nutrition science professor Brenda Bertrand engaged 35 students last semester in a project designed to enhance their leadership skills.

Bertrand

Bertrand

The students teamed up to conduct “windshield tours” of Pitt County, using photography to document their research. The students examined health issues including whether areas were equipped for walkers or bikers and whether grocery stores or convenience stores were in close proximity to neighborhoods and schools.

Students then considered the implications of their findings and what those results would mean for the studied locations, which included Farmville, Chicod, Grimesland, Ayden and Stokes. They developed diagrams to chart the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) in those areas.

When the teams shared their diagrams with the entire class, a trend emerged. “They began to notice similarities between the different communities,” said Elizabeth Kroeger, graduate assistant for the course. “They each saw limited access to fresh fruits and vegetables with community and geographical constraints for shopping (distance or lack of grocery stores) and transportation (lack of sidewalks).” The teams then collaborated to combine their findings into an SWOT diagram for all of Pitt County.

Representatives from the studied communities visited the class to help students develop new ideas and intervention plans that are feasible for real-world application. Nutrition experts worked with the students throughout the process and visited campus to share their perspectives on the students’ plans.

Graduate student Elizabeth Kroeger, left, is gathering data from the nutrition students' project as part of her own research project. Kroeger is pictured with one of the students at the Pitt County Boy’s and Girl’s Clubs, where she also works.

Graduate student Elizabeth Kroeger, left, is gathering data from the nutrition students’ project as part of her own research project. Kroeger is pictured with one of the students at the Pitt County Boy’s and Girl’s Clubs, where she also works.

The students created a blog detailing their project and their own understanding of leadership in rural health. Along the way, students read articles regarding transformative leadership – a type of leadership that has ideal traits for working within the nutrition field. They answered questions about the articles on their blogs. Students also took questionnaires that identified their leadership traits at the beginning and end of the project.

While the students gathered data on the communities, Kroeger gathered details on the students’ learning process and leadership transformation. She will use the data for a graduate research project to determine whether the students’ leadership styles changed throughout the project.

“The qualitative research we collected of the students’ perspectives on the leadership projects (and) leadership in general will be used to prepare a manuscript for a journal submission in 2014,” said Kroeger. “Hopefully, our research will give professors in the field of nutrition insight into how to effectively develop leadership skills among their students.”

The project was sponsored in part by a BB&T Leadership Grant. Those grants aim to advance ECU’s culture of service and its place as a leadership development community by encouraging and assisting units across campus to embed leadership development components into their courses and programs.

 

 

Civil rights activist to speak at ECU

Civil Rights activist Julian Bond will return to East Carolina University this month to deliver the Lawrence F. Brewster Lecture in History as part of the 2013-14 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series. As pictured above, Bond also appeared at ECU in September 1970. (Photo courtesy of ECU Archives)

Civil Rights activist Julian Bond will return to East Carolina University this month to deliver the Lawrence F. Brewster Lecture in History as part of the 2013-14 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series. As pictured above, seated at left, Bond also appeared at ECU in September 1970. (Photo courtesy of ECU Archives)

Julian Bond, civil rights activist and professor emeritus of the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia, will deliver the Lawrence F. Brewster Lecture in History at East Carolina University.

Julian Bond

Julian Bond

Bond will discuss “Civil Rights, Then and Now,” at 7 p.m. Jan. 28 in ECU’s Wright Auditorium. The presentation is part of the 2013-14 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series. A question and answer session will immediately follow the presentation.

Bond is distinguished professor in residence in the Department of Government at the American University in Washington, D.C., He is also known as an activist in the civil rights, economic justice and peace movements. In 1960, he helped organize the Atlanta University Center Committee on Appeal for Human Rights, which directed several years of non-violent protests, and by 1962, won integration of Atlanta’s movie theaters, lunch counters and parks.

He served for two decades in the Georgia House and Georgia Senate, drafting more than 60 bills that became law. In 1968, Bond became the first African American to be nominated for the vice presidency of the United States.

He has received the American Civil Liberties Union Bill of Rights Awards from Massachusetts and Georgia, and was named one of America’s Top 200 Leaders by Time magazine. He holds 25 honorary degrees.

Dr. John A. Tucker, director of the Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series, said that Bond’s lecture honors Greenville physicians Dr. Andrew Best, Dr. Fred Irons, Dr. Malene Irons, Dr. Ray Minges and Dr. Earl Trevathan for their contributions to the social health of ECU and the Greenville community. “These physicians led the movement to desegregate Pitt County Memorial Hospital, now Vidant, in the early 1960s,” Tucker said.

To make a contribution to the series, or for additional information, contact Tucker at 252-328-1028, or via email at tuckerjo@ecu.edu. Additional information is also available at http://www.ecu.edu/voyages.

bond1

ECU sonographer receives national award

Diana McCormick Strickland, a sonographer at East Carolina University, has received the

Strickland

Strickland

2014 Distinguished Sonographer Award from the American Institute of Ultrasound Medicine.

She is a registered diagnostic cardiac sonographer and a registered diagnostic medical sonographer. She works in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Brody School of Medicine, where she is a clinical assistant professor and co-director of ultrasound in the division of maternal-fetal medicine.

Strickland specializes in high-risk obstetric ultrasound and fetal echocardiography.

Strickland has an associate degree from Caldwell Community College, a bachelor’s degree from ECU and a certificate in advanced radiologic technology from Duke University.

Sonographers operate ultrasonic imaging devices to produce diagnostic images, scans, videos or 3-D volumes of data.

The award will be presented at the 2104 AIUM annual convention March 29-April 2 in Las Vegas.

Grad Expo set for early February

Dowdy Student Store will host a Grad Expo for May 2014 graduates from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Feb. 4 and 5 and from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Feb. 6 at the student store in the Wright Building on campus.

Graduating seniors can pick up caps and gowns; register for graduation; and order class rings, custom invitations, announcements and thank-you notes. Jostens, the official provider of class rings for ECU, will have samples of class rings, and representatives can help with finger sizing and original designs.

The Pirate Club, Alumni Association, Career Center, Campus Recreation and College of  Education Office of Alternative Licensure will be on hand with offers and information. Jostens has donated three $100 gas cards that will be given away in a drawing. All May 2014 graduates are invited to enter; no purchase is necessary.

Graduating seniors unable to attend the Expo can visit Dowdy Student Stores after Feb. 6 to pick up their caps and gowns.

For more information about the Expo, call 252-328-6731 or visit www.studentstores.ecu.edu.

Open House set for Family Therapy Clinic, Redditt House

An open house for the ECU Family Therapy Clinic and Redditt House: Medical Family Therapy Research Academy will be held from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Jan. 24. Visitors may meet faculty and student interns and tour the facilities at 612 E. 10th St. in Greenville.

ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard will present the Excellence in Collaboration Award to the Seymour Johnson Air Force Base – 4 th Medical Group, which has served as a critical collaborator for the Operation Re-Entry of North Carolina Research initiatives.

The ECU Family Therapy Clinic has been a resource for families in the community for more than 20 years with an average of 2,500 people coming through the clinic’s doors each year. Clinic services include individual therapy from a systemic perspective, couple therapy, family therapy and premarital services.

The Clinic also specializes in medical family therapy to assist the entire family when one member of the family is critically or chronically ill. Employee assistance programs for small business are also available.

The ECU Family Therapy Clinic and the Redditt House: Medical Family Therapy Research Academy are part of the Department of Child Development and Family Relations in the College of Human Ecology at East Carolina University. Visit www.ecu.edu/che/cdfr for additional information or contact Dr. Lisa Tyndall at tyndalll@ecu.edu, 252-328-4206.

ECU honors Martin Luther King Jr. through service, speaker

During a previous year's MLK Jr. Day of Service event, ECU College of Business graduate assistants Heather Clayton and Devang Patel worked together to paint a wall in the Salvation Army's Family Store. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

During a previous year’s MLK Jr. Day of Service event, ECU College of Business graduate assistants Heather Clayton and Devang Patel worked together to paint a wall in the Salvation Army’s Family Store. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

East Carolina University students were encouraged to use their day off from classes on Monday, Jan. 20 to participate in a day of service honoring Martin Luther King Jr.

The day’s activities were organized by the Volunteer and Service-Learning Center and other campus groups, which scheduled 10 sites where students could volunteer including the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina, Third Street Community Center, Jarvis Boys and Girls Club, My Sister’s Closet, all in Greenville and A Time for Science in Grifton.

The day began at 8:30 a.m. in Hendrix Theatre, where volunteers met for a light breakfast, watched a video clip of King’s “I have a dream” speech, heard from community leaders about the importance of service and community engagement and participated in team-building exercises.

The students then traveled to their assigned locations.

Also involved in The MLK Day of Service are the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center, Alpha Phi Alpha, the Black Student Union and the Council on Family Relations.

Several other commemorative events were planned for campus, including:

  • 17th Annual Community Unity Breakfast, Monday, 7:30 – 9 a.m., the Murphy Center at ECU. This was a free event, hosted by the Greenville-Pitt County Chamber of Commerce and the Office of the Mayor, City of Greenville.  Dr. Virginia Hardy, ECU vice chancellor for student affairs, was the featured speaker. The ECU Gospel Choir performed.
  • Humanitarian, actor, author, health and wellness ambassador/educator and philanthropist, Hill Harper spoke on “Visualizing the Dream” to the ECU community, Tuesday, 7 p.m., Wright Auditorium. Free admission, but tickets are required. For ticket information, call 252-328-2466.
  • Dr. Allen Mask will be the keynote speaker at the 30th annual Andrew A. Best M.D. Senior Recognition Banquet on Saturday, Jan. 25, for graduating minority medical students at ECU. Mask is the founder and director of Raleigh Urgent Care and the WRAL-TV health team physician. The event begins at 7 p.m. at the East Carolina Heart Institute at East Carolina University at 115 Heart Drive. The event was sponsored by the ECU Student National Medical Association. Best was Greenville’s first black physician. He died in 2005. Information is available by calling 252-744-2278 or e-mailing aabestbanquet2014@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

Pirates jump into new year with Polar Bear Plunge, Highlight the Night dance

plunge1

East Carolina University’s Division of Student Affairs is hosting two events to help students kick off the spring semester.

The 18th annual Polar Bear Plunge is set for 7 p.m. Jan. 23 at the Student Recreation Center outdoor pool.  Registration begins at 6:30 p.m. with an ECU One Card required. All ECU students, faculty and staff are invited to jump into the icy waters of the outdoor pool. ECU Women’s Basketball Coach Heather Macy will kick-start the event as the ceremonial first jumper.

The first 1,100 jumpers will receive a free event T-shirt. Jumpers should bring a towel and fill out a waiver prior to jumping. The waiver can be completed on-site or downloaded at www.ecu.edu/polarbear.

The Polar Bear Plunge started at ECU in 1997 as part of the grand opening of the Student Recreation Center and 35 participants took the plunge. The event has grown annually, breaking records each year since 2010. Last year, 1,094 jumpers participated.

During the event, participants may enjoy refreshments and attend the Get-A-Clue Involvement Fair, which provides information on programs and activities with organizations on campus. Get-A-Clue begins at 6:30 p.m. and is also held at the Student Recreation Center. Campus Recreation & Wellness, Campus Living & Dining, Coca-Cola, and Student Involvement and Leadership sponsor the Polar Bear Plunge and Get-A-Clue.

On Jan. 24 from 10 p.m. – 2 a.m. is the second annual Highlight the Night dance at ECU’s Student Recreation Center.  The dance will feature DJ K-Ro and DJ Thomas, both ECU students.  The Student Activities Board welcomed more than 1,200 students to the inaugural event last year.

Tickets to the dance are free to ECU students with their One Card. Guests accompanied by an ECU student can attend for $15.

 

ECU students speak to UNC Board of Governors

ECU junior Kaitlyn  Dutton, left and SGA President Tim Schwan, right, pose with UNC Board of Governors member Fred Eschelman. (Contributed photo)

ECU junior Kaitlyn Dutton, left, and SGA President Tim Schwan, right, pose with UNC Board of Governors member Fred Eschelman, center. (Contributed photo)

By Chris Stansbury
For ECU News Services

East Carolina University is another step closer to approval of the new student centers and parking deck project.  The UNC Board of Governors Budget and Finance committee met Jan. 9 in the Spangler Building in Chapel Hill to discuss the financial plan for the project.

The project calls for two new student centers – one to be built on the main campus and another on the health sciences campus. In addition, a parking deck is planned to connect with the main campus student center.

SGA President Tim Schwan and ECU junior Kaitlyn Dutton were joined by Brig. Gen. James Gorham to show their support for the project as well as answer questions from board members.

Gorham, an ECU alumnus who also has a daughter attending ECU, told board members that this project is a lot like being a parent.

“When you first get married you oftentimes build a starter home to start your family,” said Gorham, vice president of the ECU Parents Council.  “But as your family grows, you have to provide a quality dwelling for your expanding family to grow and have a better quality of life. ECU’s campus has grown considerably in the last 40 years and the students need a quality place for them to grow.”

Schwan and Dutton told the board members about the difficulty students face on ECU’s campus with Mendenhall Student Center, the current student union built in the 1970s.

“To say there is a lack of space for students in Mendenhall is an understatement,” Schwan said. “We need a place that serves as a living room, a place to meet and collaborate. We don’t have that now.”

Dutton added that a lack of a new student center is actually costing students more money.

“Some students face a yearlong wait to secure space in Mendenhall and for other major student events that are annual traditions, we have to host them off campus,” said Dutton. “That requires extra funds for reservations, transportation and off-site logistics and the cost is falling on the students to pay for it.”

Dr. Virginia Hardy, vice chancellor for Student Affairs, who attended the board session along with members of the ECU Board of Trustees, said this was a great experience for the students.

“Kaitlyn and Tim did a wonderful job of representing the East Carolina student body of today and tomorrow,” said Hardy. “They spoke from their heart trying to convince the Board of Governors to invest in ECU’s future and the success of our future students.”

The next step in the process for ECU’s student centers and parking deck project is the vote by the UNC Board of Governors on Feb. 20 in Chapel Hill.

For more information, contact Dr. Virginia Hardy at 252-328-6541.

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