Profile Picture of Dr. Donna Kain

Information Usability Testing as Audience and Context Analysis for Risk Communication.

Donna J. Kain, Catherine F. Smith, and Menno T. De Jong. (2010). Information Usability Testing as Audience and Context Analysis for Risk Communication.  In Usability of Complex Information Systems: Evaluation of User Interaction. Eds. Michael Albers and Brian Still. New York: CRC Press (Taylor and Francis).

https://www.crcpress.com/Usability-of-Complex-Information-Systems-Evaluation-of-User-Interaction/Albers-Still/p/book/9781138114609

 

Profile Picture of Dr. Matthew Cox

The Relationship Between Innovation and Professional Communication in the ‘Creative’ Economy.

Matthew B. Cox with David E. Hailey Jr. and Emily Loader. “The Relationship Between Innovation and Professional Communication in the ‘Creative’ Economy.” Journal of Technical Writing and Communication – Volume 40, Number 2, April 2010.

Abstract: We evaluate 45 jobs professional communicators might occupy. Specifically, we examine the impact of creativity on careers that may become more or less easily outsourced domestically or offshore in the future. We are unable to find any particular relationship between creativity, per se, and job security. Instead, we find that people with knowledge of the processes required for innovation are more valued by industry than those recognized as creative. We suggest that to be prepared for the evolution of the global economy, technical communicators and their educators should understand “innovation” in its formal context and be able to apply that knowledge in their workplaces and classrooms.

Profile Picture of Dr. Donna Kain

Making Sense of Hurricanes: Public Discourse and Perceived Risk of Extreme Weather.

Smith, Catherine F., Donna J. Kain. (2010). Making Sense of Hurricanes: Public Discourse and Perceived Risk of Extreme Weather. Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis across Disciplines 4.2: 180-196.

http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/journals/cadaad/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Volume-4_Smith-Kain.pdf

Abstract: Our case study of hurricane risk and emergency communication in a high-risk county on the US southeastern coast shows residents actively processing information available in public discourse about hazardous storms. To construct meaningful assessments of personal risk, local people interpret and evaluate alternate representations of storm events produced by government emergency managers, local and national news media, and commonsense local lore. Using combined methods, we analyze empirical evidence of narratives communicated by residents and by journalists. As contribution to study of risk perception, this article describes mechanisms of interpretation and evaluation by which people perceive weather related danger and make judgments about it.

Profile Picture of Dr. Michelle Eble

Stories of Mentoring: Theory & Praxis.

Michelle F. EbleStories of Mentoring: Theory & Praxis. (Edited with Lynee Lewis Gaillet). Parlor Press, 2008.

http://www.parlorpress.com/mentoring.html

Description

Stories of Mentoring: Theory and Praxis defines the current status of mentoring in the field of composition and rhetoric by providing both snapshots and candid descriptions of what that mentoring means to those working in the discipline. Seventy-eight contributors offer a wide array of evidence and illustrations in an effort to define what mentoring entails, its important benefits and consequences, and its role in creating the future character of the field. Readers will find program descriptions and critiques, testimonials and personal anecdotes, copies of correspondence and e-mail messages, term projects and assignments, accounts of forged friendships and peer relationships (some good, some not-so-good), both new paradigms and familiar constructs for successful mentoring, tales of pregnancy and mothering, chronicles of both administrative nightmares and dream solutions, and inspiring stories revealing the character of those rare individuals who embody the term mentor.

Profile Picture of Dr. Michelle Eble

Digital Spaces, Online Environments, and Human Participant Research: Interfacing with Institutional Review Boards.

Michelle F. Eble. “Digital Spaces, Online Environments, and Human Participant Research: Interfacing with Institutional Review Boards.” (with William Banks) Digital Writing Research: Technologies, Methodologies, and Ethical Issues. Eds. Danielle DeVoss and Heidi McKee. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2007. 27-47.

http://www.hamptonpress.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=1-57273-705-0&Category_Code=Q307

Photo of Dr. Michael Albers

Communication of Complex Information: User Goals and Information Needs for Dynamic Web Information

Dr. Michael Albers‘ book, Communication of Complex Information: User Goals and Information Needs for Dynamic Web Information, was published by Routledge in 2004. His article, “Usability and Information Relationships: Considering Content Relationships When Testing Complex Information” is also featured in the book. This book helps develop a foundation for analysis and design which supports the approaches to providing the complex information which people require to address real world situations. For more information about the book visit http://www.tandfebooks.com/isbn/9781410611543

Profile Picture of Dr. Michelle Eble

Educating ‘Community Intellectuals’: Rhetoric, Moral Philosophy, and Civic Engagement

Michelle F. Eble. “Educating ‘Community Intellectuals’: Rhetoric, Moral Philosophy, and Civic Engagement.” (with Lynée Lewis Gaillet) Technical Communication Quarterly 13.3 (Summer 2004), 341-354.

Abstract: This article encourages technical and professional communication programs to take on the challenge of educating students to become ‘community intellectuals,’ The notion of educating future professionals for a career needs to be reconsidered in light of both current research concerning civic rhetoric and past practices in moral humanism courses. The triumvirate of rhetoric, ethics, and moral philosophy provides an effective foundation for reconfiguring existing pedagogy in the field and offers insights for nurturing community intellectuals.

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