Award-winning Children’s Author & Illustrator Don Tate Visits Greenville

Overnight success does not always happen overnight. In fact, for Don Tate, overnight success took thirty-plus years to attain. This self-described “Longest-coming up-and-

Author-Illustrator Don Tate (www.donate.com); Represented by CarynWiseman, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Photo by Sam Bond Photography)

Author-Illustrator Don Tate (www.dontate.com); Represented by CarynWiseman, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Photo by Sam Bond Photography)

comer” will share his journey from reluctant grade-school reader to published illustrator, and then on to becoming an award-winning children’s book author.

In his presentation on Saturday, March 25, at the Sheppard Memorial Library, Tate will discuss lessons learned, myths vs. reality, and offer practical advice for both aspiring and published authors and illustrators. Don will read and share a few pages from his forthcoming picture book Strong as Sandow: How Eugene Sandow Became the Strongest Man on Earth and highlight his research process.

Mr. Tate is the founding host of The Brown Bookshelf – a blog dedicated to books for African-American young readers, and is the author of award-winning books It Jes’ Happened: When Bill Traylor Started to Draw (2012) and Poet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton (2015).

Mr. Tate’s books will be available for purchase and he will autograph them following his presentation.

This event is free and open to the public. For additional information, contact Dan Zuberbier (252-328-0406).

 

 

-by Dan Zuberbier, Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center

 

Ethnic Studies Film Series screening on March 21

ECU Ethnic Studies, Sociology department, English department, and the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center present: Forbidden; Undocumented and Queer in Rural America by Tiffany Rhyard. The documentary will be shown in Sci-tech 307C on Tuesday, March 21 from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Forbidden is a feature length documentary about an inspiring young man whose story is exceptional, although not unique. Moises is like the thousands of young people growing up in the United States with steadfast dreams but facing overwhelming obstacles.

If you are an undocumented queer immigrant living in the United States amidst this turbulent political climate, you are not safe and your future is at risk. When Moises Serrano was just a baby, his parents risked everything to flee Mexico and make the perilous journey across the desert in search of the American dream. After 23 years growing up in the rural south where he is forbidden to live and love, Moises sees only one option — to fight for justice.

The film chronicles Moises’ work as an activist traveling across his home state of North Carolina as a voice for his community, all while trying to forge a path for his own future.

Both the director, Tiffany Rhynard, and Moises will be attending the screening. There will be a breif Q & A after the film. This event is a Wellness Passport Event!

-by Gera s. Miles Jr., Ethnic Studies

 

ECU’s annual Youth Arts Festival set for March 25

East Carolina University’s annual Youth Arts Festival will be held on the campus mall from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Saturday, March 25.

The event, hosted by the ECU School of Art and Design, is free and open to the public. The festival is geared to elementary and middle school children, but all ages are welcome.

In case of rain, the festival will be held in Jenkins Fine Arts Center on East 5th Street.

A youngster tries on a mask at the 2016 ECU Youth Arts Festival. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

A youngster tries on a mask at the 2016 ECU Youth Arts Festival. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

More than 150 visual and performing artists are expected. Musical, dance and theatrical groups also will perform. Children will have the opportunity to meet artists demonstrating activities such as wheel-thrown ceramics, watercolor painting, weaving, blacksmithing, papermaking, printmaking, sculpture, portraiture and other visual arts.

Children also can create their own artwork with the help of professional artists and ECU art students.

The event is supported by grants from the ECU Office of the Provost, College of Fine Arts and Communication, School of Art and Design, Student Involvement and Leadership, Ledonia Wright Cultural Center, Recreation and Wellness, Uptown Art and Supply, Friends of the ECU School of Art and Design, North Carolina Arts Council, Christy’s Euro Pub and Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge.

For more information, the festival is on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/ECU-Youth-Arts-Festival/145899762138141 or http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cfac/soad/youth-arts.cfm or contact Dindy Reich, coordinator of the Youth Arts Festival, at reichd@ecu.edu or 252-328-5749.

-by Crystal Baity

Campus Recreation & Wellness summer camps

ECU’s Campus Recreation and Wellness (CRW) will begin Summer Camp registration for students, faculty, and staff on Tuesday, March 14th at 8:00 a.m. The CRW offers camps for children ages 5-13, with Rec Junior being ages 5-8 and Recreation Nation being ages 8-13.

Registration details and program information can be accessed by going to our website: www.ecu.edu/crw/summercamps.

For more information please contact Jon Wall at 252-328-1565 or walljo@ecu.edu.

Severe Weather Awareness Week at ECU

As part of Severe Weather Awareness Week, East Carolina University will conduct a test of the ECU Alert emergency notification system at 12 p.m. Friday, March 10.

The test will assess multiple communication systems including the ECU homepage, e-mail, indoor and outdoor loudspeakers, LiveSafe push notifications, VOIP phone (text and voice), text messages, computer pop-up notifications, and messages on digital displays.

People on campus will hear an audible alert on their office telephones and on loudspeakers that will identify this as a test of the ECU Alert emergency notification system. Employees, students and parents will also receive ECU Alert test emails to registered accounts. Digital screens located throughout campus will carry a test message. Users who have registered for ECU Alert cell phone messages will receive a text message.

Campus computer users are reminded that the university has a pop-up notification system, AlertUs, which will fill the computer screen with the ECU Alert message when activated. After the users have read the message, clicking “Acknowledge” will close the warning.

Registration for cell phone messaging is available by selecting the register tab in the purple bar at www.ecu.edu/alertinfo/.

Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to download the free safety app LiveSafe at www.ecu.edu/LiveSafe. LiveSafe allows users to discretely and anonymously report suspicious activity and safety concerns to ECU Police.

Writing workshop highlights veterans’ stories

Former Marine Phil Klay. (contributed photo)

Former Marine Phil Klay. (contributed photo)

Former Marine Phil Klay will be at East Carolina University March 16-17 to participate in the University-sponsored Veterans Writing Workshop, designed to coach and mentor veterans and military-connected writers to record their stories of service.

Klay joined the Marines because we were a nation at war, he says. He wrote short stories about his war, and how that war followed him home, so the American people could better understand the consequences of America’s reactions to the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. There were stories he had to tell — individual stories about men and women that weren’t being told on the nightly news.

Now he’s returning to eastern North Carolina to help other veterans tell their own stories.

Klay will lead a writing workshop March 16 and will be joined by fellow authors Ron Capps, Monica Haller and Dr. Fredrick Foote at Hendrix Theater that evening from 7-9 p.m. for readings and a question-and-answer session, which is open to the public and is an ECU Passport Event.

Author Ron Capps. (contributed photo)

Author Ron Capps. (contributed photo)

“I think the craft of writing is the best way we have of dealing with the most vital, painful and beautiful aspects of life. Hopefully, I’ll have something useful to say to writers who are trying to figure out how to approach subjects that are important to them,” Klay said. “Certainly, I’ve found conversations with veteran writers to be hugely important in helping me to formulate my thoughts.”

Klay won the 2014 National Book Award for Fiction for “Redeployment,” a collection of short stories about the war he witnessed in Iraq during a 2007 troop surge intended push back against a raging insurgency that threatened Iraq’s future.

“It’s such an odd space to be in, transferring being at war in Iraq and at peace the States, between one’s primary sense of oneself as a Marine and as a husband, as a soldier and a citizen,” Klay said. He hopes that his work, and the writing produced by the Veterans Writing Workshop, will extend a bridge to those who didn’t share the experiences of combat.

Klay continues to be affected by his time in Iraq and the continuing legacy of a war well into its second decade. In February 2017, the New York Times published an opinion piece (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/10/opinion/sunday/what-were-fighting-for.html) that commended the moral courage of individual American fighting men and women.

“I think I’ve continued to develop a respect for the depth and complexity of veteran’s experiences. I’ve also thought more about the role of American citizens more broadly, whether veteran or not, and the things that unify us as a country,” Klay said.

Veterans and military-connected writers interested in participating in the Veterans Writing workshop can visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/veteranswritingworkshop/registration.cfm to register.

 

 

-by Benjamin Abel, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

School of Music alumnus wins another Grammy

School of Music alumnus Chris Bullock (BM Performance, Jazz Studies, 2003) won his third Grammy with the multi-genre band Snarky Puppy on February 12, 2017.

This year’s win was for Best Contemporary Instrumental Album, which the band also won in 2016. They won for Best R&B Performance in 2014. A multi-instrumentalist, Bullock performs on saxophone, clarinet, flutes and synths, and has interests in hip-hop and electronic music including deejaying, beat making and production.

Computer Sciences and Business Students Participate in Hackathon

Between 9 p.m. Feb. 23 and 8 a.m. Feb. 24, 16 students from the College of Engineering and Technology (CET), the College of Business (COB) and other University colleges came together to help launch a company.

The College of Business’ Student Technology Center hosted a hackathon where these students created a website, or what they call a web store, for gamers, musicians, writers, artists, etc., to sell their content.

Computer Sciences Senior Patrick Luy, left, works with Samuel Carraway, computer sciences, junior, on a business model canvas during the hackathon. (photos by Michael Rudd)

Computer Sciences Senior Patrick Luy, left, works with Samuel Carraway, computer sciences, junior, on a business model canvas during the hackathon.
(Photos by Michael Rudd)

“I was working on a project in my spare time,” said Samuel Carraway, a CET junior from Chapel Hill. “I wanted to make it a reality.”

Carraway said he participated in two hackathons off campus and that’s where the idea germinated to have a hackathon at the University. He presented the idea to the recently formed student organization, EPIC or Empowering Pioneers through Innovative Culture, which includes students from all over the University who have an entrepreneurial spirit.

To help cultivate that spirit, COB’s Miller School of Entrepreneurship and instructor David Mayo oversaw that hackathon’s proceedings. Though these types of events are usually software intensive, Mayo believes it’s important to have a business component, as well.

“This hackathon not only produced a product, but we also came out with a business model that makes that product useful for the owner and the customer,” said Mayo.  “Entrepreneurship acts as a bridge for that innovation.”

We liked this collaborative atmosphere and having people from different majors and backgrounds come together,” said CET senior and EPIC co-president, Magus Pereira. “The hackathon was a good experience.”

The Feb. 23 & 24 hackathon included students from both the College of Engineering and Technology and the College of Business.

The Feb. 23 & 24 hackathon included students from both the College of Engineering and Technology and the College of Business.

Along with the new web store, a business plan was also finalized to help the store go to market. Teams of engineering and business students focused on three areas: the building of the website, a Kickstarter campaign, and a business model canvas. Business senior Christopher Rudkowski joined the hackathon and was anxious to take what he’s learned and put it to practical use. He said, “I’ve never been so immersed in a situation where we can get together and make something work.”

Business senior Dakota Votaw had never participated in a hackathon, but he’s glad he joined in this one. “It was a very positive experience for everyone,” he said. “I don’t think anyone left there thinking it was a wasted night.”

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, College of Engineering & Technology

ECU students attend 2017 Retail’s BIG Show in NYC

Semi-finalist for the Next Generation Scholarship. (contributed photo)

Semi-finalist for the Next Generation Scholarship. (contributed photo)

National Retail Federation (NRF) provided $6000 in travel scholarships for seven students from the Interior Design and Merchandising department to attend the 2017 Retail’s BIG Show Student Program in New York City, NY January 13-15, 2017. One of the students who attended the Retail Big Show (Matthew Talbot) was among the 25 semi-finalists nationwide for the Next Generation Scholarship https://nrf.com/career-center/scholarships/next-generation-scholarship/next-generation-class-of-2017.   Other students who attended the show are Morgan Price (Next Generation Scholarship), Lindsay Grimmett (NRF Student Ambassador), Sydney Warren (Rising Star), Grace Gemberling, Caroline Pearson, and Rebecca Olsen.

Students from ECU at the 2017 Retail’s BIG show. (contributed photo)

Students from ECU at the 2017 Retail’s BIG show. (contributed photo)

Over 500 students from 70 universities nationwide attended this event. Students got the opportunity to hear industry professionals such as Rebecca Minkoff (Designer), Simon Sinek (Leadership speaker from TED Talks), Karen Katz (CEO of Neiman Marcus), in addition to top industry professionals from Dillard’s, Belk, Disney, Kohl’s, HSN, Walmart, etc. Caroline Pearson received an internship with Belk after the interview and was also contacted by Ross Stores, Inc. for a phone interview, Lindsay Grimmett got an internship offer from HSN and Grace Gemberling is interviewing with Macy’s and Nordstrom for a summer internship. Faculty advisor for the NRF Student chapter is Marina Alexander.

 

 

-by Marina Alexander, Department of Interior Design and Merchandising

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