Department of English News

Welcome to the Big Apple

Gueye

The department extends its congratulations to Dr. Marame Gueye, who has just published a short story entitled “Welcome to the Big Apple” in Transition Magazine. Dr. Gueye will be reading at Harvard Bookstore for the official launch of the issue.

The short story appeared this month in issue 117 of Transition. Transition is a publication of the Hutchins Center at Harvard University and is published three times annually by Indiana University Press. According to the magazine’s website, “Transition is a unique forum for the freshest, most compelling ideas from and about the black world. Since its founding in Uganda in 1961, the magazine has kept apace of the rapid transformation of the African Diaspora and has remained a leading forum of intellectual debate. Now, in an age that demands ceaseless improvisation, we aim to be both an anchor of deep reflection on black life and a map charting new routes through the globalized world.”

Dr. Gueye teaches African and African Diaspora Literatures, African Women’s Verbal Art, World Literatures, Global Women’s Literatures, Multicultural and Transnational Literatures, Immigration Studies, and Translation Studies at East Carolina.

 


Celebrate Shakespeare’s Birthday!

Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 8.40.16 AM

The winners of the Shakespearean Sonnet Contest will be recognized Thursday afternoon as part of a celebration of Shakespeare’s birthday.

Festivities will begin at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, April 23, outside Joyner Library with a short performance of a Shakespeare scene by ECU theatre players. The celebration will then move to the Faulkner Gallery on the second floor of the library, where the winners of the sonnet contest will be honored around 3 p.m. At the university level, Ian Lynch took first place and Tyler Holt won second.

Dr. David Wilson-Okamura will deliver a 10-minute presentation on “The Art of Shakespeare’s Sonnets” as part of the festivities and the winners (including two high school students) will read their work aloud or have it read.

Refreshments will be served.


Work in Progress: Update on the Texas Czech Legacy Project and the Archives of an Unknown American Czech Scholar

Dr. Lida Cope

Please join the department today at noon in Bate 2024 for Dr. Lida Cope’s talk entitled “Work in Progress: Update on the Texas Czech Legacy Project and the Archives of an Unknown American Czech Scholar.”

Texas Czech, an endangered diasporic dialect of Czech, is on the brink of extinction, making its documentation paramount. The Texas Czech Legacy Project at the University of Texas at Austin represents collaborative effort of scholars from UT and East Carolina University. The Project’s ultimate goal is to document and preserve the dying Texas Czech dialect (in its Oral Archive) and make available various artifacts representing the Texas Czech community’s linguistic and ethnocultural heritage (in its Visual Archive).

Dr. Cope will introduce the Project’s digital Oral Archive and sample its benefits for the community, education, and research. For those already familiar with her work, she will review the most recent developments as we continue building the TCLP and its archive. She will also highlight the contribution of one of the American Czech folklorists and sociolinguists, Svatava Pirkova Jakobson, whose work is an essential part of this digital repository.

Dr. Cope’s talk is part of the Faculty Speaker Series.


An Evening with Author Amy Stewart

Stewart

As part of Earth Day 2015 events, the Department of English has helped to bring best-selling author Amy Stewart to campus. Stewart, author of The Drunken Botanist, Wicked Plants, Wicked Bugs, and Flower Confidential, will speak at 8 p.m. April 21 in C307 in the Science and Technology Building.

Stewart is a dynamic and engaging speaker whose books focus on the positive and negative impacts of the natural world on people. Her topics have relevance to scientists, gardeners, and cocktail-lovers everywhere. Books will be available to buy, and a reception and book signing will follow the talk.

This event is a signature North Carolina Science Festival event. Funding is provided by the North Carolina Science Festival, UNC System, and East Carolina University through the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Biology, Chemistry Department, English Department, and Center for Sustainability: Tourism, Natural Resources, and the Built Environment.


EGSO

The Annual ECU English Graduate Student Conference is taking place this Saturday, April 18th in Bate Building. The day begins with a meet-and-greet breakfast from 9-9:30 a.m. Graduate student presenters and presentations are as follows:

10 a.m. – 11 a.m. – “Wrecking the Southern Design: Faulkner’s Destruction of Heteronormativity in Absalom, Absalom! by Justin Littlefield & A Textual Analysis of Donne’s Work by Danielle Lake

11:05 a.m. – 12:05 p.m. – “Cemetery Rhetoric: Interpreting the Legacy of East Carolina University Founders” by Rexford Rose, Ed Reges, Suzan Flanagan

1:05 p.m. -2:05 p.m. – “Once Upon a Time” by Abby Morris, Shane Combs, Kristi Wiley

2:10 p.m. – 3:10 p.m. – Creative Writing Panel by Tim Buchanan, Jazzy Cambra, Brianne Holmes

3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. – “What Makes a Good Cover Design? Visual Representation and Intertextuality in Book Covers” by Janine Butler & “The American Settlement House Movement: At the Nexus of Isms” by Greg​ Orme


Coriolanus!

An interdisciplinary colloquium on Corliolanus will be 3-6 p.m. Wednesday, April 22, in Faulkner Gallery in Joyner Library. Several speakers from the Department of English will be featured:

  • Thomas Herron will discuss “Famine and Rebellion: Contemporary Political Contexts for Shakespeare’s Coriolanus (c. 1608)” at 4:30 p.m.
  • Sean Morris will give a presentation entitled “Tragedy and Satire in Shakespeare’s Corliolanus” at 4:50 p.m.
  • Anna Froula will speak on “Ralph Fiennes’ film Coriolanus” at 5:10 p.m.

 

Coriolanus colloquium flier


Johnson presents NNEST award

Johnson, Burri, and Hansen-Thomas

Mark D. Johnson of East Carolina University (left) and Holly Hansen-Thomas of Texas Woman’s University (right) presented Michael Burri of Wollongong University (center) with the TESOL Award for an Outstanding Paper on Non-Native English-speaking teacher (NNEST) Issues at the 2015 TESOL convention in Toronto. (Photo by Kyle Perler for TESOL International Association)

English department assistant professor Mark D. Johnson, along with Holly Hansen-Thomas of Texas Woman’s University, presented Michael Burri with the TESOL Award for an Outstanding Paper on Non-Native English-Speaking Teacher (NNEST) Issues at the 2015 TESOL convention in Toronto. Each year, East Carolina University’s English department donates $250 to the recipient of the award.

This year’s recipient, Michael Burri, is a PhD student at Wollongong University in Australia. Burri’s paper, titled Exploring the Development of NNEST Cognition about Pronunciation Pedagogy, examined the changing beliefs of five non-native English-speaking teachers of English regarding pronunciation and how it is taught to learners of English as a second language. Burri presented this paper as part of his dissertation research.


EGSO Conference

On April 18th the English Graduate Student Organization (EGSO) will host its fifth annual conference! For the first time, this conference will be open to undergraduates as well. Attached below are a few more details. We hope you will come out to support our participating students and their work!

 


EGSO Haiku Death Match II

The first EGSO sponsored Haiku Death Match of the year took place last February and was visited with enough success to warrant offering a second match on the 17th of this month. If all goes according to plan, this event will take place the day before the EGSO Student Research Conference this year. EGSO still needs volunteers to participate as either judges or contestants.

Haiku Death Match 1a Haiku Death Match 1c Haiku Death Match 1b

If you’re interested in putting your haiku-writing skills to the test, rating your colleagues’ abilities, or simply watching contestants struggle to speed-write haikus on audience-selected topics, you won’t want to miss it. (There will even be a trophy for the winner!​) If you’d like to be a contestant or a judge, contact Danielle Lake at laked13@students.ecu.edu. We hope to see you there.