Category Archives: Italian News

Foreign Language Course Renumbering, starting Fall 2016

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures has renumbered a large number of courses to comply with evolving university expectations for course level content and enrollment expectations. This may cause some difficulty for current students seeking courses under the old numbers to meet Catalog requirements before fall 2016. We apologize for any inconvenience and will maintain this list during the transition.

Old number (to new number):
CHIN 1003 (to 2003)
CHIN 1004 (to 2004)
FREN 1003 (to 2003)
FREN 1004 (to 2004)
FREN 2108 (to 3001)
FREN 2330 (to 3002)
FREN 3555 (to 4555)
FREN 3556 (to 4556)
FREN 3557 (to 4557)
FREN 3558 (to 4558)
FREN 3560 (to 4560)
GERM 1003 (to 2003)
GERM 1004 (to 2004)
GERM 2210 (to 3001)
GERM 2211 (to 3002)
GERM 2300 (to 3510)
GERM 2420 (to 3420)
GERM 3350 (to 4000)
GERM 3520 (to 4520)
GERM 3530 (to 4530)
GERM 3540 (to 4540)
GERM 3550 (to 4550)
GRK 1003 (to 2003)
GRK 1004 (to 2004)
ITAL 1003 (to 2003)
ITAL 1004 (to 2004)
JAPN 1003 (to 2003)
JAPN 1004 (to 2004)
LATN 1003 (to 2003)
LATN 1004 (to 2004)
RUSS 1003 (to 2003)
RUSS 1004 (to 2004)
SPAN 1003 (to 2003)
SPAN 1004 (to 2004)
SPAN 2222 (to 3001)
SPAN 2330 (to 3002)
SPAN 2440 (to 3440)
SPAN 2441 (to 3441)
SPAN 2550 (to 3550)
SPAN 3330 (to 3210)
SPAN 3225 (to 3325)
SPAN 3340 (to 4140)

Charles Fantazzi Honored with Festschrift

FantazziDr. Charles E. Fantazzi, Thomas Harriot Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus of Classics and Great Books in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, was presented with Neo-Latin and the Humanities. Essays in Honour of Charles E. Fantazzi at the Renaissance Society of America Conference in New York City, March 28.

The collection of essays, contributed by scholars from the U.S., Canada, Mexico and Europe, were co-edited by Dr. Jonathan Reid, ECU associate professor of Renaissance and Reformation History. The essays resulted from a two-day international symposium on Neo-Latin and the Humanities, which was held in honor of Fantazzi at ECU in February 2011.

“The event was a smashing celebration of Charles and the riches of contemporary Neo-Latin and humanities research,” said Reid. “The papers were excellent. So much so that after the conference, although it had not been the original plan, two presenters, Tim Kircher and Luc Deitz, and I solicited these papers and others from Charles’s colleagues who were not able to attend, to form a festschrift. The result is solid contribution to the field of Neo-Latin studies and a durable mark of the esteem of his colleagues at ECU and across North America and Europe.”

Marc Laureys, of the Universität Bonn in Germany, writes, “This volume is a fitting tribute to the scholarship of Charles Fantazzi. Its eleven excellent articles by renowned scholars in the filed of Neo-Latin philosophy, Renaissance humanism and the history of early modern learning are of extraordinary quality and break new ground in a variety of ways.”

Fantazzi came to ECU in 1998 as The David Julian and Virginia Suther Whichard Distinguished Professor in the Humanities, after retiring from the University of Windsor in 1995, where he served as chair of the Department of Classics (1973-79), chair of the Department of Classical and Modern Languages (1979-82) and was honored as University Professor (1994). During his time at ECU, Fantazzi taught courses in Great Books; Greek and Latin literature; Italian; Italian literature of the Renaissance; Latin literature; and Medieval Latin, before retiring in August 2011.

“Charles is a cheery and arrestingly amiable man, who wears his tremendous learning very lightly, has a ready laugh and is ever eager to help colleagues with difficult passage in Latin, Greek, Italian, French, Spanish and more,” said Reid. “His enthusiasm for everything from Dante’s poetics and Renaissance letters to classical music and the ins and outs (and scandals) of modern Italian politics is infectious.”

» Review in Renaissance Quarterly