Author Archives: John Stevens

Laura Levi Altstaedter to serve on the CAEP volunteer corps


Professor Laura Levi Altstaedter was nominated by The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) to represent it as a volunteer with the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), which appointed her as a Site Visitor. Prof. Levi Altstaedter has served for some time as lead reviewer for the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation.

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The mission of the CAEP and its site visitors is to advance excellence in teacher education by providing evidence-based accreditation to assure the quality of programs and their continuous improvement. It serves more than 900 institutions that offer accredited programs in teacher education.

Students honored by Phi Beta Kappa Chapter of Eastern NC

PhiBetaKappaThe Eastern Carolina Alumni Association of Phi Beta Kappa honored five students from the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at the spring recognition ceremony hosted by the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences. Each student had a grade point average in excess of 3.93:

Erin Cottrell (Psychology and Hispanic Studies)
Sara Kurtz (Fine Arts and Hispanic Studies)
MacKenzie Alyn Mull (Hispanic Studies and Elementary Education)
Jessica Rassau (Classical Civilization)
Sara Sipe (Chemistry and German)

Phi-Beta-Kappa

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(left Sara Sipe, middle Jessie Rassau, right MacKenzie Mull)

» HCAS News Story

‘Entire streets’ of Roman London uncovered in the City

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An archaeological dig in the heart of the City “will transform our understanding” of Roman London, experts claim. About 10,000 finds have been discovered, including writing tablets and good luck charms.
The area has been dubbed the “Pompeii of the north” due to the perfect preservation of organic artefacts such as leather and wood. One expert said: “This is the site that we have been dreaming of for 20 years.”

» Read more

Purificación Martínez and John Given honored for their service to faculty governance

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Profs. Martínez and Given were awarded medallions in honor of their leadership and significant contributions to ECU shared governance, on the occasion of the Faculty Senate’s 50th anniversary. There were 74 medallions awarded, including to all past chairs of the faculty as well as present and past faculty, staff and administrators who have helped shape the ECU system of shared governance. They were presented by Prof. Andrew Morehead, current Chair of the Faculty, at a reception hosted by the Chancellor on March 30,2015.

Prof. Puri Martínez has been the past Chair of the Faculty Governance Committee, and served for many years as Faculty Marshall. She has also been past president of the NC AAUP Faculty Conference, Vice-Chair of the AAUP Assembly of State Conferences, and through it a national leader in helping programs in danger of elimination. She has also been ECU delegate to the UNC Faculty Assembly, and has served on a great many UNC system initiatives and committees. Prof. John Given, current Vice-Chair of the Faculty, has been a member of the University Budget Committee and the University Committee on Fiscal Sustainability, which have advised the Chancellor on ways to respond to the university’s ongoing fiscal constraints.

New Books by FLL Faculty

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Benjamin Fraser, Toward an Urban Cultural Studies (Palgrave McMillan series in Hispanic Urban Studies). Blending Urban Studies and Cultural Studies, this book grounds readers in the extensive theory of the prolific French philosopher Henri Lefebvre. Appropriate for both beginners and specialists, the first half of this book builds from a general introduction to Lefebvre and his methodological contribution toward a focus on the concept of urban alienation and his underexplored theory of the work of art. The second half merges Lefebvrian urban thought with literary studies, film studies and popular music studies, successively, before turning to the videogame and the digital humanities. Benjamin Fraser’s approach consistently emphasizes the interrelationship between cities, culture, and capital.

TwarkSocialJustice
Jill Twark, ed., Envisioning Social Justice in Contemporary German Culture (Camden House Studies in German Literature, Linguistics, and Culture). Social-injustice dilemmas such as poverty, unemployment, and racism are subjects of continuing debate in European societies and in Germany in particular, as solutions are difficult and progress often comes slowly. Such discussions are not limited to opposing newspaper editorials, position papers, or legislative forums, however; creative works expound on these topics as well, but their contributions to the debate are often marginalized.
This collection of new essays explores how contemporary German-language literary, dramatic, filmic, musical, and street artists are grappling with social-justice issues that affect Germany and the wider world, surveying more than a decade’s worth of works of German literature and art in light of the recent paradigm shift in cultural criticism called the “ethical turn.” Central themes include the legacy of the politically engaged 1968 generation, eastern Germany and the process of unification, widening economic disparity as a result of political policies and recession, and problems of integration and inclusivity for ethnic and religious minorities as migration to Germany has increased.

Contributors: Monika Albrecht, Olaf Berwald, Robert Blankenship, Laurel Cohen-Pfister, Jack Davis, Bastian Heinsohn, Axel Hildebrandt, Deborah Janson, Karolin Machtans, Ralf Remshardt, Alexandra Simon-López, Patricia Anne Simpson, Maria Stehle, Jill E. Twark.

April 14, 2015. German Film: Lola Rennt. Bate 1009, 5-8pm.

Hosted by German 2 students, Emily and Felicia!

–CRAFT DAY
Sunday, 19 April, beginning at 5:30 p.m. and then again on Wednesday, 22 April at the same time.
German club members will be meeting at Anthony Razov’s place to make
crafts for sale. All proceeds will go to support German Club
(did I mention we’re planning events already for next year–including OKTOBERFEST)?
Come lend a hand.
Email Anthony for address/directions:
razova14@students.ecu.edu

Next Week

–FUNDRAISING (Crafts and German books–for learners of all levels)
Volunteers need to help raise money for German Club by staffing a table featuring
crafts and German-language books for sale.
Thursday, 23 April, 9am-3pm at Wright Plaza
Contact Anthony to volunteer: razova14@students.ecu.edu

–FACTORY TOUR
Interested in touring a local German-owned and operated company,
in this case PAS GmbH (Providing Appliance Solutions Corporation)?:
Tuesday, April 28th, from 10:15 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The maximum number of participants is six students.
Contact Dr. Jill Twark at twarkj@ecu.edu if you are interested in going!

April 8, 2015. Inaugural Lecture of an ECU Classical Student Association

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Classical Studies Association
Inaugural meeting -April 8, 2015
Presentation by Dr. Anthony Papalas

We began the night with a presentation on “The Ionian Rebellion” by Dr. Anthony Papalas. To show his support for Classical curriculum, and in particular to the CSA itself, Dr. Papalas stated that “This meeting serves as a statement to people that trivialize the humanities.” He described the importance of a Classical education in today’s society. In past generations, Classics received much admiration and praise. It was pretty standard for college students to receive some sort of Classical training while at school. Now, however, it is not that popular. But that doesn’t mean that Classics in not relevant in today’s world. A degree in Classics shows prospective employers and professional schools that the applicant is dedicated and studious. It is also one of the top degrees that acclaimed law schools look for in applicants.
After this, Dr. Papalas lectured on the Ionian Rebellion. To help lay the groundwork for his argument, Dr. Papalas emphasized the culture and history of Ionia, the area centrally located on the western shore of Asia Minor. Greek cities located in Asia Minor are some of the best preserved sites for archaeology, even compared to those of European Greece. Also, many of the first great Greek thinkers and innovators were from Ionia. Around 500 B.C., the Ionians revolted against their ruler, the king of Persia, of which they had been made a part for 50 years. Dr. Papalas explained the various reasons for the rebellion, and the malicious role of Aristagoras in causing Ionian-Persian tensions. Nevertheless, the rebellion took hold and played a decisive role in the evolution of democracy, since the new weapon of the moment, the trireme, was so manpower-intensive that it necessitated a “peoples’ war” and led to the rise of democratic regimes. Once the war reached a stand-still, a decisive naval battle at Lade was forced, to end the revolt. The Persians won decisively, and this rebellion created harsh conditions between the Persians and Greeks, a fact that would plague the two nations for the next half century in the Greco-Persian Wars.

submitted with our thanks by Jacob Parks