Davis

Davis earns digital rhetoric fellowship

Fourth-year PhD student Carleigh Davis has been selected as one of the Sweetland Digital Rhetoric Collaborative (DRC) Graduate Fellows for the 2017-2018 year. This Graduate Fellows program “aims to recognize graduate students currently working in digital rhetoric who want practical experience in online publishing and website development. Fellows are selected on a yearly basis by the editors and board of the DRC, and receive an annual stipend of $500 as well as recognition on the DRC website.” —http://www.digitalrhetoriccollaborative.org/about/fellows/

To read more about Carleigh and her research, check out the following: http://www.digitalrhetoriccollaborative.org/2017/09/14/carleigh-davis-introduction/

UWC “Writes for Change”

Monday’s “Design for Change” event in remembrance of 9/11 was well attended and successful. Congratulations to University Writing Center Director Dr. Nikki Caswell, University Writing Center Assistant Director and English PhD student Ceci Shelton, and the staff of the University Writing Center, who joined the Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement to put on the event. At the UWC’s “Write for Change” table, students wrote over 40 letters to local and national government officials. The event was widely covered in area press; links are below for those who’d like to learn more.

Daily Reflector: http://www.reflector.com/News/2017/09/12/Too-young-to-remember-old-enough-to-learn.html

WNCT: http://wnct.com/2017/09/11/911-memorial-ceremonies-held-across-eastern-north-carolina/

East Carolinian: http://www.theeastcarolinian.com/news/article_2403e1fc-9733-11e7-8070-abe4d4e192ce.html

award winners

Sparrow Writing Award winners announced

Joyner Library announced the winners of the annual W. Keats Sparrow Writing Award for student research during an Aug. 23 ceremony. Sponsored by the Friends of Joyner Library, the award was named in honor of Dr. W. Keats Sparrow, professor emeritus of English and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The award recognizes excellence in research and writing by students enrolled in English 1100 and 2201 composition classes during the summer and fall of 2016 and spring of 2017 semesters.

“Every August as the fall semester begins, we have the pleasure of recognizing three students whose English composition papers were selected for the W. Keats Sparrow Award,” said Jan Lewis, director for Joyner Library. “It is a wonderful way to start the new academic year and reaffirm the close connections between Joyner Library and the Department of English.”

Eligibility criteria required students’ papers to include a research component using Joyner Library’s resources.

Entries were judged on the quality of the research as well as the quality of the writing by a panel comprised of faculty from the Department of English and Joyner Library. Members of this year’s panel included: Dr. Tracy Ann Morse, director of composition/writing foundations; Grace Horne, teaching instructor, Department of English; and Meghan Wanucha, coordinator of instructional assessment, Joyner Library.

Winning the award for first place — and a $500 prize — was Jasmine M. Perry, in the department of Psychology in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts & Sciences, for “Homophobic Attitudes in Men.”

“This award means a lot to me,” said Perry. “In my life I have never been first place at anything, so winning this award shows how I have grown as a person, and it shows how dedicated I am to my area of study.”

Perry said the inspiration behind her winning paper came from personal experiences with friends and family members that are homosexual.

“I know that ‘coming out’ is a hard thing to do, and it requires a lot of confidence and a strong support system,” she said. “If people around you are homophobic it can lead to emotional turmoil and possibly suicide. I am so empathetic when I hear or read stories about people being bullied or abused due to their sexuality.”

Two additional award winners were:

Jenna M. Murdock, majoring in elementary education in the College of Education, in second place — a $300 prize — for “Motivating Students to Read.”

Carly E. Shomsky, in the department of Recreation and Leisure Studies in the College of Health and Human Performance, in third place — a $150 prize — for “Sensory Processing Disorder.”

Second-place winner Jenna Murdock said the competition was the perfect opportunity for her to do more research on how to motivate students to read required texts. “I really enjoyed putting this paper together and it was more than just an assignment I completed for a grade,” she said. “I was able to learn so much new and valuable information that will help me become a better teacher in the future.”

“I think it’s wonderful that Joyner Library offers awards and competitions for students,” she said. “It helps further our writing skills and allows us to explore the many resources offered by the library.”

Carly Shomsky, the third-place winner, believes students really benefit from the opportunity to participate in Joyner Libraries awards and competitions. “It not only encourages students to receive good grades, but it also offers them the feeling of accomplishment,” she said.

“This award showed me how far I have come within my writing and as a person. Hard work and determination really do pay off.”

Also deserving recognition are the instructors of the English 2201 sections that produced the winners.  Dr. Tracy Ann Morse was Jasmine Perry’s and Jenna Murdock’s instructor, and Marc Petersen was Carly Shomsky’s instructor.

“This year’s award recipients clearly selected topics relevant to their lives and majors and used the assignment to improve their discipline-based research and writing skills,” said Lewis. “Congratulations to each of them for their outstanding work.”

For more information on how to participate in next year’s awards, contact David Hisle at 328-4978 or by email at hisled@ecu.edu.

Re-posted from:

Joyner Library celebrates excellence in student research and writing

Froula

Froula’s Soldier to Scholar program aids veterans

East Carolina fall classes are right around the corner, but one new program is already getting a head start, helping veterans bridge the gap between a life in the service and one as a student.

The program is the brainchild of film studies associate professor Anna Froula, who designed the Soldier to Scholar program as a means of aiding soldiers and their fellow campusmates.

“My father is a Vietnam war veteran, my grandfather is World War II and my cousin is in Iraq so solider stories, veteran stories, veterans representation in popular culture, that’s always been at the heart of my research,” Froula said. “It’s my hope that we can move toward better conversations not just about or military but with our veterans. Move past ‘thank you for your service,’ but more productive conversations about what veterans need when they come home.”

From WCTI12: Read the whole story

Console-ing passions logo

English dept hosts int’l media and gender conference

By Kelly Setzer

Re-posted from http://blog.ecu.edu/sites/ecunow/blog/2017/07/20/ecu-to-host-international-media-and-gender-conference/

East Carolina University will host the 2017 Console-ing Passions: International Conference on Television, Video, Audio, New Media and Feminism July 27-29. Registration will be held in the Bate Building at 8 a.m. each day.

Console-ing Passions was founded in 1989 by a group of feminist media scholars and artists looking to create a space to present work and foster scholarship on issues of television, culture and identity with an emphasis on gender and sexuality. Console-ing Passions is comprised of a board of scholars whose interests converge around the study of media. The first CP conference was held at the University of Iowa in 1992.

The conference promotes the discussion and awareness of issues of gender identity and expressions, among other topics. More than 200 people — undergraduate students, graduate students, professors, independent scholars and artists — will be presenting scholarly and creative work at the conference.

In support of its mission to rally the community towards a more productive dialogue about gender identity and representation, civil rights and public policy, the conference will feature two lunchtime roundtables devoted to discussing LGBT-related legislation in North Carolina. The conference will also host a fundraiser for ECU’s LGBT Resource Office on Friday, July 28 at Crave Restaurant, with music by Greenville’s Nuclear Twins. Funds raised will support student scholarships.

The conference’s opening session will take place at 6 p.m. July 27 in the Faulkner Gallery in Joyner Library.

Console-ing Passions is celebrating 25 years of international feminist media studies scholarship, and the CP@ECU plenary will be a celebration of the conference’s origins and founders. Two of the conference’s original founders — Mary Beth Haralovich of the University of Arizona and Lauren Rabinovitz or the University of Iowa — will reflect on Console-ing Passions’ origins, history and future. Board member Brenda Weber of Indiana University will also speak about how the organization has grown and changed over time and about the future of feminist media studies.

The conference keynote will begin at 6 p.m. in Fletcher Hall on July 29. Keynote speaker Michelle Lanier is the director of the North Carolina African American Heritage Commission and senior program director of Traditions & Heritage at the N.C. Arts Council. After a welcome by ECU Provost Ron Michelson, Lanier will deliver her talk, “Pine Straw, Tobacco Fund & the Secret/Sacred ‘Beading Bees’: Making Place and Meaning on these Afro-Carolina Landscapes.”

For more information, please visit http://www.console-ingpassions.org.


Contact: Dr. Amanda Klein, ECU Department of English, kleina@ecu.edu

English grad student participates in prestigious Washington, D.C. workshop

East Carolina University English graduate student Sarah McKeever was one of only 12 students nationwide selected to participate in a highly-competitive workshop at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.

The library is home to the world’s largest Shakespeare collection and one of the nation’s premier research libraries for Renaissance history, literature and culture.

“I felt incredibly lucky to receive this opportunity, which is a dream come true,” said McKeever.

Marianne Montgomery, chair of the Department of English, was thrilled that McKeever was selected to participate in the workshop held June 26-30.

“Sarah was among peers who share her passion for Renaissance literature and had the opportunity to study with top visiting faculty from around the nation,” said Montgomery. “We are proud of Sarah and know that she represented ECU well.”

While at the library, McKeever and other scholars worked in small teams to digitally encode and format early modern dramas not yet included in the digital archives. The authors of the dramas are contemporaries of Shakespeare and their digital presence will supplement the current collection at the library.

“I have been in awe of the Folger Library’s rare collection for as long as I can remember and was excited to step foot within its hallowed walls,” said McKeever. “It was exciting to work directly with the rare manuscripts in the vault’s reading rooms.”

The workshop complemented McKeever’s interests and immersions at ECU. For three years, McKeever has served as an editorial assistant to English professor Dr. Jeffrey Johnson on the John Donne Variorum project, a multi-volume digital anthology of John Donne’s poetry.

“Sarah is an imaginative and insightful thinker, one whose intellectual curiosity and intellectual humility are the hallmarks for why she is such an accomplished student, as well as a promising scholar,” said Johnson.

This fall, McKeever will begin work on a master’s degree in English and intends to focus even more on Renaissance literature.

“ECU has an incredibly stellar Renaissance literature program and faculty, and ECU has been the most fortuitous place that I could have begun my path in early modern literary studies,” said McKeever.

“Familiarity with the treasure-trove of Folger resources will enhance my research in graduate school and greatly inform my interpretations,” said McKeever.

After completing her master’s degree, McKeever wants to pursue a doctoral program. She plans to dedicate her scholastic life to early modern studies and hopes to never cease learning – and perhaps teaching – about its literary works. In addition, she finds digital technology an exciting supplement to literary texts.

“I am very enthusiastic about the development of digital anthologies; their creation being at the forefront of literary innovation today,” said McKeever. “Access to these materials will benefit future scholars in the same ways that they have been beneficial for me.”

For additional information about the Folger workshop, visit http://folgerpedia.folger.edu/Opening_the_Digital_Anthology_of_Early_Modern_English_Drama:_Skills,_Tools,_and_Texts_(workshop).

 

-by Lacey Gray, University Communication

See original article here

Photo of Erin Frost

Erin Frost Gives Keynote at the 2017 Feminist Scholars Digital Workshop

Dr. Erin A. Frost was a Keynote Speaker at the 2017 Feminist Scholars Digital Workshop last week. Her workshop, “Feminist Credibility: Negotiating Subjectivity in Public Spaces,” examined the ways women’s experiences are often treated as less credible than other perspectives in supposedly “objective” and “neutral” spaces, from research to politics. Dr. Frost also created a website that contains a variety of resources on feminist credibility, along with a collaborative Google doc that participants were asked to contribute to.

Photo of Erin Frost

Dr. Erin Frost giving keynote workshop.

 

A link to this website resource can be found here: http://feministcredibility.weebly.com

A link to a recorded version of FSDW’s keynote workshop with Dr. Erin Frost can be found here:

https://jmu.webex.com/jmu/ldr.php?RCID=c9448a97971bfb890baa25673b951a90

 

FSDW Logo 2017

 

The Feminist Scholars Digital Workshop (FSDW) is a biennial, online, interdisciplinary workshop for individuals working on feminist-oriented research projects. The workshop is sponsored by HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory) and James Madison University’s School of Writing, Rhetoric and Technical Communication.

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