College of Nursing welcomes 125 new students

More than 100 ECU students were officially introduced to the nursing profession during the College of Nursing’s twice-annual Lamp of Learning ceremony on Aug. 31.

The ceremony, held in the Brody School of Medicine auditorium, recognized 125 new students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program as family and friends looked on.

Meaghan Brown receives her lamp pin from a classmate at the College of Nursing’s Lamp of Learning ceremony on Aug. 31. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Meaghan Brown receives her lamp pin from a classmate at the College of Nursing’s Lamp of Learning ceremony on Aug. 31. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

During the ceremony Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the college, reminded students of the university’s dedication to service, a value shared by the college and the nursing profession. She emphasized Gallup Poll data that has consistently pointed to nursing as the most trusted profession among all professions, and urged new students to remain honest and ethical in order to preserve that trust.

“That is a wonderful characteristic that we want to maintain and instill in our nursing students,” she said.

Dr. Annette Peery, associate dean for undergraduate programs, introduced each student on stage as Brown presented him or her with a gold lamp pin representing Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing. The lamp symbol signifies service and light, and is also featured on the College of Nursing pin that students receive at graduation.

“As you wear that pin, think of these symbols and what they mean, particularly your orientation to service as part of the profession,” Brown said.

Nursing student Taylor Harrison recites the College of Nursing pledge at the Lamp of Learning ceremony at the Brody School of Medicine on Aug. 31.

Nursing student Taylor Harrison recites the College of Nursing pledge at the Lamp of Learning ceremony at the Brody School of Medicine on Aug. 31.

Krista Whitley, a nursing student from Kinston, was among those having pins affixed to their purple scrubs.

“It’s really special,” she said. “It makes me want to work even harder. Ever since high school I’ve always wanted to be a nurse. I job shadowed in high school and observed a couple of surgeries. It really pumped me up and made me want to be a nurse.”

Admission to the College of Nursing’s BSN program is very competitive. In addition to meeting the university and college requirements, students’ scores on a required national pre-admission exam are taken into account along with their GPA, enrollment status and other factors. Students accepted into the program this year had an average GPA of 3.7.

Phyllis Burt attended the ceremony to watch her daughter Heavenlee Burt receive her pin.

“She worked hard for this and I love her. I am very proud of her,” Burt said. “I came a long way just to catch her in this moment. I think the world is going to be a better place.”

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communication

Phased retirement program available

Chancellor Cecil Staton has announced the annual availability of the phased retirement program for eligible tenured faculty members. Individual letters to eligible faculty members are being sent to home academic units. If a faculty member’s appointment does not meet the program’s eligibility criteria for age and years of service, he or she will not receive a letter of invitation to participate in the phased retirement program. Faculty members who do not receive a letter but believe that they should be eligible based on program criteria should contact their respective vice chancellor’s office for assistance.

Additional details about the phased retirement program are available at the following website: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/provostvc/formsandinfo.cfm

Questions about the phased retirement program should be directed to Linda Ingalls at 252-943-8584 or ingallsl@ecu.edu (Office of the Provost) or Lisa Hudson at 744-1910 or suttonli@ecu.edu (Division of Health Sciences).

Laupus Library exhibits “Fire and Freedom: Food and Enslavement in Early America”

Laupus Library is hosting the traveling exhibit “Fire and Freedom: Food and Enslavement in Early America” in the Evelyn Fike Laupus gallery on the fourth floor of the library.

On display from Aug. 28 through Oct. 7, the six-banner exhibit looks at the Chesapeake region, where European settlers relied upon indentured servants, Native Americans and African slave labor for life-saving knowledge of farming and food acquisition, and to gain economic prosperity.

By examining the labor of slaves and food practices of the time, including those at George Washington’s Mount Vernon, the exhibition explores how power was exchanged between and among different peoples, races, genders and classes during the early colonial era.

“I’m really excited that Laupus was selected to host this exhibit, primarily because eastern North Carolina is situated adjacent to the Chesapeake region and so this history hits close to home,” said Beth Ketterman, interim director of Laupus Library. “We’ll be able to supplement the panels and digital materials with artifacts and archival materials from our collection which I think will add an important dimension for our visitors.”

An online version of the exhibition available at www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/fireandfreedom/exhibition0.html features a range of resources for educators and students, including two lesson plans developed for elementary and high school courses, a higher education module for undergraduate and graduate students and instructors, online activities, and a compilation of online resources. In addition, it offers a digital gallery of 18th-century materials on food, botany, health and housekeeping from the NLM collection.

The exhibit is available during operating hours posted at www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/about/hours.cfm, or call 252-744-2219.

The exhibition was brought to you by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

For more information contact Kelly Dilda at 252-744-2232 or rogerske@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly Dilda, University Communications

Brody associate dean named to national steering committee

The associate dean for diversity and inclusion at ECU’s Brody School of Medicine has been selected to serve on the steering committee for the Association of American Medical Colleges’ Group on Diversity and Inclusion. In this role, Dr. Kendall Campbell will act as a liaison between the national committee and all medical schools in the southern region of the United States.

“It [my selection] puts Brody on the map, on the national landscape if you will, for diversity and inclusion issues,” Campbell said. “It allows me to bring issues that may be particular to Brody, to a national light. It really stresses Brody’s commitment to diversity and inclusion because I was nominated by folks here for this position. So it’s not something I just decided to do myself; there were people here that recognized that it would be good for me to serve on this committee.”

Dr. Kendall Campbell. (contributed photo)

Dr. Kendall Campbell. (contributed photo)

Brody is dedicated to increasing access to a medical education for minority and underserved students as part of its legislatively mandated threefold mission. Campbell’s office oversees eight groups within Brody that focus on diversity, such as the Sexual and Gender Diversity committee, the Brody Women Faculty committee and the Interprofessional Diversity Group. The Office of Diversity Affairs has also developed workshops that focus on the various aspects of diversity and inclusion to promote retention of minority faculty and a more inclusive environment at Brody.

According to a recent AAMC report, Brody ranks better than 90 percent of the nation’s medical schools when it comes to the percentage of its graduates who are African American. Nearly one-third of Brody’s newest class is non-Caucasian.

Campbell said that while Brody does better than many medical schools when it comes to maintaining a culture of diversity, there is still work to be done.

“My goal for us is to be at parity with the state,” he said. “Because we only accept North Carolina residents, I look at the state census population as to what should be our representation. So if there’s a certain percentage of racial minorities in the state, then that’s what we want to see reflected in our medical school classes.”

Campbell earned his medical degree from the University of Florida College of Medicine and completed a residency in family medicine at the Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare Family Practice Residency Program. Before coming to Brody in 2016, he was on faculty at Florida State University College of Medicine, where he was the co-founder and co-director of the Center for Underrepresented Minorities in Academic Medicine.

In addition to his AAMC appointment, Campbell was recently named a member of the Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities for the National Academy of Medicine. He is also the director of the Research Group for Underrepresented Minorities in Academic Medicine at Brody.

“Dr. Campbell is a nationally recognized expert in the field of diversity and inclusion in medical school communities,” said Brody’s interim dean, Dr. Nicholas Benson. “His appointment to this important national leadership body demonstrates that the Association of American Medical Colleges recognizes that Kendall’s participation will bring an important voice to their discussions that have positive impact for medical education and research across the country.”

The AAMC Group on Diversity and Inclusion is a national forum aimed at advancing diversity in the medical academic setting, keeping institutions informed about the benefits of diversity and highlighting the importance of addressing issues pertaining to historically underrepresented populations. Ultimately, the goal of the committee is to provide better care to the underserved through a more diverse medical workforce.

“I think the most encouraging trend is that [diversity] is on people’s minds,” said Campbell. “And not only that it’s on their minds, but people are moving from a place of tolerating diversity to recognizing diversity benefit.”

 

-by Angela Todd, University Communication 

 

New director of Laupus Health Sciences Library announced

East Carolina University’s Board of Trustees approved the appointment of Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman as the new director of ECU’s William Laupus Health Sciences Library during a special called meeting Friday, Aug. 25.

Ketterman is an associate professor and has served as interim director of Laupus Library since November 2015. She has worked in various positions within ECU’s libraries for 16 years and will begin her new role Sept. 1.

“I am excited and humbled by the opportunity to lead the Laupus Library, particularly at this time in our university’s history as we seek to grow the research enterprise,” said Ketterman. “Laupus will contribute meaningfully to those efforts by innovating our services and collections in response to our faculty and students’ health-related information needs.”

Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

As director, Ketterman will oversee library operations and services, including those of the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey, N.C. She currently serves on several committees at ECU including the Medical and Health Sciences Foundation Board and Discovery Advisory Board.

“Ms. Ketterman is an accomplished researcher and administrator and brings a wealth of experience to the role as director of the William Laupus Health Sciences Library,” said Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor for the Division of Health Sciences at ECU.

Ketterman received her undergraduate degree from the College of William & Mary and a master’s degree in library science from North Carolina Central University. She is an American Association of Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) Fellow and received a leadership scholarship from the organization in 2015. She was also a recipient of the Medical Library Association Daniel T. Richards MLA Collection Development award.

Ketterman’s research efforts include 23 combined publications, articles and presentations in the arena of library science with a focus on collection development, electronic health information awareness, and implementation of electronic resources and technology in medical science libraries.

 

-by Jamie Smith

Inaugural Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge is Live

The College of Business and its Miller School of Entrepreneurship (MSOE) wants to enhance ECU’s entrepreneurial culture.

The inaugural Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge is a three-round competition open to any student enrolled in the 2017/2018 academic year, as well as alumni who have enrolled students on their team.

Total prize money to accelerate winning business ventures is $20,000 with $12,500 going to the grand prize winner. $5,000 and $2,500 will be awarded to second and third place winners, respectively. Payment will be delivered to the winners as they achieve pre-approved milestones. Other in-kind prizes will be awarded.

The Miller School of Entrepreneurship team includes Vickie Glover, front; and in back, from left to right, Dennis Barber, Corey Pulido and David Mayo. (Contributed photo)

The Miller School of Entrepreneurship team includes Vickie Glover, front; and in back, from left to right, Dennis Barber, Corey Pulido and David Mayo. (Contributed photo)

“We are excited to bring an opportunity to all of ECU that will highlight promising student entrepreneurs across campus,” said Dr. Mike Harris, interim director of MSOE. “The students will engage with the MSOE for coaching and resources to accelerate the growth of their award-winning ideas.”

Round one is an open-air forum for participants to showcase their ideas and ventures. This poster session is Oct. 17 from 12 – 2 p.m. in the Sculpture Garden outside of Mendenhall Student Center. Student passersby will get three tickets to allocate to their idea (or ideas) of choice. Twelve teams will move on to the second round based on student popular vote and input from ECU college representatives.

Round two will feature five mentors who will choose five teams based on a five-minute pitch and responses to a three-minute Q&A session. The MSOE will mentor a team based on the popular student vote from round one. This round will take place Wednesday, Nov. 15, from 5 – 7 p.m. Location TBD. Six teams will move on to the final round.

Round three (and final round) will be held during National Entrepreneurship Week Feb. 22 from 6 – 8 p.m. in the Murphy Center. The six finalists will present a five-minute pitch followed by five minutes of Q & As. A keynote speaker will address the finalists. A panel of university and community entrepreneurship leaders will choose the winner.

Established in 2015, the MSOE serves as a regional hub for preparing students to take an entrepreneurial mindset and skillset into their communities. To date, MSOE faculty has worked with approximately 349 students and 28 business clients. Students have recorded more than 6,000 hours of fieldwork.

Student teams who want to participate in the Challenge can register here.

Additional information about the Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge can be found at the Miller School of Entrepreneurship website.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

Joyner Library celebrates excellence in student research and writing

Joyner Library announced the winners of its annual W. Keats Sparrow Writing Award for student research during an Aug. 23 ceremony held in the Janice L. Faulkner Gallery, located on the second floor of the library.

Sponsored by the Friends of Joyner Library, the W. Keats Sparrow Writing Award was named in honor of Dr. W. Keats Sparrow, professor emeritus of English and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The award recognizes excellence in research and writing by students enrolled in English 1100 and 2201 composition classes during the summer and fall of 2016 and spring of 2017 semesters.

“Every August as the fall semester begins, we have the pleasure of recognizing three students whose English composition papers were selected for the W. Keats Sparrow Award,” said Jan Lewis, director for Joyner Library. “It is a wonderful way to start the new academic year and reaffirm the close connections between Joyner Library and the Department of English.”

Eligibility criteria required students’ papers to include a research component using Joyner Library’s resources.

Entries were judged on the quality of the research as well as the quality of the writing by a panel comprised of faculty from the Department of English and Joyner Library. Members of this year’s panel included: Dr. Tracy Ann Morse, director of composition/writing foundations; Grace Horne, teaching instructor, Department of English; and Meghan Wanucha, coordinator of instructional assessment, Joyner Library.

Winning the award for first place — and a $500 prize — was Jasmine M. Perry, in the department of Psychology in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts & Sciences, for “Homophobic Attitudes in Men.”

“This award means a lot to me,” said Perry. “In my life I have never been first place at anything, so winning this award shows how I have grown as a person, and it shows how dedicated I am to my area of study.”

(Left to right) Grace Horne, Tracy Morse, Jenna Murdock, Jasmine Perry, Meghan Wanucha, and David Hisle. (Photo contributed by Joyner Library.)

(Left to right) Grace Horne, Tracy Morse, Jenna Murdock, Jasmine Perry, Meghan Wanucha, and David Hisle. (Photo contributed by Joyner Library.)

Perry said the inspiration behind her winning paper came from personal experiences with friends and family members that are homosexual.

“I know that ‘coming out’ is a hard thing to do, and it requires a lot of confidence and a strong support system,” she said. “If people around you are homophobic it can lead to emotional turmoil and possibly suicide. I am so empathetic when I hear or read stories about people being bullied or abused due to their sexuality.”

Two additional award winners were:

  • Jenna M. Murdock, majoring in elementary education in the College of Education, in second place — a $300 prize — for “Motivating Students to Read.”
  • Carly E. Shomsky, in the department of Recreation and Leisure Studies in the College of Health and Human Performance, in third place — a $150 prize — for “Sensory Processing Disorder.”

Second-place winner Jenna Murdock said the competition was the perfect opportunity for her to do more research on how to motivate students to read required texts. “I really enjoyed putting this paper together and it was more than just an assignment I completed for a grade,” she said. “I was able to learn so much new and valuable information that will help me become a better teacher in the future.”

“I think it’s wonderful that Joyner Library offers awards and competitions for students,” she said. “It helps further our writing skills and allows us to explore the many resources offered by the library.”

Carly Shomsky, the third-place winner, believes students really benefit from the opportunity to participate in Joyner Libraries awards and competitions. “It not only encourages students to receive good grades, but it also offers them the feeling of accomplishment,” she said.

“This award showed me how far I have come within my writing and as a person. Hard work and determination really do pay off.”

Also deserving recognition are the instructors of the English 2201 sections that produced the winners.  Dr. Tracy Ann Morse was Jasmine Perry’s and Jenna Murdock’s instructor, and Marc Petersen was Carly Shomsky’s instructor.

“This year’s award recipients clearly selected topics relevant to their lives and majors and used the assignment to improve their discipline-based research and writing skills,” said Lewis. “Congratulations to each of them for their outstanding work.”

For more information on how to participate in next year’s awards, contact David Hisle at 328-4978 or by email at hisled@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

ECU bookstore donates to local ALS chapter from sale of T-shirts

East Carolina University’s Dowdy Student Stores and its vendor, Perfect Promotions & More of Apex, presented a check for $5,250 to the ALS Association North Carolina Chapter. The check presentation was held Aug. 16 at Clark-LeClair stadium and featured representatives from the ALS Association, Dowdy Student Stores, Perfect Promotions and ECU baseball coach Cliff Godwin.

The money was raised through sales of “Strike Out ALS” T-shirts at ECU Dowdy Student Stores on campus and the souvenir booth at Clark-LeClair Stadium during baseball season. A portion of the sale of each shirt was donated by both Dowdy Student Stores and their vendor, Perfect Promotions & More of Apex, N.C.

(Left to right) Dowdy Student Stores Apparel & Merchandise Manager, John Palmer ALS Association North Carolina Chapter Board Chair, Mark Anthony, Down East Walk to Defeat ALS Committee Member, Michael Cotter, ALS Association North Carolina Chapter President & CEO, Jerry Dawson, Dowdy Student Stores Associate Director, Bob Walker, Dowdy Student Stores Director, Bryan Tuten, Perfect Promotions Vice President of Sales Stephen McFadden and Pirate Baseball Coach Cliff Godwin. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

(Left to right) Dowdy Student Stores Apparel & Merchandise Manager, John Palmer, ALS Association North Carolina Chapter Board Chair, Mark Anthony, Down East Walk to Defeat ALS Committee Member, Michael Cotter, ALS Association North Carolina Chapter President & CEO, Jerry Dawson, Dowdy Student Stores Associate Director, Bob Walker, Dowdy Student Stores Director, Bryan Tuten, Perfect Promotions Vice President of Sales Stephen McFadden and Pirate Baseball Coach Cliff Godwin. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Dowdy Student Stores director Bryan Tuten said he was pleased that the Pirate Nation fan base was so supportive of the shirts. “Pirate fans have always been supportive of the cause-related T-shirts sold through our store on campus,” said Tuten. The university-owned and operated bookstore also sells fund-raising T-shirts for military appreciation and pediatric cancer awareness during the fall semester.

Perfect Promotions vice president of sales Stephen McFadden is also proud to play a role in the effort. As a vendor of Dowdy Student Stores and an ECU alumnus, McFadden enjoys partnering with the store on projects that give back to the local community.

Over the past three years, the collaboration between Perfect Promotions and Dowdy Student Stores has generated more than $35,000 for a variety of local charities. The next “Cool Tee for a Cause” will come out in late August and will benefit pediatric cancer awareness. According to Dowdy merchandise manager John Palmer, it will be a gold T-shirt, perfect for the Paint it Gold football game.

ECU’s bookstore is a self-operated, university-run store. It receives no state funding. Instead, the campus bookstore maintains its services through sales. Profits are then directed back to campus through scholarship contributions and a variety of other donations to campus projects.

Attending the check presentation (left to right) were ECU Dowdy Student Stores apparel and merchandise manager John Palmer, ALS Association North Carolina Chapter board chair Mark Anthony, Down East Walk to Defeat ALS committee member Michael Cotter, ALS Association North Carolina chapter president & CEO Jerry Dawson, ECU Dowdy Student Stores associate director Bob Walker, ECU Dowdy Student Stores director Bryan Tuten, Perfect Promotions vice president of sales Stephen McFadden and ECU baseball coach Cliff Godwin.

 

Dowdy Student Stores: Bryan Tuten, Director, (252) 328-6731 and Leslie Craigle, Marketing Director, (252) 737-1310

Grant funds energy needs, education at community center

Dr. Ranjeet Agarwala (top left) and students at the Lucille Gorham Intergenerational Center test solar panels and a portable power station. (Photos by Erik Panarusky)

Dr. Ranjeet Agarwala (top left) and students at the Lucille Gorham Intergenerational Center test solar panels and a portable power station. (Photos by Erik Panarusky)

The Lucille Gorham Intergenerational Community Center will soon have some help with its electrical needs thanks to the sun, students and faculty in the East Carolina University College of Engineering and Technology, and a Constellation E2 Energy to Educate grant.

CET students partnered with the center to study its needs, equipment, appliances and layout, then conducted an energy audit to calculate the total energy consumption and the rate of energy consumption on a daily and monthly basis, said Dr. Ranjeet Agarwala, assistant professor in the Department of Technology Systems.

“We had originally talked about putting solar panels on the roof,” Agarwala said, but based on the center’s needs, a more portable and adaptable system was chosen.

The $37,500 grant funded the purchase of 18 100-watt solar panels and nine portable power stations. Each power station can be charged from the solar panels and can provide power for anything from charging a cell phone to running a refrigerator.

Deborah Moody, director of LGCC, said the center’s campus includes six buildings, so the flexibility of the portable systems made perfect sense.

“We wanted it to be simple and never have an excuse not to use it,” she said.

The panels and power packs can be used during outdoor events, instead of running extension cords everywhere. They will also allow the center to function during power outages.

“Last year when we had the hurricane, we still had to come in because the community still has needs,” Moody said. “But we didn’t have any power in the building. So this would allow us to charge our laptops and go to work like we usually do.”

Agarwala shows students at the Lucille Gorham Intergenerational Center how the unit can power a computer.

Agarwala shows students at the Lucille Gorham Intergenerational Center how the unit can power a computer.

 

In addition to offsetting daily energy consumption needs, powering events and emergency use, there’s an educational component. The center has STEM-based after-school and summer programs, and the students will be able to learn about topics ranging from energy conservation to converting units of power.

Each power station has multiple AC and DC outlets, as well as a digital display showing energy input and usage. The panels and the power stations can be connected in different combinations depending on specific energy needs.

During a demonstration of the equipment, the students were able to see how much energy was being generated by the solar panels and the impact of shadows, as well as the amount of energy drawn by a charging cell phone.

“It’s exciting to watch the kids light up,” Moody said. “We want to get them excited and interested in these fields to prime them and train them, and then have them grow up and contribute to the community.

“We also want the youth to help us think of other ways to use these to help save energy. And then they’ll become advocates at home with their parents, and tell them, ‘These are things we can do to save energy in the house.’”

The LGCC opened in 2007 and is operated through a partnership between ECU, the City of Greenville and Pitt Community College. Constellation’s E2 Energy to Educate grants fund student projects focusing on energy science, technology and education.

The solar panels and power stations, funded by an E2 Energy to Educate grant from Constellation, will be used for events, emergency power and daily energy needs at the center.

The solar panels and power stations, funded by an E2 Energy to Educate grant from Constellation, will be used for events, emergency power and daily energy needs at the center.

 

By Jules Norwood

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