Department of English News

Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Eight MA grads headed for further studies

Pictured below in the front row are: Shane Combs, who will pursue a PhD in English Studies at Illinois State University; Kristi Wiley, who will pursue a PhD in Rhetoric and Writing at Michigan State University; and Abigail Morris, who will pursue a PhD in Rhetoric, Writing, and Professional Communication here at East Carolina University. Pictured in the back row are: Tim Buchanan, who will pursue an MFA in Creative Writing at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Rafael Gamero, who will pursue a MFA in Creative Writing at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Christina Rowell, who will pursue a PhD in Literacy, Rhetoric, and Social Practice at Kent State University; and Chris Urban, who will pursue a PhD in Literature at West Virginia University. Not pictured is Bryan McMillan, who will pursue a PhD in Literature at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

The Department of English is proud to announce that eight May 2015 graduates of the MA program have been admitted to graduate programs and will continue their studies in the fall. Pictured in the front row are: Shane Combs, who will pursue a PhD in English Studies at Illinois State University; Kristi Wiley, who will pursue a PhD in Rhetoric and Writing at Michigan State University; and Abigail Morris, who will pursue a PhD in Rhetoric, Writing, and Professional Communication here at East Carolina University. Pictured in the back row are: Tim Buchanan, who will pursue an MFA in Creative Writing at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Rafael Gamero, who will pursue an MFA in Creative Writing at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Christina Rowell, who will pursue a PhD in Literacy, Rhetoric, and Social Practice at Kent State University; and Chris Urban, who will pursue a PhD in Literature at West Virginia University. Not pictured is Bryan McMillan, who will pursue a PhD in Literature at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.


Cook and Martin honored by Phi Beta Kappa

Ava Cook and Kristen Martin, both English undergraduate students, were honored last week by the East Carolina University Division of Academic Affairs and the Eastern Carolina Alumni Association of Phi Beta Kappa.

“Among the most satisfying things that I get to do as Dean is to recognize the outstanding achievements of our students,” said Dr. William M. Downs, dean of the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, who provided welcoming remarks at the ceremony. “Today we are celebrating our most accomplished students in the liberal arts as they near the completion of their undergraduate studies.”

Students were honored from biology, chemistry, engineering, political science, mathematics, history, education, psychology, Hispanic studies, economics, fine arts, multi-disciplinary studies, classical civilization, German, and sociology. All of the students who were honored at this year’s recognition ceremony have a grade point average of 3.93 or higher.

“This is an amazing group of young people from most of the departments in the college, who have an interesting and imaginative variety of post-graduation plans, which highlights the strengths of a good liberal arts education,” said Dr. Angela Thompson, president of the Eastern Carolina Alumni Association of Phi Beta Kappa and ECU assistant professor of history.

To read the full story, go to http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cas/press.cfm.


Montgomery receives Centennial Award for Excellence in Service

Montgomery

Congratulations to Dr. Marianne Montgomery, who received a Centennial Award for Excellence in Service at Wednesday’s Founder’s Day celebration.

Dr. Montgomery joined the English department in 2006. Soon thereafter, she identified a student need and started the English Club. She has served as Faculty Mentor to English Club since 2008–even while she was simultaneously advising the English honor society Sigma Tau Delta. She also works as an advisor and has served as Director of Undergraduate Studies.  She has served on many university committees, including Faculty Senate, Faculty Governance, Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, the Downtown Dialogues in the Humanities committee, the Harriot College Dean search committee, the Department of English Chair’s evaluation committee, and the new University Studies Faculty Oversight Committee–among others. In addition to her membership in these important efforts, she has served as an officer on several committees and is routinely nominated–and often unanimously elected–to positions that show the high regard in which her colleagues hold her.

“Her service to this university has benefited us all,” said Dr. Margaret Bauer, one of Dr. Montgomery’s nominators, “including especially the students for whom we are all here in the first place. Dr. Marianne Montgomery has given so much of herself to ECU.”


English majors, are you looking for a minor? Consider Great Books!

Odysseus and the sirens

A minor in Great Books requires four Great Books seminars and four Great Books electives. Great Books seminars are discussion-based, and most fulfill the humanities Foundations and writing intensive requirements. Great Books classes feel like eighteenth-century salons, in which the big ideas of human nature and culture are identified, discussed, and debated. Our courses are a good fit for many humanities and science majors, but particularly for English majors. We emphasize close reading, and provide a broad intellectual foundation for the texts you read in English courses.

Why is Great Books such a perfect minor for English majors? Because not all great books are written in English, and not all great books are fiction or poetry. Great books are written in many languages and encompass many overlapping disciplines: Literature, History, Philosophy, Classics, Political Science, Psychology, Economics, Sociology, Anthropology, Biology, Physics, and more. Great Books is the one truly multi and interdisciplinary program on campus, drawing from diverse fields, cultures, faculty, and texts.

A Great Books minor will teach you to think critically, to think on your feet while grounding you in the important ideas that have shaped the world in which we live. It will teach you to think independently and collectively. It will prepare you for an increasingly difficult and complex world.

For more information about minoring in Great Books, visit the program website at http://www.ecu.edu/greatbooks/index.cfm or contact program director Dr. Helena Feder at federh@ecu.edu.

 


Welcome to the Big Apple

Gueye

The department extends its congratulations to Dr. Marame Gueye, who has just published a short story entitled “Welcome to the Big Apple” in Transition Magazine. Dr. Gueye will be reading at Harvard Bookstore for the official launch of the issue.

The short story appeared this month in issue 117 of Transition. Transition is a publication of the Hutchins Center at Harvard University and is published three times annually by Indiana University Press. According to the magazine’s website, “Transition is a unique forum for the freshest, most compelling ideas from and about the black world. Since its founding in Uganda in 1961, the magazine has kept apace of the rapid transformation of the African Diaspora and has remained a leading forum of intellectual debate. Now, in an age that demands ceaseless improvisation, we aim to be both an anchor of deep reflection on black life and a map charting new routes through the globalized world.”

Dr. Gueye teaches African and African Diaspora Literatures, African Women’s Verbal Art, World Literatures, Global Women’s Literatures, Multicultural and Transnational Literatures, Immigration Studies, and Translation Studies at East Carolina.

 


Celebrate Shakespeare’s Birthday!

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The winners of the Shakespearean Sonnet Contest will be recognized Thursday afternoon as part of a celebration of Shakespeare’s birthday.

Festivities will begin at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, April 23, outside Joyner Library with a short performance of a Shakespeare scene by ECU theatre players. The celebration will then move to the Faulkner Gallery on the second floor of the library, where the winners of the sonnet contest will be honored around 3 p.m. At the university level, Ian Lynch took first place and Tyler Holt won second.

Dr. David Wilson-Okamura will deliver a 10-minute presentation on “The Art of Shakespeare’s Sonnets” as part of the festivities and the winners (including two high school students) will read their work aloud or have it read.

Refreshments will be served.


Work in Progress: Update on the Texas Czech Legacy Project and the Archives of an Unknown American Czech Scholar

Dr. Lida Cope

Please join the department today at noon in Bate 2024 for Dr. Lida Cope’s talk entitled “Work in Progress: Update on the Texas Czech Legacy Project and the Archives of an Unknown American Czech Scholar.”

Texas Czech, an endangered diasporic dialect of Czech, is on the brink of extinction, making its documentation paramount. The Texas Czech Legacy Project at the University of Texas at Austin represents collaborative effort of scholars from UT and East Carolina University. The Project’s ultimate goal is to document and preserve the dying Texas Czech dialect (in its Oral Archive) and make available various artifacts representing the Texas Czech community’s linguistic and ethnocultural heritage (in its Visual Archive).

Dr. Cope will introduce the Project’s digital Oral Archive and sample its benefits for the community, education, and research. For those already familiar with her work, she will review the most recent developments as we continue building the TCLP and its archive. She will also highlight the contribution of one of the American Czech folklorists and sociolinguists, Svatava Pirkova Jakobson, whose work is an essential part of this digital repository.

Dr. Cope’s talk is part of the Faculty Speaker Series.


An Evening with Author Amy Stewart

Stewart

As part of Earth Day 2015 events, the Department of English has helped to bring best-selling author Amy Stewart to campus. Stewart, author of The Drunken Botanist, Wicked Plants, Wicked Bugs, and Flower Confidential, will speak at 8 p.m. April 21 in C307 in the Science and Technology Building.

Stewart is a dynamic and engaging speaker whose books focus on the positive and negative impacts of the natural world on people. Her topics have relevance to scientists, gardeners, and cocktail-lovers everywhere. Books will be available to buy, and a reception and book signing will follow the talk.

This event is a signature North Carolina Science Festival event. Funding is provided by the North Carolina Science Festival, UNC System, and East Carolina University through the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Biology, Chemistry Department, English Department, and Center for Sustainability: Tourism, Natural Resources, and the Built Environment.