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Amanda Klein Freelance Work

Check of Dr. Amanda Klein’s freelance work:

Spinoff City: Why Hollywood Is Built on Unoriginal Ideas.” The Atlantic 20 March 2016.

Thirty Seasons of The Real World.” The New Yorker. 28 Nov 2015.

Consider the Catfish.” The New Yorker. 3 Sept 2015.

“‘Clueless’ and the end of Gen X: How Cher Horowitz taught us to stop worrying and embrace millennial optimism, post-racial fantasy and the 1 percent.” Salon. 15 July 2015.

“‘The Breakfast Club’, 30 Years Later: A Conversation Across Generations.” Roger Ebert.com. 26 March 2015.

With Christian Exoo, “Plagiarism, Patchwriting and the Race and Gender Hierarchy of Online Idea Theft.” Truth Out 13 March 2015.

Vaccinations and Public Concern in History: Legend, Rumor, and Risk Perception

Andrea Kitta’s book, Vaccinations and Public Concern in History: Legend, Rumor, and Risk Perception, was published by Routledge in 2012. The book explores vernacular beliefs and practices that surround decisions not to vaccinate. Through the use of ethnographic, media, and narrative analyses, this book reviews the vernacular explanatory models used in inoculation decision-making. For more information about the book visit https://www.routledge.com/Vaccinations-and-Public-Concern-in-History-Legend-Rumor-and-Risk-Perception/Kitta/p/book/9780415887038

Deena publishes “Exploration of Diversity and Globalization in Moshin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist and Nadine Gordimer’s The Pick Up”

“Exploration of Diversity and Globalization in Moshin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist and Nadine Gordimer’s The Pick Up.” Celebrating Diasporic Writing: A Critical Response to Indian and Pakistani Literature. Ed. R. K. Dhawan and Yamini Pendyala. New Delhi, India: Prestige Books International, 2016. 190-203.

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Cycles, Sequels, Spin-offs, Remakes and Reboots: Multiplicities in Film & Television

Amanda KleinCycles, Sequels, Spin-offs, Remakes and Reboots: Multiplicities in Film & Television. Co-edited with R. Barton Palmer. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2016.

https://utpress.utexas.edu/books/klein-palmer-cycles-sequels-spin-offs-remakes-and-reboots

Description

Surveying a wide range of international productions, this collection of essays by established and emerging scholars investigates the important cultural work performed by repetition, or multiplicities, in film and television

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The Academic Film Blog: A Eulogy (2000-2015).

Amanda Klein. “The Academic Film Blog: A Eulogy (2000-2015).” Film Criticism 40.1 (2016) < http://quod.lib.umich.edu/f/fc?page=home>.

Abstract

For a short period of time, approximately 2000-2015, blogs were a space of democratic exchange where rank disappeared and was replaced by the primacy of the idea and the passion for the idea, giving “public voice,” as Charles Taylor explains, “to the way movies function as private obsession.” ui r#N4i The film blog, which reached its peak in roughly 2009, offered a level of access to the critical stage in unprecedented ways for new scholars, while simultaneously giving established scholars an opportunity to break ranks.

book cover

Diagnosing Folklore Perspectives on Disability, Health, and Trauma

Diagnosing Folklore cover

Dr. Andrea Kitta’s co-authored Diagnosing Folklore provides an inclusive forum for an expansive conversation on the sensitive, raw, and powerful processes that shape and imbue meaning in the lives of individuals and communities beleaguered by medical stigmatization, conflicting public perceptions, and contextual constraints. This volume aims to showcase current ideas and debates, as well as promote the larger study of disability, health, and trauma within folkloristics, helping bridge the gaps between the folklore discipline and disability studies.

Kitta publishes Diagnosing Folklore

Congratulations to Dr. Andrea Kitta on the publication of her new co-authored book, Diagnosing Folklore: Perspectives on Disability Health and Trauma. The University Press of Mississippi sponsored a panel about this book at the American Folklore Society’s annual meeting.

With contributions by Sheila Bock, London Brickley, Olivia Caldeira, Diane E. Goldstein, Darcy Holtgrave, Kate Parker Horigan, Michael Owen Jones, Elaine J. Lawless, Amy Shuman, Annie Tucker, and Kristiana Willsey, Diagnosing Folklore provides an inclusive forum for an expansive conversation on the sensitive, raw, and powerful processes that shape and imbue meaning in the lives of individuals and communities beleaguered by medical stigmatization, conflicting public perceptions, and contextual constraints. This volume aims to showcase current ideas and debates, as well as promote the larger study of disability, health, and trauma within folkloristics, helping bridge the gaps between the folklore discipline and disability studies.

This book consists of three sections, each dedicated to key issues in disability, health, and trauma. It explores the confluence of disability, ethnography, and the stigmatized vernacular through communicative competence, esoteric and exoteric groups in the Special Olympics, and the role of family in stigmatized communities. Then, it considers knowledge, belief, and treatment in regional and ethnic communities with case studies from the Latino/a community in Los Angeles, Javanese Indonesia, and Middle America. Lastly, the volume looks to the performance of mental illness, stigma, and trauma through contemporary legends about mental illness, vlogs on bipolar disorder, medical fetishism, and veteran’s stories.

Go here to learn more about the book: http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1862

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Home and Diasporic Imagination: Incorporating Immigrant Writer Chang Shi-Kuo in (Chinese) American Literary Studies.

Su-Ching Huang. “Home and Diasporic Imagination: Incorporating Immigrant Writer Chang Shi-Kuo in (Chinese) American Literary Studies.” Asiatic: IIUM Journal of English Language and Literature 9.1 (2015): 68-80.

Abstract

As part of a larger project aiming to include Sinophone US literature in US literary studies, this essay focuses on the Taiwan immigrant writer Chang Shi-Kuo’s work and his recurrent themes, such as the obsession with China, the anxiety over patrilineal transmission, male hysteria and racial melancholia. The thematic concerns and stylistic experimentalism in Chang’s fiction intersect with those of other ethnic Chinese writers in the US, whether they write in Chinese or English. Focusing on Chang’s fiction and its engagement of the diasporic imagination with the aforementioned themes, this paper examines Chang’s portrayals of US and Taiwan/Chinese societies. While his characters’ US experience often suggests a critique of technocracy and commercialism, and the ensuing interpersonal alienation in the US, his depiction of Taiwan seems more nuanced and sanguine. I propose to read the discrepancy between such portrayals as resulting more from diasporic nostalgia than from lived experience. Despite Chang’s explicit attachment to Taiwan, he is also quite aware of his immigrant status. Observing the transition of student immigrants into US citizens, he rejects the label of -Overseas Student literaturel; instead, he contends that student immigrant literature will gradually become the literature of the adopted country. Chang’s affinity with US-born Chinese American writers can be observed in his Chinese protagonists’ male hysteria, which hints at the dissolution of traditional Chinese gender division in North America. The inability to sustain a traditional Chinese family in North America suggests a failure to ensure a profitable future for the Chinese diaspora, which I describe as anxiety over patrilineal transmission, after the Asian American critic Sau-ling Wong. Such male hysteria not only harks back to the -obsession with Chinal but also points to an affinity between Sinophone US literature and Chinese American literature written in English by US-born Chinese American writers.

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