Category Archives: Classics News

Charles Fantazzi et al. edd., Brill’s Companion to the Neo-Latin World

Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World. Brill Publishers, Leiden, 2014.

Edited by Philip Ford (†), Jan Bloemendal and Charles Fantazzi
CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014
Library Journal Best Print Reference Selection 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and broad cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this 800,000 word two-volume work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available ONLINE.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacré, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.

David Wilson-Okamura, winner of the 2016 MacCaffrey Prize

The Spenser Review

2016 MacCaffrey Prize

The winner of the 2016 MacCaffrey Prize was David Wilson-Okamura, for Spenser’s International Style (Cambridge University Press, 2013). In the words of the selection committee:

“Spenser’s International Style ushers the reader into a virtual drawing room where the great literary stylists and theorists of style from a 1500-year span of European history are engaged in vigorous discussion on a range of formal matters. Cicero and Quintilian, Tasso and Du Bellay, Harvey and Harington are just a few of the more vocal guests in this lively parliament of style, and their discourse ranges from sound and ornament to rhythm and meter, from figures of speech to genre. Wilson-Okamura functions as universal translator, rendering intricate technical discussions from multiple centuries and languages into highly accessible—even colloquial—modern English prose. With polish and precision, Wilson-Okamura leads us through the major stylistic influences on Spenser, but, more significantly, through Spenser’s eclectic but original response to those influences: The book is about Spenser’s style, but is itself written with verve and in its chic casual style recalls the opinionated voices of critics such as C.S. Lewis. (“His prosody was no less bold than his politics: stanzas he managed in an English way, rhythm in a Tuscan way, rhyme in a French way… . his style was international but Spenser himself was always independent” [221].) No matter what a critic’s current theoretical interest may be—ecocriticism, feminism, queer studies—it is a book in which she will find important and always useful readings for the classroom.”

Foreign Language Course Renumbering, starting Fall 2016

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures has renumbered a large number of courses to comply with evolving university expectations for course level content and enrollment expectations. This may cause some difficulty for current students seeking courses under the old numbers to meet Catalog requirements before fall 2016. We apologize for any inconvenience and will maintain this list during the transition.

Old number (to new number):
CHIN 1003 (to 2003)
CHIN 1004 (to 2004)
FREN 1003 (to 2003)
FREN 1004 (to 2004)
FREN 2108 (to 3001)
FREN 2330 (to 3002)
FREN 3555 (to 4555)
FREN 3556 (to 4556)
FREN 3557 (to 4557)
FREN 3558 (to 4558)
FREN 3560 (to 4560)
GERM 1003 (to 2003)
GERM 1004 (to 2004)
GERM 2210 (to 3001)
GERM 2211 (to 3002)
GERM 2300 (to 3510)
GERM 2420 (to 3420)
GERM 3350 (to 4000)
GERM 3520 (to 4520)
GERM 3530 (to 4530)
GERM 3540 (to 4540)
GERM 3550 (to 4550)
GRK 1003 (to 2003)
GRK 1004 (to 2004)
ITAL 1003 (to 2003)
ITAL 1004 (to 2004)
JAPN 1003 (to 2003)
JAPN 1004 (to 2004)
LATN 1003 (to 2003)
LATN 1004 (to 2004)
RUSS 1003 (to 2003)
RUSS 1004 (to 2004)
SPAN 1003 (to 2003)
SPAN 1004 (to 2004)
SPAN 2222 (to 3001)
SPAN 2330 (to 3002)
SPAN 2440 (to 3440)
SPAN 2441 (to 3441)
SPAN 2550 (to 3550)
SPAN 3330 (to 3210)
SPAN 3225 (to 3325)
SPAN 3340 (to 4140)

Faculty Author Book Awards

Books2015lgFive FLL Faculty were recognized for the book publications during 2014-2015 (from left to right):

Frédéric Fladenmuller. Proust ou l’écriture inversive. Du temps perdu au temps retrouvé. Currents in Comparative Romance Languages and Literatures, v. 226. Peter Lang.

Steven Cerutti. Cicero’s Pro Archia Poeta Oratio. Bolchazy-Carducci. 3rd AP edition.

Jill Twark. Envisioning Social Justice in Contemporary German Culture. Studies in German Literature, Linguistics, and Culture. Camden House.

John Given. The Fragmentary History of Priskos of Panion: Attila, the Huns and the Romans, AD 430-476. Christian Roman Empire Vol. 11. Arx Publishing.

Ben Fraser. Antonio López García’s Everyday Urban Worlds: A Philosophy of Painting. Bucknell University Press.

» Joyner Library Blog post

Innovation in Digital Humanities in CLAS 4000

CLAS4000DHPmed

Prof. Marylaura Papalas and her students created an interactive digital humanities website, as part of their spring 2015 course, CLAS 4000, Seminar in the Classics, on “Modern Greek Identities.” Prof. Papalas used the “Story Map Journal” application in ArcGIS online by Esri.

Why_I_Killed-front
It presents an interactive map of Athens, with links and readings related to Amanda Michalopoulou’s 2003 novel, Why I Killed My Best Friend. The website was designed by Prof. Papalas. A majority of the contributions are from Jessica Rassau, who provided all the text. Jessica Rassau, Cameron Gross, and Brittany Cox contributed the voice recordings. Morgan Bridgers and Brianna Shugrue, along with the others, contributed to class discussions of the novel that culminated in the production of this website.

CLAS 4000 Spring 2015

Students honored by Phi Beta Kappa Chapter of Eastern NC

PhiBetaKappaThe Eastern Carolina Alumni Association of Phi Beta Kappa honored five students from the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at the spring recognition ceremony hosted by the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences. Each student had a grade point average in excess of 3.93:

Erin Cottrell (Psychology and Hispanic Studies)
Sara Kurtz (Fine Arts and Hispanic Studies)
MacKenzie Alyn Mull (Hispanic Studies and Elementary Education)
Jessica Rassau (Classical Civilization)
Sara Sipe (Chemistry and German)

Phi-Beta-Kappa

pbk201530lg

(left Sara Sipe, middle Jessie Rassau, right MacKenzie Mull)

» HCAS News Story

‘Entire streets’ of Roman London uncovered in the City

RomanLondonDig

An archaeological dig in the heart of the City “will transform our understanding” of Roman London, experts claim. About 10,000 finds have been discovered, including writing tablets and good luck charms.
The area has been dubbed the “Pompeii of the north” due to the perfect preservation of organic artefacts such as leather and wood. One expert said: “This is the site that we have been dreaming of for 20 years.”

» Read more

Purificación Martínez and John Given honored for their service to faculty governance

JGPuri2015

Profs. Martínez and Given were awarded medallions in honor of their leadership and significant contributions to ECU shared governance, on the occasion of the Faculty Senate’s 50th anniversary. There were 74 medallions awarded, including to all past chairs of the faculty as well as present and past faculty, staff and administrators who have helped shape the ECU system of shared governance. They were presented by Prof. Andrew Morehead, current Chair of the Faculty, at a reception hosted by the Chancellor on March 30,2015.

Prof. Puri Martínez has been the past Chair of the Faculty Governance Committee, and served for many years as Faculty Marshall. She has also been past president of the NC AAUP Faculty Conference, Vice-Chair of the AAUP Assembly of State Conferences, and through it a national leader in helping programs in danger of elimination. She has also been ECU delegate to the UNC Faculty Assembly, and has served on a great many UNC system initiatives and committees. Prof. John Given, current Vice-Chair of the Faculty, has been a member of the University Budget Committee and the University Committee on Fiscal Sustainability, which have advised the Chancellor on ways to respond to the university’s ongoing fiscal constraints.