Joyner Library announces exhibition winners

East Carolina University’s Joyner Library has announced the winners of its ninth annual Graduate Student Art and Design Exhibition. Winners were selected from 43 artworks by 20 artists that have been on display since the exhibition’s Oct. 20 opening.

“Jamal Roberts,” by Andrew Wells, graphite and acrylic

“Jamal Roberts,” by Andrew Wells, graphite and acrylic

Winning the Friends of Joyner Library Purchase Award — the competition’s marquee award that comes with a $1,000 prize — was Andrew Wells for his graphite and acrylic painting “Jamal Roberts.”

“When I first saw ‘Jamal Roberts,’ I was struck by its power and relevance,” said Joyner Library Director Jan Lewis, who selected the winner. “In a world where people are too often judged and categorized based on external or superficial characteristics, Andrew Wells reminds us of the pain this causes. Unfortunately, ‘Jamal Roberts’ was as relevant 30 years ago as it is today; I can only hope that 30 years from now, as part of Joyner Library’s permanent art collection, it will be viewed in a historical context, not as a still-current depiction of society.”

Other award winners were:

  • Hosanna Rubio received the College of Fine Arts and Communication’s $500 Dean’s Merit Award for the enamel and metal series “1st Timothy 2:12, Deuteronomy 23.2 and Judges 21:2”
  • Addison Brown, winner of the School of Art and Design’s $350 Director’s Award for the photograph on aluminum “Interrogation”
  • Alex Ingle, winner of the School of Art and Design’s $250 Award for the ceramic sculpture Happy Valentine’s Day
  • Chris Morgan, winner of the Dowdy Student Store’s $50 Award for the bronze sculpture Breaking Free into Subconsciousness

 

Juror Matt Amante, Pitt Community College art instructor, complimented the diversity and strength of the entries.

“Interrogation,” by Addison Brown, photograph on aluminum

“Interrogation,” by Addison Brown, photograph on aluminum

“I am happy with what I selected and feel that they are very deserving of the awards, but I had to almost constantly second-guess myself,” he said. “I appreciated the fact that nearly all of the work forced me to want to spend more time with it and consider it.”

The competition is a collaboration between Joyner Library and the School of Art and Design to showcase some of the best work of the year by art and design students.

“The exhibition provides an opportunity to recognize the artists as well as the faculty from whom they learned. We are thrilled to share their creations with the university community through this annual exhibition,” Lewis said.

The exhibition is on display until Jan. 10 in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the second floor of Joyner Library.
–by Jules Norwood

Chicago Cubs head athletic trainer and ECU alum reflects on career

As head athletic trainer for the 2016 World Series Champion Chicago Cubs, East Carolina University alumnus PJ Mainville ’97 recommends that students understand the value of service.

“I am always looking for something new or different to help the players,” Mainville said. “Athletic training is a perfect blend of athletics and the medical field.”

In his fifth season with the Cubs, Mainville is responsible for the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of sports injuries for the team, where he oversees 23 staff members in athletic training and strength and conditioning. He said establishing relationships with his team and players is the best part of his job.

Chicago Cubs head athletic trainer examines a baseball player’s elbow. (Photo by David Durochik)

Chicago Cubs head athletic trainer examines a baseball player’s elbow. (Photo by David Durochik)

The Warrenton, Virginia native wanted to attend college out of state and said his visit to ECU sold him. “The people were welcoming and I settled into the community well,” Mainville said.

Head athletic trainer for the Chicago Cubs holds the 2016 World Series Trophy. (Contributed photo)

Head athletic trainer for the Chicago Cubs holds the 2016 World Series Trophy. (Contributed photo)

Although the athletic training degree had not been established, the curriculum to prepare students for the Board of Certification exam to become nationally certified was offered through the exercise and sport science degree, which is the path Mainville chose.

“The expectations of the curriculum that Dr. Katie Flanagan developed helped prepare students for the real world,” he said.

Now that Mainville has reached his goal of being a head athletic trainer, he said his perspective has changed. And he eventually wants to teach in a university setting once his time is finished in baseball.

“I am helping to prepare those under me to take my job one day,” he said.

Mainville worked more than 13 years in the minor leagues with the Baltimore Orioles and Arizona Diamondbacks while entering his seventh season in major league baseball.  He earned a master’s degree in 2005 in performance enhancement from California University of Pennsylvania.

 

–Kathy Muse

ECU removes hurdles for distance education students outside NC

East Carolina University, a leader in distance education, has made it easier for out-of-state students to take on-line classes at ECU.

In November, ECU was approved to participate in the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (NC-SARA) which removes many of the barriers associated with enrolling in distance education classes across state lines. Institutions that are members of SARA can provide online education to students from all 44 SARA member states.

“NC-SARA opens the doors of enrollment for students throughout the United States while ensuring they are being provided clear and consistent means of raising issues,” said Charlene Lee, ECU’s state authorization compliance specialist.

According to Lee, students living in SARA states can immediately access all of ECU’s online programs and complete face-to-face and online experiential learning activities which include clinicals, internships and practicums.

“This is an essential authorization in providing ECU’s educational services nationally. When coupled with appropriate marketing we will be in an excellent position to expand offerings and once discovered, I believe our programs will become very popular from Maine to California,” said ECU Provost Dr. Ron Mitchelson.

ECU had to meet up to 50 different state licensure requirements and comply with the professional licensure agencies in each state before joining NC-SARA.

“As a result of our approval to become a NC-SARA institutional participant, students can enroll in our online programs with confidence knowing that we are ensuring access to quality educational offerings regardless of their location.”  Said Dr. Elmer Poe, with ECU’s State Authorization Compliance office.

Poe added that NC-SARA provides nationally recognized guidelines to help ECU evaluate its distance education offerings and ensure that best practices are being followed.

NC-SARA is a voluntary, regional approach to oversight of postsecondary distance education. States and institutions that choose to become members operate under NC-SARA policies and standards that are overseen by the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements and administered by four regional higher education compacts. ECU is a member of the Southern Regional Education board compact.

According to Marshall Hill, executive director of NC-SARA, the initiative is increasing administrative efficiency and lowering the costs of obtaining authorization to provide distance education in states that join.

Hill noted that SARA institutions must annually commit to several steps designed to ensure that courses and programs provide high-quality learning opportunities that can help students reach their goals.

For more information, visit http://nc-sara.org/sara-states-institutions.
–Jamie Smith

ECU team competes in national robotics competition

East Carolina University’s Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering robotics team took third place at the national ATMAE Conference held Nov. 2-5 in Orlando, Florida.

Led by Zack Cleghorn, an industrial engineering technology student, the team worked from August until October on the ECU robot. Other team members were David Palmieri, Oliver Chen, Cameron Coleman, Chance Smitherman, Luke Pearson, Kyle Marchand, Samuel Saunders and Josh Stevens.

Front row (left to right): David Palmieri, Oliver Chen, Cameron Coleman, Chance Smitherman, Zack Cleghorn. Back row : Luke Pearson, Kyle Marchland, Samuel Saunders, Josh Stevens. (Contributed photo)

Front row (left to right): David Palmieri, Oliver Chen, Cameron Coleman, Chance Smitherman, Zack Cleghorn. Back row: Luke Pearson, Kyle Marchand, Samuel Saunders, Josh Stevens. (Contributed photo)

Faculty members Amy Frank, teaching instructor in technology systems, and Dr. Jimmy Linn, teaching assistant professor, accompanied the team made up of industrial engineering technology, computer science and technology management graduate students. It was the first time many of the students had worked on a project requiring extensive wiring, programming and design decisions.

Team members from a competing team examine the ECU robot on display.

Team members from a competing team examine the ECU robot on display.

The robot had to complete two major circuits at the competition. The first consisted of a burlap bridge, a teeter totter and an automation segment where the robot had to collect five cubes and store them. The second circuit was a relay race in which the robot had to sprint down and collect irregular shaped blocks and return to the starting point. During the competition, the robot experienced a few minor automation failures over the burlap bridge, but was able to complete the teeter totter successfully for both passes.

One of the best features of the robot was its secondary inner wheels, which were 3D printed by Stevens. The wheels were adapted using riveted spokes to help pull the robot over the burlap bridge. With several infra-red sensors, an ultrasonic sensor and an Xbox controller, the robot sprang to life for the automation segment.

A close-up of the finished ECU robot. Several parts were made using a 3D printer.

A close-up of the finished ECU robot. Several parts were made using a 3D printer.

With an aluminum frame, the robot only weighed 25 pounds.

For more information on ATMAE and the robotics team, contact Frank (franka@ecu.edu) or Linn (linnj@ecu.edu) in the Department of Technology Systems.
-by Chance Smitherman, ECU robotics team member

ECU senior receives community impact award

East Carolina University senior Lekisha Pittman was recognized for outstanding leadership and service by North Carolina Campus Compact, a statewide network of colleges and universities with a commitment to civic engagement. Pittman is a recipient of the network’s Community Impact Award, honoring one student leader at each member school.

ECU Senior receives Community Impact Award

ECU senior Lakisha Pittman received the Campus Compact’s Community Impact Award (Contributed photo)

Pittman is a family and community services major from High Point and is a founding member of the ECU Campus Kitchens Project (CKECU) Nutrition Outreach program. She helps lead four nutrition lessons and provides healthy snacks to 40 children each month. Pittman said she does not take what she does on campus or in the community lightly.

“I appreciate that someone else is looking on to what I am doing and I hope that someone is watching me and inspired to do something to make an impact as well,” said Pittman.

Her commitment to nurturing healthy bodies and minds through service has led to more students becoming engaged, growing the nutrition outreach program from one student leader last year to 13 active members and numerous one-time volunteers today. Pittman spends 25 hours a week as an intern with CKECU, conducts research on food insecurity among local senior citizens, and is working with other students to start an on-campus food pantry.

Pittman was honored at the Compact’s annual CSNAP student conference on Nov. 12 at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Students and staff from 24 campuses participated in networking opportunities and student-led workshops on diverse community engagement topics and a showcase of organizations working for social change, including the Campus Kitchens Project.

As one of 25 students selected by their campus for the 2016 honor, Pittman joins more than 200 college students recognized by the network since the award was first presented in 2006.

North Carolina Campus Compact is a statewide coalition of 36 public and private community colleges and universities. The network was founded in 2002 and is hosted by Elon University. North Carolina Campus Compact is an affiliate of the national Campus Compact organization, which claims 1,000 member schools representing nearly 2 million college students.
–Jamie Smith

ECU honors graduating veterans

East Carolina University held a ceremony and reception on Nov. 28 to recognize its graduating student veterans, who received red, white and blue tassels and gold challenge coins to commemorate the occasion.

Cords and Pins: ECU’s graduating student veterans received red, white and blue tassels and challenge coins during a recognition ceremony Nov. 28. (Photos by Chris Stansbury)

Cords and Pins: ECU’s graduating student veterans received red, white and blue tassels and challenge coins during a recognition ceremony Nov. 28. (Photos by Chris Stansbury)

First held last fall, the event is organized each semester by Student Veteran Services in the Division of Student Affairs. About 25 students and family members attended this fall’s ceremony.

Chancellor Staton with Keyvin Dixon

Chancellor Staton with Keyvin Dixon

ECU strives to be a military friendly university and is the only school in the UNC System with a veteran success counselor physically housed on campus, helping student veterans and their families navigate their educational careers.

At the recognition ceremony, Chancellor Cecil Staton spoke to the student veterans and their families, as well as faculty and staff in attendance in the Spilman Gallery.

“I commend each one of you for your service to our great country and further applaud your commitment to successfully completing your education,” he said. “Each of you has achieved so much to get to where you are today, and now we look forward to you becoming amazing ambassadors for East Carolina University.”

There are about 500 student veterans currently enrolled at ECU, and 66 are graduating this fall. One of them, Ashley Bonner, shared her personal story with those in attendance.

Chancellor Staton with Taylohr Richardson

Chancellor Staton with Taylohr Richardson

She explained how her three deployments impacted her physically and emotionally and that she struggled to return to a sense of normalcy.  Ashley began working with therapy horses at the Rocking Horse Ranch in Greenville. She said one horse in particular, named Cisco, changed her life.

“I worked very closely with Cisco and taught him a lot, but he taught me even more,” Bonner said. “I learned to trust in myself, have confidence in myself and that I could survive and succeed in my life after taking off my uniform.

“My university, East Carolina University, also gave me opportunities to grow and succeed. The university studies degree with a focus on rehabilitation will open doors that I hope will let me help other veterans making a life transition.”

 

Chancellor Staton with Shante Boseman

Chancellor Staton with Shante Boseman

–Jules Norwood

Season of giving benefits ECU students

Giving Tuesday continues to bring out the generosity of the Pirate Nation. The 2016 day to donate to educational and non-profit organizations brought in $136,736 to East Carolina University. In the three years that ECU has been participating in Giving Tuesday, the university has raised $463,279.

Giving Tuesday 2016
“Thank you Pirate Nation, your generosity is very much appreciated,” said Chris Dyba, vice chancellor for university advancement. “Your donations are an investment in what we are doing here at ECU with our vision to enhance student success, serve the public and transform the region.”

The support for Giving Tuesday came from all across the country, with people donating in amounts ranging from $10 to more than $30,000. There were 24 states represented — North Carolina residents donated the majority with California coming in second. The gifts were spread throughout the university with Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences receiving the largest portion at $47,341. Rounding out the top five supported programs were the Honors College, College of Business, Pirate Club and School of Dental Medicine.

“With these gifts, we will move closer to achieving one of our major goals — doubling the number of students who study abroad each year,” said Dr. William Downs, dean of Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences. “We firmly believe that ECU students should graduate with more global competence and more global competitiveness than ever before, and scholarship dollars are essential to making this ambition a reality.”

Cupola

On top of that, Downs said the funding by alumni and friends helped sustain the Voyages of Discovery, which has brought more than 24,000 students, faculty and community members to campus to hear from the world’s foremost authorities in the sciences, the arts and the humanities.

Glenn Woodard is a 1958 graduate of ECU and is a member of the advancement council for Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences. He was one of the 170 people who donated to the university on Giving Tuesday. He said he donated to Voyages of Discovery because he loves ECU and credits it for making him who he is today.

“I think ECU is a terrific asset for eastern North Carolina. It has a great reputation for service and has produced dynamic graduates,” Woodard added.

“People might not realize how important these donations are day to day. With the money being allocated to priority funds, those dollars make a direct impact on specific program budgets. This funding will enhance our students’ education as well as our faculty’s access to technology,” Dyba said.

Following Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday, Giving Tuesday has become a new tradition for people to give back in the form of charitable gifts in the beginning of the holiday shopping season. If you would like to donate to East Carolina University or for more information, visit  http://www.ecu.edu/give/.
–Rich Klindworth

Laupus Library celebrates scholarship in health sciences

Faculty and staff from across East Carolina University’s Division of Health Sciences recently gathered for an annual celebration of research and scholarship.

Dr. Leigh Cellucci, professor in Health Services & Information Management, receives the Laupus Bronze for authoring a book this year. (Photo by Kelly Dilda)

Dr. Leigh Cellucci, professor in Health Services & Information Management, receives the Laupus Bronze for authoring a book this year. (Photos by Kelly Dilda)

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library held its 11th Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards at the Hilton Greenville on Nov. 15, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library. Laupus is “proud to be a partner in the research and publication process,” noted Elizabeth Ketterman, interim director.

“It is inspiring to see the breadth of research that occurs in the division over a year’s time,” she added.

There were 114 authors honored this year, who contributed to nearly 375 journal articles, book chapters, books and other creative works between July 2015 and June 2016.

Book author Dr. Laura Gantt, associate dean for nursing support services, is congratulated by Vice Chancellor Phyllis Horns.

Book author Dr. Laura Gantt, associate dean for nursing support services, is congratulated by Vice Chancellor Phyllis Horns.

“Every year we do this we have a longer and longer list of faculty and staff who are fully engaged in the work of the university,” remarked Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor for health sciences.

Dr. Nicholas Benson, interim dean of the Brody School of Medicine, applauded authors’ “effort to share your knowledge and generate wisdom…to make a real difference in the wellness of eastern North Carolina, from Murphy to Manteo, and across the nation and world.”

It was College of Allied Health Sciences Dean Dr. Robert Orlikoff’s first appearance at the event, having arrived at East Carolina this fall from a prior leadership post at West Virginia University.

“The reason that ECU exists is for our students…and how our students represent the future,” he said. “But this event focuses attention on our talented faculty who make all of that (learning) possible. Their scholarship is directly tied to the student experience, and advancing health care and transforming the region.”

Authors from Laupus, the ECU College of Nursing and the School of Dental Medicine were also recognized.

Registration for the 2016-17 author event will begin in February. More information about the annual awards ceremony – including a complete listing of this year’s published authors – is available online at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/HSAR/.

Dr. R. Todd Watkins and Dr. Geralyn Crain, both faculty in ECU's School of Dental Medicine, enjoy this year’s Author Recognition Awards Ceremony. (Photo by Peggy Novotny)

Dr. R. Todd Watkins and Dr. Geralyn Crain, both faculty in ECU’s School of Dental Medicine, enjoy this year’s Author Recognition Awards Ceremony. (Photo by Peggy Novotny)

 

–Kathryn Kennedy

Turkeypalooza event making a difference for local families

The Campus Kitchen at East Carolina University is making a difference for local families at Thanksgiving.

Since 2013, Campus Kitchen has sponsored Turkeypalooza to provide a traditional Thanksgiving meal for area families.

The Campus Kitchen at East Carolina University is making a difference for local families in need of a Thanksgiving meal. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

The Campus Kitchen at East Carolina University is making a difference for local families in need of a Thanksgiving meal. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

In total, 26 departments, schools, colleges or organizations on campus provided donations for 40 families. Sponsorship included $25 for a turkey as well as creating a box of meal supplies, including stuffing, gravy, vegetables and dessert items.

“Our goal is to help 40 families have a Thanksgiving meal this year, and the families were chosen with the help of our community partners,” said Lekisha Pittman, event manager for Turkeypalooza.

The community partners for this year’s Turkeypalooza include Operation Sunshine, the Little Willie Center, the JOY Soup Kitchen and the Ronald McDonald House of Eastern N.C.

“The ECU Campus Kitchen selected 20 Little Willie Center families to provide for this Thanksgiving,” said Melissa L. Arrington, program volunteer coordinator for the Little Willie Center. “The need for this project is extremely great. Recently, Hurricane Matthew affected our state, leaving many families displaced from their homes. Now, everyone is seeking help to get back on their feet. This is a blessing and a great start.”

The Campus Kitchen at East Carolina University is making a difference for local families in need of a Thanksgiving meal. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Nationwide, the Campus Kitchen Project includes more than 55 high school and college campuses that participate in Turkeypalooza each year. ECU’s group will deliver meals this week, while other campuses will host a meal on Thanksgiving Day.


–Sophronia Knott

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