New offerings, hours from Dining Services

Mackenzie Dolecheck carries her lunch to a seat in the West End Dining Hall.

Mackenzie Dolecheck carries her lunch to a seat in the West End Dining Hall. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

As we begin the new academic year, Dining Services wants to keep you informed about some of the new times, features and offerings that are available to the campus. These offerings will be enhanced in the spring semester, as ECU opens a new Main Campus Student Center where there will be five additional food venues for the campus to enjoy. Watch for updates about the new student center as the semester progresses.

Below is some information about the new and enhanced services and hours of operation for Fall 2018.

 

College Hill

• Todd Dining Hall
The dining hall now opens at 7 a.m., giving students more time before classes. Hours are Monday-Thursday 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Friday 7 a.m.-8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

• Galley
Coming mid-September, the Galley will reopen with enhanced dining options. Stacked, a trendy smash burger concept will make its debut to campus, as well as the Brewhouse by Port City Java, a new late-night coffee, pastry and smoothie spot. Subway and the Pirate Market will open with updates and new convenience items.

• Croatan
The new full-service Chick-fil-A will open Monday, Aug. 27. It will offer fresh market salads, wraps, milkshakes and more, in addition to your favorite chicken sandwiches and nuggets. Our Surprise and Delight Promo this week during lunch has been a crowd pleaser with hungry Pirates stopping in and enjoy some free Chick-fil-A offerings. The Chili’s Too is open from 11 a.m.-9 p.m., serving its famous chicken crispers and quesadillas.

 

West End

• West End Dining Hall
Check out new menu options, like vegan or vegetarian along with made-to-order entrees daily. The dining hall now opens at 7 a.m., giving students more time before classes. Hours are Monday-Thursday 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Friday 7 a.m.-8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

• Reade Street Market/Subway
Open daily at 10:30 a.m., residents in this neighborhood can take full advantage of an expanded selection of meals to go, beverages and quick healthy snacks. Open until 2 a.m., this is the place to go for all your late-night cravings.

• Wright Place

This campus hub is as popular as ever, opening every morning at 7 a.m. and serving Starbucks, Olilo, Burger Studio and Einstein’s. New this year is an expanded selection of fresh sandwiches and Grab n’ Go items which are located beside Einstein’s. Wright Place is open until 7 p.m.

 

Food Trucks

ECU Dining is happy to announce the addition of two local favorites to our food truck family. Villa Verde and Smashed Waffles will be joining our three mobile trucks for lunch starting this week, bringing the campus five food truck options on weekdays from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.! Find Grid Grub and Villa Verde at the Wright Place or look for Street Eats and Smashed Waffles serving it up at Joyner. The Starbucks Truck will be located just south of The Croatan by Brewster until 2 p.m. on class days then will move on up to The Hill by Gateway East and West in the evenings until fall break.

Street Eats and Grid Grub at night – Take advantage of the fall weather and your Purple or Gold Bucks and enjoy dinner at one of our outdoor café tables at Joyner or sit on the mall. Both food trucks serving you Monday-Friday nights from 6 p.m.-midnight.

 

Health Sciences Campus

The Health Sciences Student Center has new hours for the eating venues located in the building. Greens to Go and the Grille Works are open from 10:30 a.m. until 2 p.m., and Starbucks is open from 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. on class days. Stop in for coffee or lunch and enjoy this great facility for students, faculty and staff.

 

Faculty Staff Meal Plans 

All faculty and staff at ECU are eligible to add a Faculty Staff Meal plan to their One Card to make dining in the dining halls easier and eating on campus more affordable. These meal plans allow people to eat 20 meals in the dining halls for the low price of $100 or just $5 per meal. Enjoy Fried Chicken Wednesday, Taco Tuesday or any other meal at your convenience. This plan can be purchased more than once per year and the meals never expire.

 

-Contact: Dining Services, dining@ecu.edu, 252-ECU-FOOD

ECU taps executive director for Innovation and New Ventures

Mark Wdowik has been named the executive director of East Carolina University’s Office of Innovation and New Ventures.

Mark Wdowik has been named the executive director of East Carolina University’s Office of Innovation and New Ventures. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

Mark Wdowik has been named the inaugural executive director for the newly created Office of Innovation and New Ventures at East Carolina University.

Wdowik joins ECU after a national search led by the university’s Division of Research, Economic Development and Engagement.

The Office of Innovation and New Ventures oversees the university’s rapidly expanding efforts to discover, develop and commercialize ideas and inventions cultivated by ECU’s students, faculty and partners.

As the office’s executive director, Wdowik is responsible for leading ECU in its mission to become a national model of how to support student creativity and innovation. This includes growing and maturing the university’s new micro-business program and developing impact investment funds to support innovation and new venture creation at ECU through a philanthropic fund and a potential for a for-profit, equity-based investment fund.

“We want to continue to support a culture of creativity, design, entrepreneurship and innovation at ECU, building upon the great achievements and successes of the Miller School of Entrepreneurship as well as the offices of Community Engagement and Research and Regional Economic Development within REDE,” Wdowik said. “Creating vibrant commercialization and hands-on business development opportunities for students, faculty and partners is an area many universities struggle with. However, that provides ECU a real opportunity to move quickly and excel in this space for the benefit of the people in eastern North Carolina.”

Wdowik is tasked with helping grow the university’s micro-business program. The recently launched program will guide students through four years of entrepreneurship, innovation and business training at ECU, with students creating a business plan before executing their strategy in eastern North Carolina counties during their senior year. The program aims to provide needed services to rural regions, while providing students a systematic, mentor-led commercialization opportunity.

Additionally, Wdowik will explore the potential of an ECU impact investment fund to further support the development and commercialization of ECU’s innovations. Successful investment funds have previously been established at universities throughout the U.S. and abroad, including funds at New York University, the University of California and MIT. In 2016, at least 44 college-focused funds had been established.

“We’re receptive to all new ideas,” Wdowik said. “We’re not here to say ‘No’; we’re here to say ‘Yes, let’s find a way to make it work – whatever the ideas may be.’ That’s the message I want our students, faculty and partners to hear.”

Wdowik joins ECU after a 20-plus-year career in innovation development in higher education. Wdowik has extensive experience with technology transfer, commercialization, economic development, investment funds, industry partnerships, new product development and startups. He also worked in the private sector as the president and CEO of Critical Dimensions Inc., a consulting firm that helped small to large multinational corporations develop business strategies, form strategic partnerships and refine financial strategies.

Wdowik earned both his bachelor’s and master of science degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois. He holds two patents and has most recently served as the chair of the board for the Colorado Venture Capital Authority – managing two $25 million venture capital funds on behalf of the state of Colorado. Likewise, he served as chair of Innosphere – a statewide new business incubator formed in partnership between Colorado State University and the city of Fort Collins.

“As the only university in the state with a medical school, a dental school and a college of engineering, ECU has an unrealized potential to generate intellectual property that can be commercialized,” said Dr. Jay Golden, vice chancellor for REDE. “ECU has taken steps to provide outstanding resources for our students, faculty and partners who are interested in building businesses and helping communities thrive in eastern North Carolina. Mark will continue that trend, while providing even more opportunities for those partnering with ECU to capitalize on their novel ideas.”

Learn more about the Office of New Ventures online at https://rede.ecu.edu/innovation/. Contact Wdowik by email at wdowikm18@ecu.edu or by phone at 252-737-5558.

 

-Contact: Matt Smith, ECU News Services, smithmatt17@ecu.edu

Cool classes: 12 unique courses offered this fall

With classes starting up again this week, here’s a look at some of the coolest courses East Carolina University is offering this fall, with topics ranging from Atlantis to Italian geology. If you’re not a student, these classes will make you wish you were. If you are a student, you might just want to pick up one (or more) of the courses below.

ECU student Grace Ward listens to a lecture during a finance class in the SciTech Building on Jan. 25, 2018.

ECU student Grace Ward listens to a lecture during a finance class on Jan. 25, 2018. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

ANTH 1001: Aliens, Atlantis and Archaeology

Did aliens build the Egyptian pyramids? Does Atlantis really exist? Are mermaids real? This course critically examines some of the extraordinary theories concerning archaeological sites and artifacts. Students will learn how to assess claims about the past and gain appreciation of its many different reconstructions, though not all equally plausible.

MERCH 3003: Athleisure Wear

Leggings and Lycra aren’t just for the gym anymore. Activewear or athleisure – casual clothes that can be worn both for exercise and general use – has become a popular trend with global sales expected to top $350 billion in 2020. In this class, students will learn about the markets for athleisure and the merchandising strategies that have turned activewear into a lifestyle shift.

FINA 1904: Personal Finance

ECU’s wildly popular personal finance class combines practical money-saving tips and entertaining lessons to teach students how to be savvy spenders. Taught by Mark Weitzel and Len Rhodes, this class attracts 500 students per semester. Weitzel and Rhodes challenge students to save $100,000 collectively each semester by utilizing the tips they teach, a challenge the students have met for the past 10 years.

Len Rhodes co-teaches the personal finance class with Mark Weitzel. They engage students by making the subject fun and memorable.

Len Rhodes co-teaches the personal finance class with Mark Weitzel. They engage students by making the subject fun and memorable. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

GEOL 1500: Dynamic Earth

It’s one thing to study geology in your own backyard. It’s another thing entirely to study geology in the shadow of Italy’s volcano, Mt. Vesuvius. This course covers the same basics of geology covered in classes on ECU’s main campus, but adapted for ECU Tuscany, the university’s year-round study abroad program in Italy. Students take field trips to the Amalfi Coast and Cinque Terre, where they get to see coastal processes take place on beaches and cliff sides, and to Pompeii, where they see the remnants of a city buried under volcanic ash. Rocks just got a whole lot more interesting.

Students taking GEOL 1500 study the Italian coastline as part of the ECU Tuscany program..

Students taking GEOL 1500 study the Italian coastline as part of the ECU Tuscany program. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

LING 2720: Invented Languages

In this course, students learn about invented languages such as Klingon and Elvish and are guided in creating their own invented language. The language will be built up incrementally over the course of the semester, starting with individual sounds and ending with brief conversations. Throughout the course, students learn about the features that human languages have and share. In other words, time to brush up on your Dothraki.

POLS 3037: Campaigns and Elections

Only offered during presidential and midterm election years, this course examines the key issues, questions and controversies that surround the study of campaigns and elections in the United States. The midterm elections in November will be enormously important –deciding whether Democrats can gain control of Congress or if Republicans will keep their hold on the legislative branch – giving students plenty to discuss.

HIST 6850 – Field Research in Maritime History

There’s something undeniably right about ECU Pirates working on various shipwreck sites. Past maritime studies students have explored shipwrecks in the Outer Banks, Bermuda and Saipan, uncovering artifacts and piecing together various mysteries at sea.

ECU maritime studies professor Bradley Rodgers and a team of students mounted the first scientific exploration of an unidentified shipwreck site in Bermuda.

ECU maritime studies professor Bradley Rodgers and a team of students mounted the first scientific exploration of an unidentified shipwreck site in Bermuda. (Photo contributed by the National Museum of Bermuda)

ENGL 2570: The Supernatural

Ever heard of the graveyard under Curry Court or the ghost of Cotten Hall? This folklore class explores supernatural narratives and campus lore. Students in the course organize a ghost walk on campus.

HIST 3635: Samurai History and Cinema

This course title (and coolness) is self-explanatory, but let us elaborate. Students study the samurai as a warrior elite in Japanese history and, most especially, film representations of the samurai and Japanese history. In addition to developing a critical perspective on claims about the samurai, the course provides a good introduction to the larger field of Japanese history from ancient times to the present.

HNRS 2013: Becoming Tomorrow’s Leader

Taught by former ECU chancellor Steve Ballard, this honors course is a practical guide to leadership that will teach students the skills to make a positive difference. Emphasis will be placed on understanding leadership’s joys, challenges and landmines as well as determining what kind of leader a student wishes to be. Students will learn vital lessons from great leaders and improve their own capacity to lead.

KINE 1010: Fitness Walking

New studies show there can be substantial health benefits to using a pet to be more active.

The Department of Kinesiology is ahead of the curve with its fitness walking class. For the past five years, it has partnered with the Pitt County Animal Shelter to have students walk shelter dogs for class credit. Cute dogs + exercise = win-win.

ECU freshmen Alexis Parker, left, and Kristen Lovick pet Duke as they relax on campus. Lovick and Parker exercise and play with dogs available for adoption at the local animal shelter..

ECU freshmen Alexis Parker, left, and Kristen Lovick pet Duke as they relax on campus. Lovick and Parker exercise and play with dogs available for adoption at the local animal shelter. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

COAS 2150 – Boating Skills and Seamanship

Small boat safety and seamanship skills are at the center of this class, where students can truly feel like pirates on the open seas. Landlubbers need not register, matey.

 

 

-by Erin Shaw, University Communications

Growth leads to parking challenges on campus

Watching the construction on and around East Carolina University’s campuses and seeing Greenville’s downtown area vibrant with new businesses is a sign of positive growth.

That growth has made parking and traveling around ECU more challenging. But a little planning will help make the experience smooth and safe.

ECU Transit provides more than 3 million rides each year to locations on and off campus. There are two apps students are requested to download, Nextbus and TransLoc. Nextbus provides real-time arrival predictions and rider alerts for students utilizing ECU buses, and TransLoc is used to schedule a SafeRide through ECU Transit. Students can always call 252-328-7433 to schedule a SafeRide.

Passengers board an ECU bus during new student orientation in June.

Passengers board an ECU bus during new student orientation in June. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

On main campus, students will notice that the Mendenhall/West End bus terminal is closed until summer of 2019 due to the extensive renovations taking place at nearby Greene Residence Hall. Those routes have moved to the new Main Campus Student Center bus terminal.

This summer, ECU Parking & Transportation adjusted parking on the Health Sciences campus to provide better access to the new Health Sciences Campus Student Center. Pay station parking provides students with greater flexibility if they are primarily in off-campus clinics and only visit campus a few times a semester. This is a less costly option than purchasing a full-year permit.

Additionally, the B4 student lots have been consolidated to make finding locations on campus easier.

“We did reduce the number of B4 permits to accommodate these changes, but that decision was based on lot usage data we collect throughout the year,” said Bill Koch, associate vice chancellor for Environmental Health and Campus Safety. “Significant changes in parking accommodations go through the university’s Parking & Transportation Committee that includes faculty, staff and student representatives.”

Students board an ECU bus during Pirates Aboard-Admitted Student Day.

Students board an ECU bus during Admitted Student Day.

Other parking zone designations were changed this summer on main campus. Officials stress the importance of checking the parking zone signs and which permits are valid at a given time. Some parking zones will allow additional permits in the evenings, most beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Commuter students who need parking in the evenings or on weekends may want to consider the new C2A permit. This gives them access to areas on main campus and the ability to park closer to some Health Sciences Campus facilities after 5:30 p.m.

Additional information to note:

  • Pay attention to signs. Parking lot zones have changed since last semester.
  • Purchase your parking permit as soon as possible to avoid tickets.
  • Register all vehicles that will use a parking permit.
  • Turning on your hazard lights does not allow you to park closer.
  • Pirate Express routes will serve the downtown area on Friday and Saturday nights. The Thursday night service was discontinued due to low ridership.

2018 Parking Zone Changes

 

-by Jamie Smith, ECU News Services

Biology professor receives Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences’ top honor

Dr. Baohong Zhang, professor of biology, is the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences 20th Distinguished Professor.

Dr. Baohong Zhang, professor of biology, is the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences 20th Distinguished Professor.
(Photo by Doug Boyd)

Dr. Baohong Zhang, East Carolina University professor of biology, was named Distinguished Professor at the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences 55th annual convocation on Aug. 17. Zhang is the 20th member of the faculty to be honored with the title.

“This is a wonderful surprise to me,” said Zhang. “There are so many great colleagues and professors in THCAS, and I feel lucky, grateful and humbled to be the recipient of this prestigious award. This award will encourage me to achieve more in the future – towards excellence in research, student success and contribution to ECU’s mission and internationalization.”

The THCAS Distinguished Professorship is the highest honor within the college and is conferred upon a professor whose career exemplifies a commitment to and a love for knowledge and academic life, as demonstrated by outstanding teaching and advising, research and creative productivity, and professional service.

“Baohong Zhang is a remarkable scholar and academician who has established a record that by itself would constitute an exemplary career. He has risen to these heights of achievement from modest rural beginnings, in a second language and as an immigrant – a truly inspiring Pirate story,” said Dr. Jeffrey McKinnon, former chair of the Department of Biology.

Zhang (right) gives a tour of the ECU biology greenhouse and discusses his research with a representative from a funding agent.

Zhang (right) gives a tour of the ECU biology greenhouse and discusses his research with a representative from a funding agent. (Contributed photo)

While at ECU, Zhang has displayed the qualities and characteristics required of a Distinguished Professor.

In his role as professor, Zhang has taught courses in plant biology, biotechnology and molecular biology. He has secured grants to support undergraduate and graduate students in study abroad courses in China. In addition to his courses taught, Zhang has served as a mentor to 14 post doctoral scholars and 17 doctoral and master’s degree students, as a member on 44 graduate student committees, and as a mentor to more than 32 undergraduate researchers and 241 undergraduate advisees.

Zhang’s research interests include microRNA, gene regulation, molecular genetics and toxicology, genome editing and biotechnology. He has been recognized locally and nationally for his research and creative activity in the areas of computational and molecular biology, particularly in the role of miRNA – a small non-coding RNA molecule that regulates the activity of genes by silencing RNA after it is transcribed from DNA – during cotton fiber development and in plant responses to environmental stress. In addition, he has conducted studies on the role of miRNA in cancer, and he has conducted research in the area of head trauma.

Dr. Baohong Zhang and Dr. Xiaoping Pan (right) are pictured here with ECU students at Anyang Institute of Technology during their 2018 study abroad research trip to China.

Zhang and Dr. Xiaoping Pan (right) are pictured here with ECU students at Anyang Institute of Technology during their 2018 study abroad research trip to China. (Contributed photo)

Over the course of his career, Zhang has authored more than 200 journal articles, nine books and 14 book chapters in his areas of research. He has presented at more than 50 conferences, and he has secured more than $2.4 million in research funding as the principal investigator or co-PI on 35 projects.

Since joining ECU in 2007, Zhang has chaired three biology departmental committees – greenhouse, seminar series and personnel committee – and served as a committee member on several faculty searches. In his other professional activities, he has served as an editor, associate editor, editorial board member or guest editor for nearly two dozen journals, and he has served as an ad-hoc reviewer for more than 90 journals and 35 funding agencies.

He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; Sigma Xi, scientific research society; Association of Southeastern Biologists; the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry; American Chemical Society; and the American Society of Plant Biologists.

Zhang at work in his research lab.

Zhang at work in his research lab. (Contributed photo)

In addition to the THCAS Distinguished Professorship, Zhang has received many awards, including, in 2013, ECU’s Five Year Research Achievement Award, and in 2017, the inaugural ECU Achievement in International Research and Creative Activity Award. In 2018, he received the Cotton Researcher of the Year award given by the International Cotton Advisory Committee. The annual award is presented to only one person worldwide who has raised the international importance of research in the cotton industry.

“I can think of no one better qualified for the Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professorship,” wrote one of Zhang’s colleagues in a letter of nomination.

Another colleague concluded, “I have known virtually all previous THCAS Distinguished Professors. We should be proud to consider professor Baohong Zhang as one of their peers.”

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

National Maritime History Society to honor ECU professor emeritus

Dr. Timothy J. Runyan, East Carolina University professor emeritus of maritime studies and Honors College faculty fellow, will be honored this fall by the National Maritime Historical Society. Runyan will receive the David A. O’Neil Sheet Anchor Award at the New York Yacht Club on Oct. 25.

Dr. Timothy J. Runyan, pictured on the deck of the 1607 replica vessel Godspeed in Jamestown, Va, where he spoke at the launch of the vessel.

Dr. Timothy J. Runyan, pictured on the deck of the 1607 replica vessel Godspeed in Jamestown, Va, where he spoke at the launch of the vessel. (Contributed photos)

“I am very flattered; so very surprised to learn that I was selected for this prestigious award,” said Runyan.

The award honors Runyan’s years of dedicated service as a trustee for the National Maritime Historical Society and for his advocacy of maritime heritage preservation in the United States.

“Dr. Runyan is being recognized for his extraordinary leadership in building the strength and outreach of the society,” wrote Wendy Paggiotta, vice president of the NMHS.

As a trustee for the NMHS, Runyan serves as a member of the executive committee, chair of the advocacy committee and chairman of the editorial advisory board of Sea History magazine.

Since 2015, his advocacy with the U.S. Congress has resulted in nearly $10 million in federal funding for a grant program in maritime heritage. More than 100 organizations have received awards through the program, including a $200,000 grant to the Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington, a $46,000 grant to the Core Sound and Waterfowl Museum on Harker’s Island and a $144,500 grant, awarded in 2016, to ECU’s Queen Anne’s Revenge Conservation Laboratory.

Runyan aboard a sailboat in Annapolis, Md.

Runyan aboard a sailboat in Annapolis, Md.

“Every organization that has received a National Maritime Heritage Grant has Dr. Runyan to thank, as he spearheaded the effort to restore funding for the grants program in his role as chair of the National Maritime Alliance,” wrote Paggiotta.

During his 23-year career at ECU, Runyan served as director of the master’s program in Maritime History and Underwater Archaeology, later renamed the Program in Maritime Studies. He served as acting director, and later, director of the program, was a senior research associate to the vice chancellor for research and graduate studies, and a faculty member of the ECU Institute for Coastal Science and Policy.

Runyan received his doctorate from the University of Maryland and studied at the University of London. Additional faculty appointments included Cleveland State University and Oberlin College. From 2007 to 2011, he was invited to serve as acting manager of the Maritime Heritage Program at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries — the largest maritime heritage program in the federal government – before returning to ECU as a faculty member in the newly established Honors College.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

Summer athletic camps showcase ECU

Hundreds of area school-age children took part in various summer athletic camps at East Carolina University this year. The camps ranged from volleyball to football and all points in-between.

The camps gave the young athletes, from grade school to high school, a chance to interact with ECU coaches and players and learn the Pirate way. They also learned different training techniques and proper form. Some of the kids who took part may one day end up playing for the purple and gold, so getting them on the field, court or diamond is a great way to showcase what ECU has to offer.

 

-by Rich Klindworth, ECU News Services

ECU Alert tests on Aug. 15, 16 and 17

East Carolina University will conduct tests of the ECU Alert emergency notification system Aug. 15 (noon), 16 (noon) and 17 (2 p.m.). 

The tests will assess multiple communication systems including the ECU homepage, email, indoor and outdoor loudspeakers, VOIP phone text and voice, SMS text messages, desktop pop-up notifications, and messages on digital signs. On Wednesday and Thursday, portions of the system will be tested, but not text messaging. All aspects of the ECU Alert system will be tested at 2 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17.

People on campus will hear a voice message on their office telephones and on loudspeakers that will identify this as a test of the ECU Alert emergency notification system. Employees, students and parents will also receive ECU Alert test emails to registered accounts. Digital screens located throughout campus will carry a test message. Users who have registered for ECU Alert cell phone messages will receive one SMS text message on Friday at 2 p.m.

Campus computer users are reminded that the university has a pop-up notification system, AlertUs, which will fill the computer screen with the ECU Alert message when activated. After the users have read the message, clicking “Acknowledge” will close the warning.

Registration for cell phone messaging is available by selecting the register tab at alertinfo.ecu.edu

Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to download the free safety app LiveSafe at ecu.edu/LiveSafe. LiveSafe allows users to discretely and anonymously report suspicious activity and safety concerns to ECU Police.

 

Driving in style: Alumni association promotes Pirate plates

The East Carolina Alumni Association is part of a renewed push to get more drivers showing their Pirate pride with ECU-branded license plates.

The program, an existing partnership with the university and the North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicles, returns a portion of license plate fees back to ECU and supports student scholarships.

PeeDee shows off a Pirate plate on campus.

PeeDee shows off a Pirate plate on campus. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

“This partnership makes total sense for us,” said Heath Bowman, associate vice chancellor for alumni relations. “A vast majority of our ECU alumni and friends live in North Carolina, so we were excited when this opportunity came about. We want to challenge all Pirates around the state to upgrade their vehicles with a Pirate plate. It is a great way to not only support our deserving students, but to help showcase the strength and generosity of Pirate Nation around our state.”

The specialized ECU license plate with the Pirate logo costs an additional $25 on top of the regular DMV registration fee. Of that amount, $15 goes to the ECU Alumni Scholarship Fund. For an additional $30, the Pirate plate can be personalized with a custom message such as a class year.

Options available for Pirates at the DMV.

Options available for Pirates at the DMV. (Photos by the ECU Alumni Association)

To order a Pirate license plate, go to the nearest DMV office or visit the DMV online. For more information, visit piratealumni.com.

Only Pirate plates purchased in North Carolina support ECU scholarships. Various states offer collegiate license plates, and those interested in an out-of-state Pirate license plate should check with their local DMV.

 

-by Erin Shaw, University Communications

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