Category Archives: News by Language

Katherine Ford Selected as Honors Faculty Fellow for 2014-15

Katie FordDr. Katherine Ford, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies, has been selected as an Honors Faculty Fellow for 2014-15. Honors Faculty Fellows teach upper division Honors Students, leading Colloquia in Leadership and Service, in Research, Capstone Experiences and Honors Seminars. They also perform advising for scholarship and fellowship students. Dr. Ford is author of a monograph on Politics and Violence in Cuban and Argentine Theater (Palgrave McMillan 2010), as well as numerous articles on Hispanic drama.

January 21, 2015 News and Study Abroad Deadlines

Dear friends of ECU’s program in German,

A new semester is upon us and in full swing; with that in mind, our weekly email (in digest form) has resumed. I’ll generally send out the email every Sunday with a listing of upcoming events and opportunities related to German Studies at ECU. (Ausnahmsweise bekommen Sie diese E-mail erst heute.)

Several film showings are listed below; more are on the way, as is a schedule of German Club meetings and events.
Students, if you have ideas for activities or films you would like to help plan, please contact me (Prof. Smith) or another faculty member in German. Our programs exist for and because of you!
Herzliche Grüße
David Smith, Associate Professor of German (smithdav@ecu.edu).
***

SSABerlinSTUDY ABROAD FAIR
Wednesday, 21 January, 1:00pm-3:00 p.m.
Faulkner Gallery of Joyner Library (second floor)
*This fair will feature information about ECU’s offerings, including our Study in Berlin program (please see attachment).

APPLICATION DEADLINE–Study in Berlin!
30/31 January
The application deadline for the Summer Study Abroad program in Berlin is Jan. 30th, with the $300 deposit due on Jan. 31st.
Don’t let questions about course credits or possible funding deter you from applying. Contact Prof. Jones (jonessu@ecu.edu) today to discuss options!
»» Application Link

FILM SCREENINGS (preliminary list)

1. Montag, 2. Februar um 17. 30 Uhr: Das Leben der Anderen (Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, 2006)

2. Donnerstag, 12. Februar um 18 Uhr: Der Untergang (Oliver Hirschbiegel, 2004)

3. Mittwoch, 1. April um 17.30 Uhr: Alles auf Zucker (Dani Levy, 2004)

Breakthrough in reading carbonized Herculaneum Papyri

Researchers have found a key that may unlock the only library of classical antiquity to survive along with its documents, raising at least a possibility of recovering vanished works of ancient Greek and Roman authors such as the lost books of Livy’s history of Rome.

The library is that of a villa in Herculaneum, a town that was destroyed in A.D. 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius that obliterated nearby Pompeii. Though Pompeii was engulfed by lava, a mix of superhot gases and ash swept over Herculaneum, preserving the documents in a grand villa that probably belonged to the family of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, the father-in-law of Julius Caesar.

Researchers led by Vito Mocella, of the Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems in Naples, Italy, now say that for the first time, they can read letters inside the scrolls without unrolling them. Using a laserlike beam of X-rays from the European Synchrotron in Grenoble, France, they were able to pick up the very slight contrast between the carbonized papyrus fibers and the ancient ink, soot-based and also made of carbon.

»» Read more

“Why everyone should learn the ancient languages,” Roger Kimball, editor of The New Criterion, November 2014.

The New Criterion

The Yale classicist Donald Kagan writes about Sir James Headlam-Morley, the man who occupied the position of Historical Adviser to the British Foreign Office in the 1920s. Headlam-Morley was a fount of good advice about all manner of strategic issues, not least the threat of German militarism. Headlam-Morley’s deep acquaintance with the past allowed him to predict the future with a gimlet-eyed clarity that, unfortunately for the world, most of those charged with steering the ship of state in the post-World War I years lacked. Headlam-Morley, Professor Kagan observes, was “a man with the only proper training for an expert in almost any field of human endeavor, but especially for the conduct of foreign policy and diplomacy: I mean, of course, Classical Studies.”

We smiled when we read that, too. The “of course” was especially nice. A more charming example of disciplinary chauvinism would be hard to find. Except that it is more than disciplinary chauvinism. It is also the simple, pragmatic truth.

»» Full article called “The Latin Vote” in The New Criterion

Cliff Robinson, first ECU Alumn to complete a PhD in Classics.

Cliff, shown here as winner of Duke’s 2014 Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, successfully defended his dissertation on November 20, 2014 at Duke on “The Longest Transference: Self-Consolation and Politics in Latin Philosophical Literature.” Cliff graduated from ECU in English, Philosophy and Classics in 2007. He is currently a Visiting Instructor at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.

»» @ Academia.edu

December 5, 2014. 12pm. Dr. Gregory E. Moreland, University of Florida. “Certificate in Spanish for the Professions: (Re)Invigorating the Foreign Language Curriculum”

Spanish professionsIn response to the ever-changing environment surrounding the study of foreign language(s) at the university level, and in an effort to meet student demand for interdisciplinary courses, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies (SPS) at the University of Florida recently introduced a new Certificate in Spanish for the Professions. Early results are quite promising, and this could serve as a model for other institutions interested in boosting enrollments in a wide variety of languages. In this presentation, Dr. Gregory E. Moreland, University of Florida, Undergraduate Coordinator in Spanish and Director of their Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum (FLAC) program, will describe the climate in which this Certificate was developed, outline its place within the broader Spanish curriculum, and speculate on prospects for the future. Audience participation is strongly encouraged.