Lessons from the Past

Dr. Bill Jenkins speaks Feb. 4 during the seventh annual Jean Mills Health Symposium at ECU. More than 150 participants attended the event, which focuses on addressing health disparities in the region. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Past lessons important to the future of community health, expert says

A small group of people can make a difference in fostering better health in a community and often have the most success in creating change, said Dr. William “Bill” Jenkins, keynote speaker for the Jean Mills Health Symposium held Feb. 4.

Jenkins, adjunct associate professor of epidemiology at Morehouse School of Medicine and senior fellow with the Institute for African American Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, spoke about the myths and realities of community participatory research.

It begins at the grassroots level, with the endorsement and support of those living in the community. That means practicing cultural humility and not assuming you know what’s best for a community, he said.

Jenkins served two decades as supervisory epidemiologist in the National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and managed its Minority Health Activities Program. He managed the Participant Health Benefits Program, which assures medical services to the survivors of the Tuskegee syphilis study. Jenkins also served as an expert on minority issues in disease transmission as chief of the research and evaluation statistics section in the Division of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention and as manager of the National Minority Organizations HIV Prevention Program.
His role in caring for the survivors of the Tuskegee syphilis study gave him a great appreciation for and understanding of best practices for community research.

The study, which ended in 1972, followed 600 men with syphilis for 40 years. Medical students, nurses and CDC physicians took samples in the field, collected and recorded data. Wherever the men they went, they were followed to make sure they did not receive treatment so results could be documented. “It was one of the best managed programs in public health history,” Jenkins said.

Many returned from World War I with the disease.

“Syphilis is the great imitator,” Jenkins said, since the disease can mimic heart disease and other ailments. “It’s a fascinating disease as much as most people think HIV is today.”

While the syphilis study eventually was condemned, it was landmark in its methodology. “How you do community research can be taught by this method,” Jenkins said.

As a result, researchers have changed practices that include institutional review boards, voluntary informed consent and federal policy for the protection of human subjects.

The basic tenets of bioethics are do no harm, be fair, allow autonomy and beneficence.

How a community benefits must be kept at the forefront. “Drug companies will pay a lot of money for community participatory research,” Jenkins said. “Just because you’re doing research in a community doesn’t mean you’re doing research for the community.”

In its seventh year, the Jean Mills Health Symposium drew 150 participants and had a waiting list, said Dr. Stephen Thomas, dean of the ECU College of Allied Health Sciences, which sponsors the event in collaboration with the ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation, Pitt Memorial Hospital Foundation and Eastern Area Health Education Center. The event coincides with Black History Month.

Jean Elaine Mills earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1977 and a master’s in public administration with a concentration in community health from ECU in 1984. She died from breast cancer in 2000.
Amos T. Mills III, Jean’s brother, created the symposium in an effort to keep her spirit of discovery and community outreach alive.

“Health care is the most important thing in people’s lives,” Mills said in recognizing professor emeritus Donald Ensley, who spearheaded the creation of the event and taught Jean Mills while she was a student at ECU. “If you don’t have good health, you don’t have a good quality of life.”

Video from the event will be shown on ECU’s Ch. 99 and will be posted on the College of Allied Health Sciences website at www.ecu.edu/ah.

The symposium featured more than 20 recognized experts on the principles of community engagement: mutual benefits, collaborative relationships and empowerment. Presentations focused on the scholarship of engagement and on service to the community with an engagement model addressing health disparities and minority health.

New Concentration

ECU Kicks off New Risk Management and Insurance Program

The College of Business at East Carolina University kicked off its new risk management and insurance program this month. Directed by Brenda Wells, an insurance expert who holds a Ph.D. in risk management and insurance from the University of Georgia, ECU’s risk management and insurance concentration is a direct result of partnerships with industry professionals. More than 40 students have already enrolled.

Protecting Artifacts

On Feb. 19, the 66th anniversary of the landing of the U.S. invasion on Iwo Jima, East Carolina University historians and conservators held a public viewing of a rare rubber topographical map depicting Iwo Jima during WWII. The map illustrated airstrips and roads on the island and was used for training naval intelligence officers. ECU Director of Conservation Susanne Grieve (Maritime Studies) said ECU conservators preserved the map by removing previous restorations that caused the rubber to deteriorate. Grieve, center, is pictured above with maritime studies graduate student Nicole Wittig, left, and Emily Powell, graduate student in history. Following the event, the map was returned to the Battleship North Carolina collection in Wilmington. Other presenters included history professors Michael Palmer on World War II and John Tucker on Japan in World War II; and Joyner Library Special Collections Curator Jonathan Dembo on the Joyner Library World War II special collections. Dembo displayed items from the library’s collections of original letters, action reports and maps showing the landing beaches on Iwo Jima and the Western Pacific theater. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Summer medical education program deadline nears

College students and recent graduates aiming for a career as a physician have until March 4 to apply to ECU’s Summer Program for Future Doctors.

The eight-week summer program at the Brody School of Medicine, which begins May 16, is an intensive program that lets participants experience the demands of a medical school curriculum.

The only requirement is that students be North Carolina residents. Preference is given to minorities, disadvantaged and non-traditional students, but all students are encouraged to apply.

Students should have satisfactorily completed one year of biology, chemistry and physics. Organic chemistry is strongly encouraged. The program is tuition-free, though participants are responsible for living expenses. Eligible students will receive stipends.

Applications and more information are online at http://www.ecu.edu/ascc/SPFD.cfm.

Author Recognition

Registration is open for the 20011 Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards.

The program, hosted annually by Laupus Library, provides Health Sciences faculty and staff recognition for published research and scholarly contributions to an area of study.

All Health Sciences faculty and staff who have been published in books and peer reviewed journals between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011 are eligible to register.

An awards ceremony will be held Nov. 15 at the Greenville Hilton.

For details on eligibility, registration forms and deadlines, visit the Health Sciences Author Recognition web site at www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/HSAR.

Contact Roger Russell at russellr@ecu.edu or (252) 744-3215 for more information.

UNC President Visits

Jeff Davies, left, chief of staff to UNC President Tom Ross, right, walk with ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard during Ross' visit to the campus on Tuesday, Feb. 15. Ross is touring UNC-system campuses during his first months as head of the 16-campus system. During his visit, Ross had question and answer sessions with students, faculty, and senior administrators and toured facilities on both health sciences and main campus. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Past lessons important

Past lessons important to the future of community health, expert says

Dr. Bill Jenkins speaks Feb. 4 during the seventh annual Jean Mills Health Symposium at ECU. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

A small group of people can make a difference in fostering better health in a community and often have the most success in creating change, said Dr. William “Bill” Jenkins, keynote speaker for the Jean Mills Health Symposium held Feb. 4.

Jenkins, adjunct associate professor of epidemiology at Morehouse School of Medicine and senior fellow with the Institute for African American Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, spoke about the myths and realities of community participatory research.

It begins at the grassroots level, with the endorsement and support of those living in the community. That means practicing cultural humility and not assuming you know what’s best for a community, he said.

Read more…

Pass Clinic

PASS Clinic Provides Low Cost Services

East Carolina University has opened a psychological training and clinic facility providing low cost treatments in cognitive behavioral psychotherapy, healthy weight management, smoking cessation and women’s health.

The new ECU Psychological Assessment and Specialty Services Clinic, directed by Tony Cellucci, will treat patients while at the same time training doctoral students under the supervision of licensed psychologists.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a treatment approach that helps patients manage issues with drugs and alcohol as well as dealing with emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression.

Healthy weight services for all ages provide a focus on small lifestyle changes, while addressing thoughts, behaviors and emotional factors related to weight gain. Smoking cessation helps patients reduce or stop the use of tobacco and nicotene. Both the healthy weight services and smoking cessation services are NCFLEX approved.

Women’s health services provide therapy related to stress or mental health issues, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorders, or difficulty with relationships, fertility or chronic pain.

The clinic is in Room 311, Rawl Building on the ECU campus. For additional information about the clinic, contact the clinic office at (252) 737-4180.

Emerging Technology

ECU hospitality management student Erin Carson, left, checks out an Apple iPad from Pam Evans, head of service – circulation for ECU’s Joyner Library, as part of the library’s pilot program that allows patrons to test drive new technology. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Patrons queue up for new technology at Joyner Library

Response was immediate.

East Carolina University faculty, staff and students quickly snatched up 10 Apple iPads offered for checkout in a Jan. 31 e-mail announcement from Joyner Library. All available devices left the building within two hours; 30 people joined a waiting list.

A similar reaction greeted the library’s pre-Christmas offering of the e-readers Kindle and Nook.

The offers were made as part of a Joyner Library pilot program designed to provide both access and opportunity for patrons to test drive emerging technologies. Kindles and Nooks may be checked out for two weeks, while the iPad loan period is three days.

“Providing these devices to our users to gauge their use and acceptance is an important part of our ongoing efforts to meet the changing information access needs of our users,” said Larry Boyer, dean of Academic Library and Learning Resources.

Boyer said that publishing and information delivery industries have undergone drastic changes in the past decade, with even more rapid changes to come. “E-books and e-book readers will be an important part of that story,” he said.

During the 2010 holiday season, e-book downloads outstripped the sale of hardback bestsellers, Boyer said. A Kindle user himself, Boyer gave his wife and two daughters each a Kindle for Christmas. They were a “big, big hit,” he said, “although all of us continue to love and appreciate the printed book.”

While many readers have checked out a Kindle or Nook to investigate them prior to making a purchase, many faculty members are reserving the iPads with specific plans for academic use, said Pam Evans, head of service for Circulation at Joyner Library. “iPad technology has entered the classroom, with professors using the electronic devices for instruction,” she said.

The library has 10 iPads, six Kindles and six Nooks for checkout, and requests for the devices have been so overwhelming that circulation staff are reviewing alternative booking methods just to keep up, Evans said.

Users returning the devices have completed a survey about their experience, submitting comments such as “This gave me the opportunity to explore before buying”; “I used it at a conference. It was small and easy to pack”; and “I liked the iPad so much, I just bought one.”

College of Education professor Beth Fine checked out four iPads to use in a face-to-face course in educational technology as part of a discussion on incorporating emerging technologies to enhance the curriculum and improve teacher productivity.

Many of her students had never used iPads before and were excited to have the opportunity for some hands-on exploration. The library’s program is “an amazing idea,” she said.

“The power of this new technology with teacher education students is something that can be understood only when it is used,” Fine said. “Providing opportunities for new teachers and teachers in training to interact with emerging technologies is a key idea that we, as a university, can focus on in our attempt to provide them with a rich and diverse experience prior to their field experiences.”

Faculty, staff and students may also take a look at the electronic devices during an e-Book/e-Reader Education Exposition March 22, sponsored by Emerging Academic Initiatives, Joyner and Laupus libraries. The exposition will be held from 10 a.m. to noon in the Mendenhall Student Center Great Room and from 2 to 4 pm. in the College of Nursing and College of Allied Health lobbies.

For additional information, contact the Joyner Library circulation desk at (252) 328-6518.

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A list of books pre-installed on the e-readers is available at http://media.lib.ecu.edu/techsrv/E-Books-List.cfm. Pre-loaded applications on the iPad are listed at http://blog.lib.ecu.edu/announce/?p=1145.[HTML3]



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