Department of English News

Literary reading at art museum

Amber Flora Thomas

Amber Flora Thomas

ECU’s Creative Writing Department will present readings from poet and assistant professor Amber Flora Thomas, and five graduate students, from 3 to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, April 3, at the Greenville Museum of Art.


A reading on a Sci-Fi director’s work

Anna Froula

Anna Froula

The body of work of Sci-Fi filmmaker Terry Gilliam will be the focus of the third talk in the Faculty Speaker series, featuring assistant professor Anna Froula.

Froula, associate editor of ECU’s ”Cinema Journal,”  the journal of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies, will read excerpts from the book, “The Cinema of Terry Gilliam: It’s a Mad World,” at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 4, at Bate 1001.

If you have a yen to discuss Sci-Fi and fantasy fare with kindred film buffs, or you just want to explore a new genre with an emphasis on an “outsider” filmmaker known for delivering movies with a satirical edge, come and learn more. Good conversation and eats are free.


Contemporary Writers Series Presents Sherman Alexie

Picture of Sherman Alexie
Native American writer Sherman Alexie will speak in Wright Auditorium on March 26, 2013, 8:00 PM in Wright Auditorium as part of the Contemporary Writers Series.

Sherman Alexie has received numerous awards for his work, including the National Book Award for The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, the PEN/Hemingway Award for The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, and the PEN/Faulkner Award for War Dances.

 


Faculty Speaker Series Continues

The novel, "Sula," by  Toni Morrison (pictured) will be discussed at the Faculty Speaker Series at 4:30 p.m. March 21.

The novel, “Sula,” by Toni Morrison (pictured) will be discussed at the Faculty Speaker Series at 4:30 p.m. March 21.

English instructor Erika Galluppi will discuss the “silence prophet” aspects of Shadrack, a character in Toni Morrison’s novel, “Sula,” by “going around the world … tracing his origins from Cassandra in classic Greek mythology to Septimus in Virginia Woolf’s “Mrs. Dalloway,” and Pays in Ousmane Sembene’s African film, “Camp de Thiaroye.”

Galluppi’s talk, titled “Cassandra ‘Pays it Forward’: Tracing Toni Morrison’s Shadrack as “silenced prophet” from Greek mythology to Virginia Woolf and Ousmane Sembene” is the second in the free series of Faculty Speaker events. It will be held at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 21, in Bates Room 1001.

Good conversation is promised, accompanied by snacks and beverages.


Applewhite’s poetry inspires multimedia art show

Applewhite

City Art Gallery’s opening night exhibit of an art show based on the poetry of well-known North Carolina poet James Applewhite attracted attendees who viewed works created by artists with ties to East Carolina University.
Photo courtesy of The Arts Connection

Three poems penned by renowned North Carolina poet James Applewhite served as the muse for the creation of more than 20 artworks recently displayed at City Art Gallery in Greenville. The February event marked the third annual James Applewhite Poetry Invitational Reception.

The poems, “Reading the Science News,” “Hemlock Hill,” and “Written Beside Bass Lake” inspired paintings, ceramics, sculpture and mixed media. At last  month’s opening reception, Applewhite read the poems aloud. The opening drew a good turnout, said Jaclyn Morgan of the gallery.  The event was hosted by the gallery and the North Carolina Literary Review, a publication of East Carolina University and the N.C. Literary and Historical Association. Applewhite is a frequent contributor to the literary review.

ECU faculty contributing works to the show included Mike Dorsey, Seo Eo, Hanna Jubran, and Jeff Kiefer. Work by graduate student Sally Sutton also was shown. Artists included alumni Richard Fennell, Jeff Kiefer, Michael Knoch, and Bob Rankin, as well as art from the estate of former faculty member Paul Hartley.

 

 

 

 

 


ECU’s Whichard Professor to Give Public Lecture

Image of Gary Stringer
Dr. Gary A. Stringer
, scholar of English Renaissance Literature and visiting professor at East Carolina University, will give a free, public lecture at 7 p.m., Feb. 7, in room 1031 of the Bate Building. He will discuss “The Making of the 1633, ‘Poems, by J. D. with Elegies on the Author’s Death,’ An Illustrated Detective Story.” A reception will follow in the foyer of the Bate Building.

http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cas/articles/gstringer.cfm

 


3rd Annual James Applewhite Poetry Invitational

James Applewhite ReadingThe North Carolina Literary Review and City Art Gallery are hosting the 3rd Annual James Applewhite Poetry Invitational Reception on February 8 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. The works will remain on display until March 3.

For this event, artists submit various multimedia works based on the poems of Dr. Applewhite, a frequent contributor to NCLR and a winner of the North Carolina Award for Literature, as well as an inductee into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame.


10th Annual TESOL /Applied Linguistics Graduate Students (TALGS) Conference Information

The TALGS Conference will be held on Saturday, February 16, 2013, at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. Register on the TALGS website: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cas/engl/talgs/registration.cfm. 
Come to hear our keynote speaker, Dr. Charlene Polio, and attend a variety of paper, discussion and workshop presentations.
On-site registration will be available. Free lunch will be served. Continuing education credits will be offered.All info you may need, including the conference schedule, appears on our website : http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cas/engl/talgs.

Dr. Will Brooker (Dr. Batman) discusses the Dark Knight at public lecture

On Wednesday, October 24th, Dr. Will Brooker delivered his talk “Tales of the Dark Knight: Batman as Mosaic, Myth and Folk Hero” to a standing room audience of faculty, students, comic book fans, and other community members at the Greenville Art Museum.

Dr. Brooker discussed how Batman has become a kind of folk figure or cultural icon, rather than simply a commercial corporate character, and that many recent Batman stories self-consciously reflect on this idea that he’s an urban myth, taking different forms to different people at different times.

Dr. Brooker is Head of Film and TV research at Kingston University, London. He is the author/editor of 8 books and is the incoming editor of Cinema Journal, the top refereed journal in the field of film, television and media studies.

Fans line up to talk with Dr. Brooker. (photo by Amanda Klein)

Dr. Batman trades Gotham for Greenville