Symposium builds connections

Nearly 80 East Carolina University faculty members filled Harvey Hall at the Murphy Center on Tuesday for the inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium.

The symposium, hosted by ECU’s Economic Development and Engagement Council, brought together faculty members from across academic disciplines to showcase existing innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement opportunities offered by the university.

Matthew Nash gives a keynote address at East Carolina University’s inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium on Tuesday. The symposium introduced faculty members to innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement services provided by the university. (Photos by Matt Smith)

Matthew Nash gives a keynote address at East Carolina University’s inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium on Tuesday. The symposium introduced faculty members to innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement services provided by the university. (Photos by Matt Smith)

The event was highlighted by a keynote speech from Matthew Nash, managing director for social entrepreneurship at Duke University’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative. Faculty members also participated in roundtable discussions with leaders from ECU services including I-Corps, innovation spaces, community engagement, the Miller School of Entrepreneurship, crowd funding, the Research and Innovation Campus, the School of Dental Medicine’s community service learning centers, virtual technologies, the Center for STEM Education, the North Carolina Agromedicine Institute, and the Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Living and Learning Community.

Innovation, entrepreneurship and engaged research activities are enterprises that seek to build, improve, create or affect issues in a community. These activities could include creating a new product that serves a community need, opening a new business or applying academic knowledge to community-based issues with partners from inside and outside academia.

“When you’re trying to build a foundation for conducting innovative and engaged work, you have to think about how to fit the concept of innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement into faculty members’ productivity,” said Sharon Paynter, assistant vice chancellor for community engagement and research. “Today’s event was a way to show faculty members how they can connect to offices and programs that focus on IEE activities.”

Jennifer Watson discusses crowd funding opportunities to a group of ECU faculty members at ECU’s inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium.

Jennifer Watson discusses crowd funding opportunities to a group of ECU faculty members at ECU’s inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium.

Paynter said that the symposium also offered faculty members a chance to learn about IEE services to bring back to their students.

Department of Interior Design and Merchandising teaching instructor Tiffany Blanchflower agreed, saying that the event gave her a chance to learn how to connect her students with local community partners.

“Community engagement is the future and we need to embrace that,” Blanchflower said. “If we’re (faculty) only doing research for academia, it’s not going to impact society or our communities. The point of research is to solve problems. By conducting engaged research and by introducing students to engaged research, we’re better preparing students for what their future is going to look like outside of the classroom.”

In his speech, Nash touched on using innovation and entrepreneurship to impact social change. He said by asking students not what they will be, but what problem they are trying to solve, it changes the mindset of how students tackle regional disparities.

“We’re looking for new and improved ways to achieve impact,” Nash said. “We can no longer just imagine what the solutions are and hope that things will work out. We have to work with communities, define their needs with their support and create solutions.”

ECU offers a variety of IEE programs for faculty and students, including the Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy, the State Employees Credit Union Public Fellows Internship program, and the Community-University Partners Academy. For more information on innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement opportunities, visit www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/communityengagement/index.cfm.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Simulation brings awareness about living in poverty

About 50 East Carolina University students recently assumed the role of a family member living in poverty while juggling monthly bills, buying food or going to the doctor.

The students took part in a community action poverty simulation on March 16 at the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU. The simulation was led by Tamra Church, a teaching instructor in the College of Health and Human Performance’s Department of Health Education and Promotion, Kim Werth, a counselor in the School of Dental Medicine, and the Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement. Courtney Williams, a master’s student and graduate teaching assistant, was instrumental in planning, organizing and volunteering in the simulation as well as overseeing registration, lunch, snacks and community resource tables.

Students – most from a health behavior theory class in the Department of Health Education and Promotion - portray family members living on a budget in a recent poverty simulation held in the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU. (Photos by Josh Vaughan)

Students – most from a health behavior theory class in the Department of Health Education and Promotion – portray family members living on a budget in a recent poverty simulation held in the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU. (Photos by Josh Vaughan)

Church’s students are pre-health professionals and many are preparing for graduate school in physician assistant studies, occupational therapy, physical therapy, medicine, nursing or dentistry. Other graduates will go into the workforce where they will interact with people and patients from all walks of life.

“It was an opportunity to put themselves in the shoes of someone experiencing poverty,” Church said. “My goals for the simulation were to change beliefs about people experiencing poverty, increase students’ empathy towards people living in poverty and encourage them to get involved in more civic engagement.”

A student receives information for her simulation.

A student receives information for her simulation.

In the simulation, students were assigned to a family unit ranging from a single parent without a car to an elderly person having to pay for heat and medication for a month. The students sometimes faced unexpected challenges such as a death in the family or a break-in at their home. They interacted with service providers including employers, bankers, grocers, public schools or police officers portrayed by 14 volunteers from the School of Social Work, Pitt County Health Department and community.

“The poverty simulation accurately demonstrated the roller coaster of life that people in poverty have to live to get by day to day,” said Harlee Rowe, a public health studies major. “It was a shock of reality to see how much needs to be changed to help these people in need.”

Emmanuel McLeod, who is also in the public health studies program, said the activity was an eye-opening experience. “It has helped me to understand the daily lives they may face, and how the majority of the things they go through are out of their control,” McLeod said. “Despite this, we can reach out as a community and support those who need it.”

Students review materials for a community action poverty simulation held March 16.

Students review materials for a community action poverty simulation held March 16.

The simulation also taught students about available resources in the community.

After the event, some students said they planned to start having conversations about poverty while others planned to volunteer or start writing local government about issues.

“It changed my perception of how families in poverty deal with daily life struggles (that) the people who are not in poverty never have to think twice about,” said public health studies student Angela Bracco.

Church plans to offer the simulation each semester.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

ECU kicks off Research and Creative Achievement Week

A line of posters, students and judges in Mendenhall Student Center kicked off East Carolina University’s 2018 Research and Creative Achievement Week on March 26.

The 12th annual event features more than 440 research posters and presentations, giving undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students an opportunity to share their work with their peers and mentors.

Student Andra Glover (left) discusses her research poster with judges at the 2018 Research and Creative Achievement Week. The event began Monday at Mendenhall Student Center and runs through April 2. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Student Andra Glover (left) discusses her research poster with judges at the 2018 Research and Creative Achievement Week. The event began Monday at Mendenhall Student Center and runs through April 2. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

RCAW allows students from all disciplines – from biomedical sciences to visual arts and design – to practice their presentation skills and interact with other creative scholars on campus. Judges, made up of ECU faculty, staff and graduate students, provide a balanced evaluation of the students’ work, grading them on subject knowledge, effective medium use, clarity and question response, and originality and creativity. Awards are presented at the end of the week to both poster and oral presenters.

Left to right, guest panelists Bridget Todd, Allison Mathews and Suzanne Lazorick discuss how they have used research and creative achievement to change the world at RCAW’s opening session and discussion panel. (Photo by Matt Smith)

Left to right, guest panelists Bridget Todd, Allison Mathews and Suzanne Lazorick discuss how they have used research and creative achievement to change the world at RCAW’s opening session and discussion panel. (Photos by Matt Smith)

For the first time, RCAW held an opening session and panel discussion. The event featured digital strategist Bridget Todd, MATCH Wellness co-director Suzanne Lazorick and 2BeatHIV director and Community Expert Solutions CEO Allison Mathews. The trio hosted the panel “Run with New Ideas: Using Research and Creative Achievement to Effect Real World Change.” Todd, Lazorick and Mathews discussed their work with underserved communities – including women, children and minorities – and took questions from the crowd.

Katina Hilliard, a graduate student in the College of Health and Human Performance, said she wanted to go through the learning experience of presenting her research to others. Hilliard and her co-researcher’s study focused on the relationship between staff practices in an after-school service program and school connectedness.

“Presenting at RCAW gives you a lot of practice in public speaking,” Hilliard said. “Presenting your research to others is a big part of the research process and this gives you an opportunity to share in a safe setting. In the future when I present at conferences, I’ll be able to use this experience to guide me.

Research posters line the halls of Mendenhall Student Center for the opening of RCAW.

Research posters line the halls of Mendenhall Student Center for the opening of RCAW.

“Every one of the judges and students that come through RCAW are here to help you,” she said. “They’re not here to criticize or put your work down; they’re here to build you up and make your work better.”

RCAW Chairman and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies Tom McConnell agreed with Hilliard, emphasizing the importance of students dipping their research toes into public speaking.

“RCAW is all centered around our students,” McConnell said. “We want to give them a number of learning opportunities. These presentations are often the first presentations ECU students give and they gain valuable communication skills in the process. They also learn how to work with teammates and mentors – important skills to master if they plan to continue their research initiatives in the future.”

RCAW will run until April 2. More information is at https://blog.ecu.edu/sites/rcaw/.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Greenville science teacher receives inaugural John C. Park Scholarship

A new scholarship at East Carolina University helped send an eastern North Carolina science teacher to a national conference this month.

Allie Smith, an eighth grade science teacher at C.M. Eppes Middle School in Greenville, attended the annual National Science Teachers Association National Conference on Science Education in Atlanta.

Her trip was made possible by the John C. Park Scholarship, established this year by Dr. Leonard Annetta, the College of Education’s Taft Distinguished Professor of Science Education, and the ECU Center for STEM Education.

Dr. Leonard Annetta, right, and Shawn Moore, left, present eighth-grade C.M. Eppes Middle School teacher Allie Smith with the inaugural John C. Park Scholarship on  March 8 in her classroom. (Photos by Cole Dittmer)

Dr. Leonard Annetta, right, and Shawn Moore, left, present eighth-grade C.M. Eppes Middle School teacher Allie Smith with the inaugural John C. Park Scholarship on March 8 in her classroom. (Photos by Cole Dittmer)

The scholarship, valued at up to $1,500, provides funding for science teachers from eastern North Carolina in their first five years of teaching to attend the annual national conference. Going forward, the endowment will provide an award for two science teachers (one in grades K-5 and another in grades 6-12) each year.

“I am so grateful to ECU and the scholarship donors for this chance to attend this conference,” she said. “ECU has steadily provided me with unmatched opportunities while I earned my bachelor’s and master’s degrees, and they continue to do so now in my second year of teaching.”

John C. Park Scholarship recipient Allie Smith at the 2018 NSTA National Conference on Science Education in Atlanta.

John C. Park Scholarship recipient Allie Smith at the 2018 NSTA National Conference on Science Education in Atlanta.

Smith received her bachelor of science in middle grades education and her master of arts in education for middle grades from ECU with concentrations in math and science education.

The scholarship is named for John C. Park, who spent 25 years as a professor of science education at North Carolina State University where he had an influence on several members of ECU’s science education faculty.

“A leader by example, John dedicated his life to his family, his church, and to education,” Annetta said. “He created innovative ways of instilling others with the curiosity and desire to learn and positively impact the world around them.”

Annetta presented Smith with the inaugural scholarship on March 8 in her classroom. He shared a letter from Park’s wife, Lory Park, about what attending professional development conferences meant to her husband’s career.

The annual John C. Park Scholarship will provide funding for two science teachers from eastern North Carolina in their first five years of teaching to attend the annual NSTA National Conference on Science Education.

The annual John C. Park Scholarship will provide funding for two science teachers from eastern North Carolina in their first five years of teaching to attend the annual NSTA National Conference on Science Education.

“He was troubled by the cost and the low attendance of new teachers,” Lory Park said. “Although he had little control over the cost of a conference, he himself made an effort to get the attendance of teachers just starting their careers higher by providing funding through whatever means possible for these teachers.”

Smith said she hopes to bring her students more exposure to science education.

“My goal for going to the NSTA conference in Atlanta is to find affordable ways to bring authentic science experiences to my students,” Smith said. “As a teacher in a Title I school, I work with a majority of students who, for a plethora of reasons, are unable to engage with science in a meaningful way outside of my classroom.”

To qualify for the scholarship, teachers must have taught less than five years at the time of the application within the Latham Clinical Schools Network and be a National Science Teacher Association member in good standing.

For more information or to apply for the scholarship, contact Annetta at annettal16@ecu.edu or 252-328-6179.

 

-by Cole Dittmer, University Communications

‘Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine’ explains the disparity of mortality

Quinine bottles on display at Laupus Library (Photos contributed by Laupus Library History Collections)

Quinine bottles on display at Laupus Library (Photos contributed by Laupus Library History Collections)

The American Civil War occurred during a time when medicine was just beginning to make great strides. Contemporary doctors did not fully understand the origin of disease, the importance of hygiene, or the need for sterilized tools during surgery, but discoveries such as anesthesia improved the patient experience immensely.

In North Carolina, the war impacted both civilians and the medical community. Young men joined the war effort as soldiers, doctors joined the ranks to provide medical care, and women stepped up to aid with nursing.

Currently on exhibit through June 3 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of Laupus Library, “Fighting for their Lives: Medical Practices During the American Civil War” examines how doctors and medical staff cared for the soldiers, looking specifically at surgery, disease, infection and the role of hospitals.

“The items on display represent an era of medicine that seems quite foreign to us today,” said Layne Carpenter, Laupus Library history collections archivist. “During this time, anesthesia was fairly new. It was also a common belief that liquor could cure multiple ailments, and amputations were frequent.”

Amputation kit on display at Laupus Library

Amputation kit on display at Laupus Library

“The collection of items tells a story about medicine before people knew what germs were,” she continued. “I think viewers of this exhibit will develop a greater appreciation for modern medicine.”

War deaths from disease did not occur at the same rates across national and racial groups. Almost 17 percent of Confederate soldiers died from disease. In the Union Army, three times more black troops suffered disease deaths than white troops.

The Medical History Interest Group will host “Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine,” presented by Dr. Margaret Humphreys, the Josiah Charles Trent Professor in the History of Medicine at Duke University, on March 26 at 4:30 p.m. in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery.

Humphrey’s talk will explore the ways in which social determinants of health, particularly nutritious food and nursing care, explain much of this differential mortality.

The lecture will be followed by an opening reception for the exhibit. Refreshments will be provided. This event is free and open to the public. This is a Wellness Passport Event.

For more information email hslhistmed@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

ECU student to drive in NASCAR trucks race at Martinsville Speedway

East Carolina University students went far and wide during spring break, but Tyler Matthews was probably the only one working with a NASCAR race team preparing a truck for his national racing series debut this week.

The ECU junior takes that next step in his racing career Saturday at the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Alpha Energy Solutions 250 at the famed Martinsville Speedway in Virginia. The race starts at 2 p.m. and airs on FS1.

ECU student Tyler Matthews is shown after a late model stock win at East Carolina Motor Speedway in Robersonville in 2016. He takes the next step in his racing career Saturday at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia. (Contributed photos)

ECU student Tyler Matthews is shown after a late model stock win at East Carolina Motor Speedway in Robersonville in 2016. He takes the next step in his racing career Saturday at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia. (Contributed photos)

“We’ve been working for a couple of months to sign the contract deal, and the fact that it’s happening is a dream come true because I’ve always wanted to race in the top levels,” Matthews told the Jacksonville Daily News in January. “A lot of these drivers have been racing for a long time. So for me to do all of this in a short amount of time is awesome.”

Earlier this year, Matthews signed a three-race deal with MDM Motorsports in Mooresville to drive the No. 99 Chevrolet Silverado. In addition to Martinsville, Matthews is scheduled to race June 16 at Iowa Speedway in Newton, Iowa, and June 23 at Gateway Speedway in Madison, Illinois, just outside St. Louis.

Once he completes those races, NASCAR should approve him to compete on larger tracks, which the team could add to its schedule later this year, he said.

ECU junior Tyler Matthews

ECU junior Tyler Matthews

Matthews, from Richlands, is a construction management major in the College of Engineering and Technology at ECU. The 21-year-old won the 2016 late model track championship at Southern National Motorsports Park near Kenly and the 2017 late model championship at Carteret County Speedway near Swansboro.

He was the 2015 state NASCAR Whelen All-American Late Model Series Rookie of the Year and the series’ 2016 state champion.

The truck series is the bottom tier of NASCAR’s national touring series. Trucks race on a mix of short and intermediate ovals, superspeedways, two road courses and even a dirt track. Ford, Chevrolet and Toyota are represented in the series.

At 3,400 pounds, the trucks weigh about 300 pounds more than the late model stock cars Matthews is used to, and their 650-horsepower engines have about 250 more horsepower.

Matthews started racing 4-wheelers in enduro-type races through the woods when he was about 7, he said. In high school, he built his first race car for an entry-level division called UCAR and started racing late models – the top division at most local stock-car tracks – about five years ago.

His parents, Steve and Amanda Matthews, crew chief and former local racer Doug Barefoot (“He taught me a ton,” Matthews said.) and some high school friends, some of whom attend ECU, have helped him along the way.

“You have to enjoy what you do, and having your friends there makes it more fun,” he said.

Matthews said when semesters begin and professors ask students to talk about themselves, most of his classmates don’t really understand what he means when he says he’s a race car driver – the level of work and dedication it takes to succeed at just the local level. But when they see photos or come to a race, they get the idea.

Matthews plans to remain enrolled at ECU and then “see what happens for next year if I can make this full time,” he told the Daily News. But he added his parents have always insisted that school come before racing.

ECU junior Tyler Matthews works on the Chevrolet Silverado he will race in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race Saturday at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia.

ECU junior Tyler Matthews works on the Chevrolet Silverado he will race in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race Saturday at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia.

“It just gets difficult trying to focus on school and do the best you can in racing,” he said. “I just know I have to get my schoolwork done if I want to race. School comes first, or the racing will come to an end.”

Roger Burns, manager of Carteret County Speedway and father of two sons who race against Matthews, said he’s a “smooth driver” who has a bright future behind the wheel if all goes well.

“He and his dad worked really hard to get where he’s at,” Burns said.

Matthews said his main goal for his first truck series races is to run well, learn and stay out of trouble. Ultimately, he wants to compete full time in the series and then move up to the NASCAR Xfinity Series and Monster Energy Cup Series.

“That’s definitely my goal to one day run Cup, but that doesn’t always happen,” Matthews told the Daily News. “You have to make the best of what you have. You have to make the best of what opportunities you have.”

And for him, making the most of opportunities means one thing.

“I just want to win,” he said. “I’m so competitive I just want to win everything I do.”

In addition to his truck schedule, Matthews also hopes to compete in some late model races this year. Follow his progress on @TMatthews___ and on Facebook at tyler.matthews.731572.

 

-by Doug Boyd, University Communications

Dean emeritus receives medal for contributions to medical profession

Dr. Paul Cunningham, dean emeritus of the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, was recently honored in New York City for his contributions to the medical profession and for his achievements in academic leadership.

Cunningham was awarded the 2018 Jacobi Medallion on March 15 from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Cunningham, who served as dean at Brody from 2008 to 2016, completed his residency in surgery at Mount Sinai. He said he was humbled to receive the award, which ties him back to the roots of a strong foundation for his career in service, responsibility and medical expertise.

Dr. Paul R. G. Cunningham, dean emeritus of the Brody School of Medicine, was awarded the 2018 Jacobi Medallion for excellence in the medical profession from Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine. (Contributed photo)

Dr. Paul R. G. Cunningham, dean emeritus of the Brody School of Medicine, was awarded the 2018 Jacobi Medallion for excellence in the medical profession from Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine. (Contributed photo)

“The only way I’ve assimilated this is by making the analogous connection between the story of the prodigal son, and this welcome by the vaunted institution on 5th Avenue,” he said.

While the return to New York was nostalgic for Cunningham, faculty at Mount Sinai voiced admiration for his game-changing contributions to the field of medicine and to education.

“Dr. Paul Cunningham represents the very best of our profession,” said Dr. Reena Karani, senior associate dean for undergraduate medical education and curricular affairs at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine. “He dedicated his professional life to serving the most vulnerable in North Carolina and remains committed to equity and social justice in medicine.”

Karani “re-introduced” Cunningham to Mount Sinai, getting to know him in a professional setting and witnessing his encompassing knowledge and passion for medicine as well as his penchant for leadership.

“He listens carefully, acknowledges strengths, seeks a shared understanding of issues and promotes collaborative problem solving,” she said.

A surgeon by training, Cunningham was named Brody’s fifth dean in 2008. Previously an ECU trauma surgeon and educator, Cunningham as dean led the school in its devotion to producing primary care physicians for the state, increasing opportunities for underrepresented minorities in medical education and improving the health status of the citizens of eastern North Carolina. He recently completed a stint as president of the North Carolina Medical Society.

His time at ECU, he said, melded with his experience at Mount Sinai to be the best of both worlds, with much of his career achievement happening at ECU.

“Greenville and the Brody School of Medicine have commonalities with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,” he said, “and at the same time, we are worlds apart. I am clearly a product of both environments, but the greatest demonstration of any competency that I may have had has been in this place, ‘down here.’”

The Jacobi Medallion has been awarded by the Mount Sinai Alumni since 1952 for distinguished achievement in the field of medicine or extraordinary service to the hospital, the Icahn School of Medicine or to the Alumni Association.

Cunningham was one of nine 2018 Jacobi Medallion recipients.

He expressed his appreciation to Mount Sinai, and said its faculty encouraged him to press beyond his comfort zone and his own vision for himself and his potential.

“I achieved much more than I could have imagined when I thought that I wanted to be a surgeon at age 16,” Cunningham said. “Life comes at you with different opportunities at different times, and keeping and cultivating a sense of wonder can really open up exhilarating experiences.”

 

-by Spaine Stephens, University Communications

Enterprise is first company to donate to Pirate Nation Gives in 2018

Enterprise Holdings Inc. awarded East Carolina University with a $6,500 foundation grant on March 20 to help kick off ECU’s Pirate Nation Gives annual fundraising day. The grant honors all of the ECU graduates that go on to work for Enterprise.

Enterprise awards ECU with a $6,500 foundation grant that will be divided between Career Services and the Pirate Club. (Photo by Erin Shaw)

Enterprise awards ECU with a $6,500 foundation grant that will be divided between Career Services and the Pirate Club. (Photo by Erin Shaw)

ECU has had a long working relationship with Enterprise for its vehicle rental needs and utilizes the company for all short-term vehicle rentals. Enterprise also hires more students from ECU than any other school in North Carolina and has more than 100 Pirate alumni as employees.

“Enterprise Holdings takes pride in the partnership we share with ECU, not only fulfilling ground transportation needs across the university, but working with Career Services and recruiting ECU graduates to work for our company and excel through our management trainee program,” said Nina Gladysiewski, a transportation consultant at Enterprise.

“Our relationship is a true partnership. Enterprise is heavily involved in the success of our students after graduation,” added Adam Denney, associate director of employer relations at ECU.

Of the $6,500, $5,000 will go to ECU Career Services with the remaining $1,500 slated for the ECU Educational Foundation (Pirate Club).

 

-by Erin Shaw, University Communications

ECU College of Nursing inducts 11 into Hall of Fame

The ECU College of Nursing inducted 11 new members to its Hall of Fame on Friday, March 16, and honored its newest Distinguished Alumni Award winner during a ceremony at the Hilton Hotel Greenville.

The Hall of Fame, which honors outstanding contributors to nursing in education, administration, research and practice, has raised $116,000 for merit-based student nursing scholarships since 2011. It is one of only two academic hall of fame programs at ECU. This year’s event raised $25,000 in scholarship funds which were distributed among five students equally.

Eleven new members were inducted into the College of Nursing Hall of Fame on Friday, March 16, 2018, during a ceremony at the Hilton Greenville. The ceremony also honors a distinguished alumnus each year. (Photos by Conley Evans)

Eleven new members were inducted into the College of Nursing Hall of Fame on Friday, March 16, 2018, during a ceremony at the Hilton Greenville. The ceremony also honors a distinguished alumnus each year. (Photos by Conley Evans)

This year’s class includes inductees who have served in leadership roles for major medical centers, national health care non-profit organizations, higher education and the military. Two inductees were honored posthumously and their awards were accepted by family members on their behalf.

“This Hall of Fame not only recognizes our outstanding leaders, but is another way to give back to future generations of nurses,” said Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the College of Nursing.

Inductees to the College of Nursing Hall of Fame receive a flame-shaped award that mirrors the flame featured in the College of Nursing pin, representing a vibrant life.

Inductees to the College of Nursing Hall of Fame receive a flame-shaped award that mirrors the flame featured in the College of Nursing pin, representing a vibrant life.

The 2018 inductees join 100 other Hall of Fame members. Each receives a flame-shaped award that mirrors the flame featured in the College of Nursing pin, representing a vibrant life.

Two of this year’s Hall of Fame Scholarship recipients — Shana-Ann Caballes and Aaron Jamison — attended the event.

“Most people don’t know the process you have to go through to be a nurse anesthetist. It involves taking graduate-level courses in anatomy, physiology, pharmacology and clinical anesthesia courses as well. That’s the first 15 months. The following 15 months includes clinical aspects as well,” said Caballes, a senior in the college’s master’s program in nurse anesthesia. “Needless to say, it leaves absolutely no time for any outside employment. … I really appreciate this scholarship. It’s changed my life.”

This year’s Hall of Fame class:

  • Daphne Brewington, Winterville, NC
  • Beth Bryant, Greenville, NC
  • Howard Burtnett, Winterville, NC
  • Patricia Crane, Asheboro, NC
  • Phyllis DeAntonio, Greenville, NC
  • Mark Hand, Raleigh, NC
  • Janet Joyner, Greenville, NC
  • Deborah K. Kornegay, Wilmington, NC
  • Sandra Manning, Greenville, NC
  • Ann Schreier, Greenville, NC
  • Wanda Snyder, Garner, NC

The college also recognized the recipient of its 2018 Distinguished Alumni Award, Dr. Annette Wysocki. Wysocki received her Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing and Master’s of Science in Nursing from ECU and a PhD from the University of Texas at Austin. She serves as Associate Dean for Research and Professor at the College of Nursing at the University of Massachusettes, Amherst. She is also the Pilot Project Core Director of a $1.2 million P20 Center Grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communications

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