ECU Model UN Club Succeeds in Washington, D.C.

ECU’s Model UN Club competing in the National Model UN competition in Washington, D.C. (contributed photo)

ECU’s Model UN Club competing in the National Model UN competition in Washington, D.C. (contributed photo)

Model UN Club competed in the National Model United Nations competition in Washington, D.C. November 3-5. The club attended two conferences last year in Atlanta and Charlotte, where the group won delegation awards, sparking their interest in attending this year’s national competition. At this year’s national event, the students competed against more than 60 colleges, including schools from China, Japan, Nigeria, Italy, and France, and they received a conference-wide delegation award. ECU students who attended and participated in the competition include Mariama Abubakri, Haley Creef (MUN Club President), Dylan Fulp, Zachary Hollopeter, Andrew McLeer (MUN Club Vice President), Gabriela Morales, Aji Njie, Kaitlyn Rose, Sorrell Saunders, and Braxton Smallwood.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

College of Education inducts 18 into its Hall of Fame

Eighteen people were inducted into the ECU Educators Hall of Fame during a ceremony on Oct. 28.

The new members are Joseph B. Atkins of Oxford, Mississippi, Alan R. Bailey of Ayden, Cindi Branch Brown of Winterville, Michael Landreth Donnell of West End, the late Regina Figueiredo-Brown of Greenville, Sharon Harris Floyd of Greenville, Lawrence Jay Hodgkins of Washington, Gwenlyn Goodson Jeffreys of Greensboro, Megon Ann Clayton Mancini of Concord, Dionna Leigh Draper Manning of Winterville, the late Ernest Roy McNair, Jr., of Washington, Rodney Lynn McNeill of Winterville, Karen Catoe Meetze of Greenville, the late Miriam Grace Sexton Mitchell of Charlotte, Sarah DeRitter Mitchelson of Greenville, Tara Wooten Parker of Greenville, Sandra Kay Eldridge Seay of Winterville, and Edison Earl Watson of Raleigh.

Members of the 2017 class of inductees to the ECU College of Education Educator’s Hall of Fame include, back row, from left to right, Megon Ann Clayton, a representative of the late Regina Figueiredo-Brown, Joseph B. Atkins, Lawrence Jay Hodgkins, a representative of the late Miriam Grace Sexton Mitchell, Rodney Lynn McNeill, a representative of the late Ernest Roy McNair, Jr., Edison Earl Watson, Sharon Harris Floyd, Michael Landreth Donnell and Alan R. Bailey. Front row, from left to right, Karen Catoe Meetze, Sarah DeRitter Mitchelson, Sandra Kay Eldridge, Tara Wooten Parker, Cindi Branch Brown and Dionna Leigh Draper Manning. (contributed photo)

Members of the 2017 class of inductees to the ECU College of Education Educator’s Hall of Fame include, back row, from left to right, Megon Ann Clayton, a representative of the late Regina Figueiredo-Brown, Joseph B. Atkins, Lawrence Jay Hodgkins, a representative of the late Miriam Grace Sexton Mitchell, Rodney Lynn McNeill, a representative of the late Ernest Roy McNair, Jr., Edison Earl Watson, Sharon Harris Floyd, Michael Landreth Donnell and Alan R. Bailey. Front row, from left to right, Karen Catoe Meetze, Sarah DeRitter Mitchelson, Sandra Kay Eldridge, Tara Wooten Parker, Cindi Branch Brown and Dionna Leigh Draper Manning. (contributed photo)

The event raised more than $27,000 for student scholarships in the College of Education.

Each inductee was sponsored with a monetary gift of $1,000 or more in support of the college’s Educators Hall of Fame Scholarship endowment. Annual interest from the endowment is used to fund merit-based scholarships for education students.

Since 1999, the Educators Hall of Fame has recognized the service and contributions of more than 469 individuals who have impacted the lives of others, the field of education and the College of Education at ECU. The annual event has raised more than $574,000 toward the endowment goal of $1 million for scholarships.

For more information, contact Terah Archie in the College of Education’s Office of Community Relations and Outreach at Archiet15@ecu.edu or 252-737-1257.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Brody dean launches staff initiative

Brody School of Medicine Dean Mark Stacy. (contributed photo)

Brody School of Medicine Dean Mark Stacy. (contributed photo)

The dean of ECU’s Brody School of Medicine, Dr. Mark Stacy, is seeking suggestions from Brody employees about how to “build a better Brody,” and he’s setting aside $100,000 to put their best ideas into practice.

The Brody Staff Leadership Initiative seeks to tap into the knowledge, experience and creativity of the medical school’s employees to improve office efficiency, morale, the work environment and the overall culture at Brody, Stacy said.

“Those employees who are closest to a process, who work in a certain area on a daily basis, are the ones who can best identify how to make things work better,” said Stacy. “I want to empower those people to influence positive change. This is their chance to make a difference.”

All Brody SHRA and CSS staff are eligible to submit a proposal. While employees are encouraged to work in groups to strengthen their requests, proposals from individuals will also be considered.

The deadline for entries is Dec. 15, 2017.

All submissions will be reviewed by a representative group of Brody staff and the Dean’s Administrative Leadership Team. Winners will be announced at a ceremony and celebration event Jan. 10.

All requests – and any questions – should be submitted to Gary Vanderpool, executive associate vice chancellor for health sciences administration and finance, at vanderpoolg@ecu.edu.

For the proposal guidelines and template, visit www.ecu.edu/med/better.

 

-by Amy Ellis, University Communications

ECU Health Sciences Vice Chancellor honored by alma mater

East Carolina University’s vice chancellor for health sciences was recently honored by her alma mater for her leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship that has advanced nursing on both state and national levels.

Dr. Phyllis Horns was presented the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing’s 2017 Distinguished Alumni Award, the most prestigious alumni award the school bestows.

“It is an honor to count Dr. Horns as an alumna of the UAB School of Nursing and celebrate her contributions to nursing and health care,” said Dr. Doreen Harper, dean. “She has had a long and distinguished career in nursing and health care leadership, and is an exemplar among our alumnae nursing leaders across the globe… [her] collaborative leadership transcends discipline-specific boundaries, a hallmark of the UAB School of Nursing’s mission and vision.”

Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor, ECU health sciences. (contributed photo)

Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor, ECU health sciences. (contributed photo)

Horns earned a bachelor’s in nursing at ECU, a master’s in public health at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and a pediatric nurse practitioner certificate at the University of Rochester.

In 1980 she completed her Ph.D. in nursing at UAB – Birmingham, where she joined the graduate faculty and was later named assistant dean for undergraduate programs.

Horns came to ECU in 1988 as professor and chair of the Department of Parent-Child Nursing and was named dean of the School of Nursing two years later. Under her leadership the school experienced tremendous growth, with overall enrollment increasing by 50 percent and graduate class sizes expanding from 93 to 377 students.

With Horns at the helm, the school’s doctoral program was established in 2002, and the school officially became the College of Nursing in 2007.

Appointed ECU’s vice chancellor for health sciences in 2009, Horns now oversees the education and patient care programs of the Brody School of Medicine, the College of Allied Health Sciences, the College of Nursing, the William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library, the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU and the School of Dental Medicine – the latter of which was launched under her leadership.

She played a key role in planning for the clinical integration of ECU Physicians and Vidant Medical Group, slated for completion in 2018. And she’s spearheading efforts to expand ECU’s Department of Public Health into a School of Public Health.

Over her career Horns has been president of the Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing and the Southeastern Regional Education Board, a member of the National League for Nursing board of directors, and chair of the NLN Accrediting Commission.

Her many accolades include the 2010 UAB School of Nursing Visionary Leader award, the 2011 ECU College of Nursing Distinguished Alumni Award and the North Carolina Hospital Association 2016 Meritorious Service Award. In 2001 she was inducted as a fellow into the American Academy of Nursing.

“Attending UAB was a privilege and I treasure the impact it has had on my career,” Horns said. “This award means so much to me, and I see it as a highlight of my life’s work. I look forward to continuing that work and to the bright future of ECU’s health sciences.”

 

-by Angela Todd, University Communications

ECU faculty members inducted as FAANS

College of Nursing faculty members Dr. Sonya Hardin, left, and Dr. Donna Lake, right, were inducted as Fellows in the American Academy of Nursing. They are pictured at the induction ceremony with Dr. Susan Kennerly, a professor in the College of Nursing who was inducted as a Fellow in 2016. (Contributed photos)

College of Nursing faculty members Dr. Sonya Hardin, left, and Dr. Donna Lake, right, were inducted as Fellows in the American Academy of Nursing. They are pictured at the induction ceremony with Dr. Susan Kennerly, a professor in the College of Nursing who was inducted as a Fellow in 2016. (Contributed photos)

Two East Carolina University (ECU) faculty members were recently inducted as fellows in the American Academy of Nursing. The College of Nursing’s Dr. Sonya Hardin and Dr. Donna Lake were honored during a ceremony at the academy’s annual conference Oct. 5-7, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

“I am proud to welcome this talented cohort of nurses as they join the ranks of the nation’s foremost health care thought leaders,” said Academy President Bobbie Berkowitz. “They bring a rich variety of expertise to the table, and we look forward to recognizing their accomplishments at our policy conference, and then working with them to transform health policy, practice, and research by applying our collective nursing knowledge.”

Selection criteria include evidence of significant contributions to nursing and health care, and sponsorship by two current Academy fellows. Applicants are reviewed by a panel comprised of elected and appointed fellows, and selection is based, in part, on the extent the nominee’s nursing career has influenced health policies and the health and wellbeing of all.

Dr. Sonya Hardin

Dr. Sonya Hardin

Hardin is a professor and the associate dean of Graduate Nursing Programs in the College of Nursing. She leads an interdisciplinary team as the program director for a $2.5 million Health Resources & Services Administration-funded Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program grant.

With extensive national service with the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses setting national standards and developing the AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care, Hardin has impacted more than 80,000 acute and critical care nurses currently certified worldwide in adult, pediatric and neonatal critical care. She has disseminated the model through consulting at hospitals across the United States. She is certified in critical care and as an Adult Nurse Practitioner. She received her nurse practitioner training from ECU, a PhD from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and post-doctoral fellowships at UNC-Chapel Hill and Stanford University.

“It is an honor to be selected as a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing,” Hardin said. “My goal has been to make a difference in the outcomes of patient care and to strengthen the profession through patient advocacy. I am excited to have an opportunity to work with leaders within the US and from around the world to advance health policy and clinical practice.”

Lake is a clinical associate professor of advanced nursing practice and education. She has extensive international experience leading healthcare and academic teams within the Middle East, Europe, Latin America and Africa. Prior to ECU, she spent 25 years in various executive and clinical nursing roles culminating as Colonel in the U.S. Air Force. She has also played an instrumental role in the improvement of corporate quality policies, health promotion and primary care for 68 medical facilities worldwide.

Dr. Donna Lake

Dr. Donna Lake

Lake is the only nurse representative on the $11 million American Medical Association grant-funded initiative Redesigning Education to Accelerate Change in Healthcare (REACH), creating the first of its kind “Teachers in Quality Academy.” She received her BSN from Stony Brook University of New York, a Master’s of Education from the University of Oklahoma and a PhD from Touro University.

“Being inducted as a Fellow into the American Academy of Nursing is a very exciting and a prestigious honor,” Lake said. “Having met many of the Fellows during the induction and conference, it was incredible to learn of their expansive clinical, research, and global and national leadership impacts to the profession of nursing and healthcare delivery systems.

“I am more energized and look forward to my Fellow responsibilities and ECU faculty role to continue my work in engaging with other health leaders in transforming American’s health system, strengthening nursing and health delivery systems, nationally and internationally.”

Hardin and Lake are among 11 inductees from the state of North Carolina this year. They join five other current ECU College of Nursing faculty members as FAANs.

The academy is comprised of more than 2,500 nurse leaders in education, management, practice, policy and research. Fellows include hospital and government administrators, college deans and renowned scientific researchers.

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communications

First-Generation College Celebration

First-generation students are defined broadly (neither parent has completed a four-year degree) or narrowly (neither parent has any postsecondary education).  With nearly one-third of freshman cohorts across the country designated first-generation, colleges and universities are building programs and resources specific to them and their needs.  ECU is no different.

According to the 2014 Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement (BCSSE) survey, between one-third and one-half of all first-time, full-time students entering ECU in Fall 2014 would be considered first generation students. For example, 55% of respondents to BCSSE indicated that no parent/guardian had a bachelor’s degree or higher and 33% indicated no parent had any schooling beyond high school. (Note: The 2017 BCSSE was administered during this past summer orientation).  

ECU is poised to continue intentional program for first-generation students and their families in order to address the challenges and needs of these students.  We begin by joining institutions around the country in celebrating first-generation college students, faculty, and staff on our campus.

Sponsored by NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education and the American Association of Colleges & Universities (AACU), and ECU’s Division of Student Affairs, the inaugural First-Generation College Celebration is being celebrated nationally on November 8, 2017.  As a first-generation administrator, faculty, staff, and/or student, we invite you to join us in celebration.

Please respond at this link: https://ecu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2b0krEvnCxzQ7Bj

 

For more information, contact Dr. Mary Beth Corbin at corbinm@ecu.edu or 252-328-4173.

 

 

 

ECU Neurology confirmed as leader in MS care

ECU Physicians Neurology, a leading provider of care for people living with multiple sclerosis in eastern North Carolina, has been recognized as an official Partner in MS Care by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

This formal designation honors the practice’s commitment to providing exceptional MS care, and to working closely with the society to address the challenges of people affected by the disease. ECU first received the Partner in MS Care designation in 2013, and the renewal reflects the practice’s continued efforts to provide the highest quality care.

“This renewal of Partner in MS Care really is an extraordinary demonstration of the partnership that ECU has had with the National MS Society,” said Kristina Fransel, president of the Greater Carolinas Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. “We renew it to make sure you’re dotting your i’s and crossing your t’s, but also that we’re fulfilling our end of the bargain as a partner to you in delivering the best quality health care to people with multiple sclerosis, which is the highest priority for the National MS Society.”

ECU Physicians Neurology received a renewal of its Partner in MS Care designation from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Pictured from left are Kristina Fransel, president of the Greater Carolinas Chapter of the National MS Society; Dr. Robert Frere, clinical associate professor, ECU Physicians Neurology; Lovie Powers, RN; and Paige Dalton, development and programs coordinator, Greater Carolinas Chapter of the National MS Society. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

ECU Physicians Neurology received a renewal of its Partner in MS Care designation from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Pictured from left are Kristina Fransel, president of the Greater Carolinas Chapter of the National MS Society; Dr. Robert Frere, clinical associate professor, ECU Physicians Neurology; Lovie Powers, RN; and Paige Dalton, development and programs coordinator, Greater Carolinas Chapter of the National MS Society. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

Fransel recognized Dr. Robert Frere, medical director for ECU Physicians Neurology, for his efforts, which have resulted in doubling the number of patients with multiple sclerosis served by the practice. In addition to providing top-notch clinical care, she said, the Partner in MS Care designation recognizes the practice’s work in fundraising and advocacy for MS patients.

Joseph Hodges, clinical administrative manager for ECU Physicians Neurology, said the practice is committed to providing services across the continuum of care for patients with MS, having a medical director (Frere) with certification in treating patients with MS, and coordinating patient services with other providers including hospital services, urology and psychology.

MS is a chronic, unpredictable disease of the central nervous system in which the body’s immune system incorrectly attacks healthy tissue in the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves, disrupting the flow of information between the brain, spinal cord and other parts of the body.

Symptoms can range from relatively benign to disabling and include blurred vision, loss of balance, poor coordination, slurred speech, tremors, numbness, extreme fatigue, memory and concentration problems, paralysis and blindness. It is estimated that more than 2.3 million people worldwide are affected by MS.

ECU Physicians Neurology is the largest and most comprehensive neurological medical practice in eastern North Carolina. Frere, who is board-certified in neurology and psychiatry, holds a specialty certification in neurophysiology.

The practice provides MS diagnosis, neuropsychological or cognitive evaluation and treatment, ongoing MS medical and symptom management, pain management, and patient and family education. The clinic also participates in MS clinical trials and research.

ECU Physicians Neurology is located at 2280 Hemby Lane in Greenville. For an appointment, call (252) 744-9400, or toll-free 1-800-775-4840. For more information about the practice visit ecu.edu/ecuphysicians.

 

-by Jules Norwood, ECU News Services

ECU Physicians enrolling patients in breast cancer treatment study

ECU Physicians, the clinical practice of the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University (ECU), is enrolling patients in a nationwide clinical study designed to evaluate a potential new treatment option for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

Called HER2CLIMB, the study will evaluate the medication tucatinib in combination with standard treatments for patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer, with or without brain metastases. Tucatinib is an oral medication that can be taken at home.

HER2-positive breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that tests positive for a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). HER2 promotes the aggressive spread of cancer cells. The American Cancer Society estimates that 20 to 25 percent of the approximately 234,000 annual breast cancer diagnoses in the U.S. are HER2-positive.

ECU oncologist Dr. Mahvish Muzaffar (contributed photo)

ECU oncologist Dr. Mahvish Muzaffar (contributed photo)

“Patients who have been diagnosed with HER2-positive breast cancer and whose cancer has metastasized may benefit from treatment with HER2-targeted therapies,” said Eric P. Winer, M.D., chair of the HER2CLIMB International Steering Committee, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Breast Oncology Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

“This investigational medication is designed to inhibit the activity of HER2 and is being evaluated in combination with other approved therapies. The HER2CLIMB trial will enroll patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to the brain, a patient population that is often excluded from clinical trials,” Winer added.

Historically, HER2-positive disease has been associated with shorter survival times as well as a higher risk of recurrence and brain metastases. Over the past two decades, the approvals of four other targeted treatments have led to slower progression of the disease and improved survival rates for HER2-positive patients.

Yet the need for new therapies remains, according to ECU oncologist Dr. Mahvish Muzaffar.

“Brody is dedicated to advancing new treatment options for advanced HER2-positive breast cancer through studies like HER2CLIMB,” Muzaffar said. “Despite treatment advances, there is still a significant need for new therapies that can impact the lives of patients with advanced HER2-positive breast cancer – including cancer that has spread to the brain – and that can be tolerated for long periods of time.”

The safety and effectiveness of tucatinib has not yet been established. As with other anti-cancer treatments, this investigational treatment may or may not provide benefit and may cause side effects.

To be eligible for this study, patients must have locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. In addition, patients must have already been treated with four common breast cancer therapies – taxane (Taxotereâ or Taxolâ), trastuzumab (Herceptinâ), pertuzumab (Perjetaâ), and T-DM1 (Kadcylaâ).

Enrolled participants will receive standard, approved treatments. In addition, they may also receive the investigational medication tucatinib.

To learn more about the HER2CLIMB study, including eligibility criteria, visit HER2CLIMB.com or call the Leo Jenkins Cancer Center at 252-744-1888.

ECU students to participate in National Model UN

Ten East Carolina University students are participating in the National Model United Nations competition in Washington, D.C. this Nov. 3-5. ECU’s Model UN Club attended two conferences last year in Atlanta and Charlotte, where the group won delegation awards, sparking their interest in attending this year’s national competition.

Flags of the United Nations  (contributed photo)

Flags of the United Nations (contributed photo)

ECU’s team of eight undergraduate and two graduate students from the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences will represent the country of Poland. Two students are assigned to one of five committees, where they debate issues amongst other teams representing various countries. The overall goal is to create feasible solutions to real-world issues.

“I am very excited for this conference,” said Haley Creef, ECU Model UN Club president and sophomore majoring in economics, finance and political science. “This conference will be made up of students from all over the country. So it will be extremely exciting to be around so many like-minded, yet diverse individuals.”

Dr. Marie Olson Lounsbery, associate professor of political science, is serving as the club’s faculty advisor.

“Students learn the process of negotiation and conflict resolution,” said Lounsbery. “They find the interaction with other students on these issues very valuable.”

Prior to attending the competition, the students are researching and writing about the issues, and learning ways to defend their positions.

“There are numerous ways in which these conferences are beneficial to those who attend,” said Braxton Smallwood, former club president who now serves as the club’s graduate assistant and will participate in the competition.

“It helps with your writing skills in that you are constantly writing things ranging from position papers to draft resolutions,” said Smallwood. “Secondly, it helps to build a better understanding of global politics, and helps to show how other political systems work outside of the United States.”

In addition to the events of the competition, the ECU students have been invited to visit Poland’s embassy during their stay in D.C.

The United Nations Flag (contributed photo)

The United Nations Flag (contributed photo)

“This will be a fantastic way to enhance the educational experience for our group, and it is an overall honor to have been invited,” said Creef.

During the competition, committees and issues to be addressed will include:

  • General Assembly, which will deal with the issues of cybersecurity/cyberwarfare, and small arms trafficking;
  • UN Environmental Assembly, dealing with protection of the environment in areas of armed conflict, and safeguarding the Oceans;
  • UN Conference on Trade and Development, which will examine minimizing the negative impacts of globalization, and the social responsibility of multinational corporations;
  • International Atomic Energy Agency, that will debate nuclear technology and water security, and improving the effectiveness of safeguards and verifications mechanisms; and
  • Office of the High Commissioner for Refugees, to address the needs of the internally displaced, and discuss improving housing and food security for urban refugees.

Dean of the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Dr. William Downs believes participation in academic teams such as Model UN can be an invaluable enhancement of student learning.

“The research students pour into their preparations is considerable and it fosters understanding – even empathy – of the countries they represent. This kind of active learning, with simulations taking place in the heart of the nation’s capital, cannot be matched in a classroom,” said Downs. “Additionally, we’d like nothing more than for ECU’s delegation to outperform those from Brown University, Wake Forest, UC-Irvine, Syracuse and others attending this year’s D.C. competition. That would be quite a statement.”

Immersing an increasing number of ECU students in the world of Washington politics and policy is one of Harriot College’s goals, and National Model UN fits within that goal.

According to Downs, “We are in active discussions with friends and alumni in the D.C. area to build a semester program for ECU students, giving them structured opportunities to take courses and secure internships. Every chance we get to expand our presence in Washington is a positive step toward that aspiration.”

For additional information about the National Model UN conference, visit http://www.nmun.org/conferences/washington-dc.html or contact Lounsbery at 252-328-2349 or olsonlounsberym@ecu.edu. To discuss support of the ECU/Washington D.C. connection, contact Jessica Nottingham, Harriot College director of alumni relations and outreach, at 252-737-1753 or nottinghamj@ecu.edu.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communication 

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