ECU honor society chapter to receive award

The East Carolina University Beta Nu chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International will receive its 10th Key Award during the organization’s 41st Biennial Convention, Oct. 29 through Nov. 2 in Grapevine, Texas.

The award is presented by the nursing honor society to recognize chapters that display evidence of successful membership recruitment and retention, publicity and programming, leadership development and international collaboration. Few chapters have receive the award as frequently as the ECU chapter.

###

Exotic locales enhance summer studies for ECU students

As part of a study abroad program, ECU students enjoyed snorkeling at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in Australia.

By Kathy Muse

Snorkeling in the waters of the largest coral formation in the world, experiencing the viability of tourism within a village community in the South Pacific, studying global health initiatives and the cultural implications of sport in European countries, were among the summer activities of students in the College of Health and Human Performance.

ECU students hiked to the base of Matterhorn Mountain in Switzerland as part of study abroad programs this summer.

Students in the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies visited Australia and Fiji.  The ecology and reef management policy at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in Australia was a highlight.  While examining how zone management works to protect the reef and the marine life that it nurtures, students had the opportunity to snorkel in the warm waters.

ECU student Kaliah Lewis of Burke, Va., was among the 13 participants.  “The most memorable part of the trip was visiting the Namosi Fijian village and meeting the chief,” she said.  “The chief gave us permission to kayak down the Luva River.  We saw the most amazing scenery and waterfalls.”

“The trip was unforgettable,” Lewis said.

Lewis is pursuing an undergraduate degree in recreation and park management.

Assistant professors Dr. Cliff Watts and Dr. Paige Schneider led the students on the trip. “I could see that students gained an appreciation for the type of tourism that has minimal impact on the culture and natural resources of Fiji,” Watts said.

The Department of Health Education and Promotion offered a study abroad program focused on global health, with 30 participants traveling to Switzerland and Italy.

Michelle Royal of Raleigh, who is pursuing an M.A. in health education, enjoyed experiencing different cultures. “The best part about the trip was visiting the World Health Organization and The International Red Cross,” she said.

Teaching instructor Karen Vail-Smith said the program included visits to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees and the University of Geneva Hospital Systems. “I think we’d all agree that hiking to the base of the Matterhorn was an unforgettable experience,” she said.

Plans are underway for a trip to Ireland next May (visit www.ecu.edu/hlth for more details).

The Department of Kinesiology’s study abroad program included visiting Germany, Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland and Italy. Nine ECU students looked at the organization of sport within the European society, sport operations in the global economy and the cultural implications of sports.

Assistant professor Dr. Stacey Warner lead the trip, which included visits to The International Olympic Museum, FIFA Headquarters, Red Bull Worldwide Headquarters, Ferrari Headquarters & Museum, Parma Panthers American Football Club, The Hague and German Sport Universities.

###

ECU’s Campus Dining launches sustainable ‘TOGO’ initiative

The "TOGO" logo represents a new sustainable dining initiative under way at ECU.

East Carolina University and Campus Dining have launched a new sustainable dining initiative that should reduce the amount of waste in landfills.

The TOGO program at Todd and West End Dining Halls replaces the disposable Styrofoam containers formally used for take-out meals with a new reusable container. The program will drastically reduce waste; more than 145,000 of the Styrofoam containers ended up in ECU’s trash last year. Organizers also hope the program will encourage responsible dining habits, build community in the dining halls and reduce overall costs.

Students who sign up for the program receive a reusable container they can use to take lunch or dinner out of the dining halls. When they return the used container at either dining hall, participants may receive either a clean, reusable container or a key tag they can present for a new container on their next visit.

Participants also receive a free 17 oz. aluminum TOGO beverage bottle for taking beverages from the dining halls. The bottles may also be refilled with a fountain beverage for $.99 at any Campus Dining location.

Styrofoam containers and paper cups will no longer be provided as take-out options.

For additional information about the TOGO program, contact Joyce Sealey at (252) 328-2822 or visit www.ecu.edu/dining (click on “Sustainable”) for instructions and a “How To” video.

###

ECU English professor co-edits collection, publishes article

A collection co-edited by Kirk St. Amant (English) and Barry Thatcher (New Mexico State University) was published by Baywood Publishing. Entitled “Teaching Intercultural Rhetoric and Technical Communication: Theories, Curriculum, Pedagogies, and Practices,” the collection includes works that examine pedagogical practices in technical communication (including program development and program assessment) in international contexts.

The collection includes St. Amant’s essay, “Thinking globally, teaching locally: Understanding the changing nature of technical communication in an age of globalization.”

Fall 2011 Medical History Interest Group Presentations

The Fall 2011 Medical History Interest Group will present a series of presentations this semester on the 4th floor Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery at the Laupus Library.

Scheduled are the following:  “Civil War Medicine,” by Dr. David E. Long, associate professor of history in the Harriot College of Arts of Sciences, 4:30 p.m. Aug. 29; “Hookworm History and Soils in NC: Massive Infection and Intervention 1910 – 1915,” by Dr. Alice Anderson, associate professor in the Department of Health Education and Promotion, 4:30 p.m. Sept. 26; “African-American Health Care Providers in the Civil War,” by Dr. David Dennard, associate professor of history and director of the African and African-American Studies Program, 4:30 p.m., Oct. 24; and “A History of Twin Studies,” by Dr. Charles Boklage, professor of pediatrics at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 28.

Refreshments will be provided. Lectures are sponsored by the Laupus Library History Collections & the Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies and may be videotaped.

For directions, visit: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/maps.cfm

Information about future presentations and videos of some past presentations are at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/HOM/index.cfm.

###

Student Activities Board hosts two exhibits at Mendenhall Gallery

The East Carolina University Student Activities Board will host two art exhibits in August and September at Mendenhall Student Center’s second floor gallery.

On display through Aug. 28 is “Cupcake Jungle,” a collaboration between ceramicist Kyle Rees and metalsmith/jewelry designers Joshua Craig and Laritza Garcia. The exhibition includes a collection of brightly-colored homemade bowls in porcelain and metal.

Real cupcakes will be served during the exhibit’s closing reception, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 26 in the Mendenhall gallery.

Following the close of “Cupcake Jungle,” an exhibition focused on travel and discovery will be presented in the gallery. The exhibit, “Get out. Go Somewhere,” opens with a reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 9.

The exhibit’s creator was Dan Willet, an ECU graduate student in the School of Art and Design’s photography program. Willet worked with nationally acclaimed artist Sam Yates to juror the exhibit. Yates will provide student critiques and present a lecture on his work at 6 p.m., Sept. 8 in Mendenall.

“Get out. Go Somewhere” will run through Sept. 30.

For more information, contact Tracy Demar at (252) 328-2902 or e- mail sabvisual@ecu.edu.

# # #

ECU study examines sleep and fatigue in chronically ill mothers

Carmel White

Mark White

 

Health care providers should be particularly attentive to supporting high quality sleep for chronically ill mothers of young children, according to a new study by East Carolina University researchers.

Professors Carmel White and Mark White in ECU’s Department of Child Development and Family Relations, examined the sleep patterns of chronically ill mothers with young children to determine how they manage sleep and fatigue. The researchers questioned 103 mothers with multiple sclerosis, 68 with rheumatoid arthritis and 91 with normal health about their sleep, fatigue, pain and levels of depression. All participants had at least once child between the age of 12 months and 45 months.

The researchers surveyed the mothers about their problems falling asleep; trouble sleeping after being awakened; sleep interruptions from their young children; average hours of sleep; and fatigue during the day.

“Understanding how sleep relates to depression and fatigue in mothers with MS or RA is important for mothers, families and health care providers,” said Dr. Carmel White.

She said families and health care providers should be sensitive to the importance of high quality sleep, doing what they can to support the mothers.

“Health care professionals should be especially sensitive to both pain and depression in mothers with MS or RA to ensure that these two common problems are not interfering with mothers’ sleep,” she said.

Mothers with chronic illnesses reported more daytime drowsiness, with reduced sleep quality and quantity especially noted in mothers experiencing a flareup of RA symptoms. Chronically ill mothers reported mother problems going to sleep and staying asleep, but were less likely to experience nighttime sleep interruptions caused by their children. The researchers speculated that other family members might be caring for the young children during the night, knowing that the mother has difficulty falling back to sleep.

Mothers with MS had the highest correlation of sleep problems correlated to fatigue, suggesting that health care providers who work with MS patients should include sleep assessments.

The researchers said that women with chronic illnesses often experience a great deal of fatigue, and parenting young children can add to the exhaustion.

Their research, “Sleep Problems and Fatigue in Chronically Ill Women,” appeared in the July issue of Behaviorial Sleep Medicine. Full text of the article may be viewed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21722010.

###

For additional information, contact Carmel White at 252-737-2075 or whitec@ecu.edu or Mark Shite at 252-737-2076 or whitem@ecu.edu.

The Department of Child Development and Family Relations is located within the ECU College of Human Ecology.

Nursing students invited to free event

EVENT CANCELED DUE TO HURRICANE IRENE

The North Carolina Association of Nursing Students will host a free event for nursing students Aug. 27 from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. in Rooms 1100 and 1102 in the East Carolina University College of Nursing, Health Sciences Building. Registration begins at 10:45 a.m.

The event, “Council of School Leaders,” will introduce students to the state’s professional nursing student organization, provide opportunities to get involved and offer workshops on being a leader and resume preparation and review.

Dr. Walter Houston, director of the Student Development and Counseling Center in the ECU College of Nursing, will speak on how being a leader creates success in nursing school and how to take advantage of leadership opportunities.

For more information, email event chair Jonathan Shaw at ncansdistrict4director@gmail.com or call 704-920-9127.

1 182 183 184 185 186 209