Lindsay Saunders at Lobby Day NC, Group Photo 6-28-16

Join ECU Alumni Lindsay Saunders and her fundraising campaign Speak Up

Check out and take advantage of this opportunity to help ECU alumna Lindsay Saunders!!

Saunders is a grassroots advocate with “RESULTS-a movement of passionate, committed everyday people. Together, we use our voices to influence political decisions that will bring an end to poverty.”

Saunders is “participating in Speak Up, a fundraising campaign to support RESULTS and the work that [she does] as an advocate with RESULTS Raleigh, a local chapter which [she] started nearly 2 years ago. Saunders’ goal is to raise $250 by May 26.”

Saunders says, “Giving to my Speak Up Campaign supports my work, and the work of volunteer advocates across the country, to influence political decisions through meeting with members of Congress, writing op-eds, and mobilizing our communities. Will you please contribute and support my advocacy work with RESULTS and advocates like me across the country?

CONTRIBUTE HERE: https://results.salsalabs.org/…/lindsaysspeakupf…/index.html

Read more about Linday and her advocacy work here: ECU alum Lindsay Saunders recently published in the News & Observer

Lindsay Saunders at Lobby Day NC, Group Photo 6-28-16

Photo of Dr. Frost, Dr. Kitta, and Dr. Wilson-Nakamura

Congratulations to English’s teaching award winners!

In addition to news of Rick Taylor being recognized with the UNC Board of Governors Distinguished Professor for Teaching Award and Nicole Sidhu receiving her Scholar-Teacher Award, several other colleagues were celebrated and recognized at the University Teaching Awards ceremony.

Also recognized were Erin Frost (finalist for Alumni Association/Jones Teaching Award), Andrea Kitta (nominee for Alumni Association/Jones Teaching Award), and David Wilson-Okamura (nominee for Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching).

It is also worth mentioning that applying for teaching awards is an especially involved process, and the department is grateful to the winners and the nominees for representing English so well in their application materials.

Photo of professor Guiseppe Getto

Guiseppe guest co-edits issue of Journal of the Society for Technical Communication

Congratulations to Guiseppe Getto, who guest co-edited the May 2017 issue of the journal Technical Communication. This special issue focuses on culturally sensitive user experience (UX design). You can read the guest editors’ introduction to the special issue here: https://www.stc.org/techcomm/2017/05/10/localizing-user-experience-strategies-practices-and-techniques-for-culturally-sensitive-design/.

Photo of Dr. Anna Froula

ECU faculty receive national funding to work with veterans and their families

Three East Carolina University faculty members have been awarded almost $98,000 in grant funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities to work with veterans and their families.

Dr. Jennifer McKinnon, associate professor of history in the Maritime Studies Program and project director, Dr. Anna Foula, associate professor of film studies in the Department of English, and Dr. Anne Ticknor, associate professor of literacy studies in the College of Education, comprise the interdisciplinary research team.

The faculty members will work with Saipanese veterans of contemporary wars, surviving civilian participants of World War II and families of military service personnel to learn more about war’s universal impact on humanity.

McKinnon has collaborated with the Saipan community for nearly 10 years on heritage sites on land and under water. Froula has published widely on the representations of war and service personnel in popular culture as well as advises student veterans at ECU. Ticknor, a literacy educator for 20 years, researches identities.

Two ECU proposals were among 15 projects to receive funding through the NEH Dialogues on the Experience of War grant program. Part of NEH’s Standing Together initiative, the grants provide opportunities for veterans, through the study and discussion of important humanities sources, to think more deeply about issues raised by war and military service.

The funding will allow ECU faculty to travel to Saipan for two weeks in July to prepare community members with interest in humanities, history, and veteran affairs to become discussion leaders.

The researchers will lead discussion groups with local, primarily Chamorro and Carolinian, veterans to develop an understanding of war as a shared human experience and the associated cultural heritage of war on Saipan. Discussion will center on the Spanish-Chamorro Wars of the 17th century and the World War II Battle of Saipan as bookends to the history of resistance and aggressions in the islands. These wars were chosen because they represent the complexities of all of the participants of war, combatant and non-combatant, in a colonial and post-colonial context.

Participants will gain an understanding of the meaning of war from different perspectives through the exploration of terrestrial and underwater cultural heritage, film, history, memoirs, children’s historical fiction, poetry, paintings and graphic novels.

“Underwater cultural heritage, just one of many humanities sources used in this project, is not typically thought of as an entry or gateway into discussing large societal issues like identity, conflict or even the potential for healing,” McKinnon said. “This is why I’m so excited to explore this possibility with my colleagues and the community.”

McKinnon, Froula and Ticknor anticipate that the personal interactions with the physical remains of heritage sites as well as humanities texts and films will provide a new or renewed sense of cultural value for both the veterans’ experiences and the local conflict heritage.

NEH panel reviewers commented that the project was distinct from other proposals with significant potential for intergenerational impact. Since launching the initiative in 2014, the NEH has awarded more than $7.7 million for humanities projects that serve veterans or chronicle their experiences.

For more information about maritime studies at ECU, visit http://www.ecu.edu/history/.

For more information about the English department, visit http://www.ecu.edu/english/.

For more information about literacy studies, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/LEHE/read/literacy_home.cfm.

Jared Price smiles at the camera

Alumnus Spotlight: Jared Price

Jared Price (1995) earned the Department of English’s graduate certificate in TESOL–Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

Where are you from and what brought you to ECU?

I was born in Raleigh, N.C.

What brought you to ECU?

My love of Spanish and desire to study language(s) brought me to ECU.

How did you decide to pursue the graduate certificate in TESOL, and what else did you study?

When I first sought to get my teaching license in Spanish, they suggested that I also get certified in ESL, since they were critical areas and gave me a better chance to find gainful employment as a teacher. Ha ha when I first went back to ECU, I didn’t truly understand what an “add on” licensure really was at the time. I just did what I was told. To be very honest with you, I didn’t realize how important my TESOL certificate would be on my resume until years later (Dr. Cope can attest to this).

What have you been up to since your graduation and what are your goals for the future?

After graduating in 1995, I began teaching in 1997. I have taught Spanish and ESL grades K-12 for about 15 years now. I have spent the last 4 consecutive years living, working, and studying in Bangkok, Thailand. My son, Gabriel, was born here. I also studied and received my Master of education. I am very proud of these accomplishments. Although I am certified in Spanish and ESL, I have taught grades K2 and 2 in Thailand. I consider all of the kids my ESL students. I especially love my K2 babies.

 

 

In terms of academics, I do aspire to get my Masters in Hispanic Linguistics. I have such a love for the Spanish language. In terms of ESL and linguistics, I am fascinated how the learning of one’s L1 can affect their L2. I am so psyched about studying at N.C. State University. I truly love to learn! Getting my PhD is a definite possibility. I would like to do research in perhaps Sociolinguistics or bilingualism. I would enjoy teaching as a college professor. Only time will tell. God has blessed me with this opportunity and I will definitely take advantage of it.

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What recognitions/achievements are you most proud of and why?

I am most proud of being offered this fine opportunity at N.C. State University. I am also very proud of my Eagle Scout award.

What was most rewarding/exciting about your time in the Department of English?

My entire experience at ECU was a joy! I absolutely loved college! In 1994, I received a $1500 scholarship to study in Monterrey, Mexico. It was awesome!

What elements of your education in the Department of English and/or your TESOL studies have been most instrumental to your success?

Thanks to Dr. Cope and my studies in the areas of Second Language acquisition and Second language learning, I have become much more aware of how languages are acquired and learned. I want to learn more so I can be a better educator. I thirst for knowledge. Being able to study both language and linguistics at N.C.S.U. is so exciting! I can’t wait!

Anything to add?

Life is like a thick, juicy steak. Dig deep and take a big bite!

two women in graduation regalia smile at the camera

Congrats, Spring 2017 Grads!

The Department of English hosted its graduation ceremony at 2 p.m. Friday, May 5, in Hendrix Theatre. Five students received their PhDs, 18 received their MAs, and 22 received their BAs. In addition, 15 certificates were awarded.

Visit the department’s Facebook page for more photos!

The following students earned the Doctor of Philosophy in Rhetoric, Writing, and Professional Communication:

Dr. Alana Faye Baker

Dr. Janine Marie Butler

Dr. Ryan Chad Holt

Dr. Therese Indira Pennell

Dr. Stephanie J. West-Puckett

The following students earned the Master of English:

Teresa Marie Bryson

Lindsay Robin Bundrick

Emma H. Calow

Peter Thomas Campbell

Jason Wilks Fetzgerald

Joshua Richard Gardner

Constance Monique Haywood

Pamela E. Henderson-Kirkland

Sterling Eugene-Elon James

Rosemary Martina McMahon

Randall August Meisenhelder

Rocky Elizabeth Patacsil

Tiffany Eve Price

Edward Allen Reges

Sarah Beth Cox Robbins

Jonah Evan Schwartz

Meghann Alanna Totherow

Darryl Washington-Hardy

The following students earned the Bachelor of Arts in English:

Amanda Celestial Adkins

David Joseph Baker

Joseph Abram Graham Bannerman

Brooke Lauren Belcher

Ryann Lynn Bryant

Josephine Anne Cariño

Jasmine C. Cruz

Shaquille Dixon

Ellen King Franks

Cati Garretson

Seth Thomas Culledge

Julia Mary Horiates

Maria Infante

Julia Paige Jensen

Christian JamesMatthews

Jason Alexander McCleary

Sarah Elizabeth McKeever

Joshua Andrew Moore

Dominique Isreal Reyes-Hildel

Crystal Danielle White

Brandon Lamont Williams

Maya Lawann Williams

Congratulations to all!

 

 

Dr. Mark Johnson presents outstanding paper on non-native English speaking teacher issues award

At this year’s TESOL convention in Seattle, Dr. Mark Johnson presented Dr. Li-Shih Huang of Victoria University in Canada with the award for an outstanding paper on non-native English speaking teacher (NNEST) issues, an award which is sponsored by ECU’s Department of English.

Dr. Huang’s paper, Reappraising the Use of Learners’ L1 in ELT, examined common teacher attitudes toward the use of students’ first languages in the English language classroom, refuting these attitudes with more recent evidence to suggest that the use of the first language can (a) be an important aid in teaching the second language and (b) promote a number of cognitive advantages associated with multilingualism.

Jessica Bardill Profile Picture

Congratulations to Dr. Jessica Bardill

Congratulations to Dr. Jessica Bardill, who has a busy summer scheduled. She will participate in the Mining Ethnicity Colloquium at Stanford University (a joint effort to strengthen conversations and connections between comparative race studies and the digital humanities) in May, give a paper at the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association annual meeting in June, and help lead the Summer Internship for Indigenous Peoples in Genomics (SING) workshop at the University of Arizona in July. 

 

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