Category Archives: Classics News

Innovation in Digital Humanities in CLAS 4000


Prof. Marylaura Papalas and her students created an interactive digital humanities website, as part of their spring 2015 course, CLAS 4000, Seminar in the Classics, on “Modern Greek Identities.” Prof. Papalas used the “Story Map Journal” application in ArcGIS online by Esri.

It presents an interactive map of Athens, with links and readings related to Amanda Michalopoulou’s 2003 novel, Why I Killed My Best Friend. The website was designed by Prof. Papalas. A majority of the contributions are from Jessica Rassau, who provided all the text. Jessica Rassau, Cameron Gross, and Brittany Cox contributed the voice recordings. Morgan Bridgers and Brianna Shugrue, along with the others, contributed to class discussions of the novel that culminated in the production of this website.

CLAS 4000 Spring 2015

Students honored by Phi Beta Kappa Chapter of Eastern NC

PhiBetaKappaThe Eastern Carolina Alumni Association of Phi Beta Kappa honored five students from the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at the spring recognition ceremony hosted by the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences. Each student had a grade point average in excess of 3.93:

Erin Cottrell (Psychology and Hispanic Studies)
Sara Kurtz (Fine Arts and Hispanic Studies)
MacKenzie Alyn Mull (Hispanic Studies and Elementary Education)
Jessica Rassau (Classical Civilization)
Sara Sipe (Chemistry and German)



(left Sara Sipe, middle Jessie Rassau, right MacKenzie Mull)

» HCAS News Story

‘Entire streets’ of Roman London uncovered in the City


An archaeological dig in the heart of the City “will transform our understanding” of Roman London, experts claim. About 10,000 finds have been discovered, including writing tablets and good luck charms.
The area has been dubbed the “Pompeii of the north” due to the perfect preservation of organic artefacts such as leather and wood. One expert said: “This is the site that we have been dreaming of for 20 years.”

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Purificación Martínez and John Given honored for their service to faculty governance


Profs. Martínez and Given were awarded medallions in honor of their leadership and significant contributions to ECU shared governance, on the occasion of the Faculty Senate’s 50th anniversary. There were 74 medallions awarded, including to all past chairs of the faculty as well as present and past faculty, staff and administrators who have helped shape the ECU system of shared governance. They were presented by Prof. Andrew Morehead, current Chair of the Faculty, at a reception hosted by the Chancellor on March 30,2015.

Prof. Puri Martínez has been the past Chair of the Faculty Governance Committee, and served for many years as Faculty Marshall. She has also been past president of the NC AAUP Faculty Conference, Vice-Chair of the AAUP Assembly of State Conferences, and through it a national leader in helping programs in danger of elimination. She has also been ECU delegate to the UNC Faculty Assembly, and has served on a great many UNC system initiatives and committees. Prof. John Given, current Vice-Chair of the Faculty, has been a member of the University Budget Committee and the University Committee on Fiscal Sustainability, which have advised the Chancellor on ways to respond to the university’s ongoing fiscal constraints.

April 8, 2015. Inaugural Lecture of an ECU Classical Student Association


Classical Studies Association
Inaugural meeting -April 8, 2015
Presentation by Dr. Anthony Papalas

We began the night with a presentation on “The Ionian Rebellion” by Dr. Anthony Papalas. To show his support for Classical curriculum, and in particular to the CSA itself, Dr. Papalas stated that “This meeting serves as a statement to people that trivialize the humanities.” He described the importance of a Classical education in today’s society. In past generations, Classics received much admiration and praise. It was pretty standard for college students to receive some sort of Classical training while at school. Now, however, it is not that popular. But that doesn’t mean that Classics in not relevant in today’s world. A degree in Classics shows prospective employers and professional schools that the applicant is dedicated and studious. It is also one of the top degrees that acclaimed law schools look for in applicants.
After this, Dr. Papalas lectured on the Ionian Rebellion. To help lay the groundwork for his argument, Dr. Papalas emphasized the culture and history of Ionia, the area centrally located on the western shore of Asia Minor. Greek cities located in Asia Minor are some of the best preserved sites for archaeology, even compared to those of European Greece. Also, many of the first great Greek thinkers and innovators were from Ionia. Around 500 B.C., the Ionians revolted against their ruler, the king of Persia, of which they had been made a part for 50 years. Dr. Papalas explained the various reasons for the rebellion, and the malicious role of Aristagoras in causing Ionian-Persian tensions. Nevertheless, the rebellion took hold and played a decisive role in the evolution of democracy, since the new weapon of the moment, the trireme, was so manpower-intensive that it necessitated a “peoples’ war” and led to the rise of democratic regimes. Once the war reached a stand-still, a decisive naval battle at Lade was forced, to end the revolt. The Persians won decisively, and this rebellion created harsh conditions between the Persians and Greeks, a fact that would plague the two nations for the next half century in the Greco-Persian Wars.

submitted with our thanks by Jacob Parks

Destruction of Nimrud by Isis

Daily Reflector
By Sharieka Breeden
March 10, 2015

Recent attacks on ancient archeological sites by the Islamic State add a layer of horror atop an already terrible toll inflicted by the terrorist group, East Carolina University Department of Anthropology staff said Monday.

According to The Associated Press, the destruction of the nearly 3,000-year-old city of Nimrud in Iraq is part of the Sunni extremist group’s campaign to enforce its interpretation of Islamic law by purging ancient relics they say promote idolatry.

Reports indicate that the group bulldozed sites at Nimrud on Friday. They also released video of fighters smashing artifacts in the Mosul museum, and explosions and bulldozers hit Hatra, another ancient site near Mosul, on Saturday.


» Read more

AP Stories

ISIS Video of the Destruction

March 21, 2015. NCCA Spring Meeting @ WFU.


9:30 Registration (Parking)

10:00 Maura Heyn, UNCG, Til Death Do Us Join: Provincial Portraiture in the Roman World

10:45  John Stevens, ECU, Doctus Vergil: 11 Lines That Lay the Foundation of Rome

11:30 Business Meeting

12:00 Lunch (Lunch Reservation Form due March 13)

1:00 Rebecca A. Sears, WFU, Musicians, Instruments, and Musical Documents in Roman Egypt

1:45 Robyn Le Blanc, UNC-CH, The Importance of Being Greek: Gods and Heroes in Roman Palestine

March 23-27, 2015. FLL @ Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities Week

Aenia Amin (BA Hispanic Studies)
The Association Between Metabolism and the Expression of Circadian Regulatory Genes (Oral Presentation) 10:15-10:30 MSC Great Room I Biomedical Sciences

Kyle Binaxas (BA Multidisciplinary Studies: Russian Studies)
Soviet Animation Before and After Khrushchev’s Thaw: Historical and Critical Analysis (Poster UP 23) 8:15-12:15 MSC Social Room Social Sciences

Kimberly Bostick (BA Hispanic Studies)
Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Food Insecurity in Obese Pediatric Patients (Poster UP 43) 10:15-2:30 MSC Social Room Human Health

Charles Jauss (BA Hispanic Studies)
Understanding Cultural Self-Efficacy Among Medical Students (Poster UP 35) 10:15-2:30 MSC Social Room Human Health

Jessica Rassau (BA Multidisciplinary Studies: Classical Civilization)
The Training and Decisions of King Leonidas (Oral Presentation) 1:30-1:45 MSC Great Room 2 Social Sciences

Alix Rothbart (Hispanic Studies Minor)
Stress, Burnout and Coping Mechanisms among Health Professionals working in Pediatric Oncology (Poster UP 38) 10:15-2:30 MSC Social Room Human Health

Sarah Sipe (BA German)
Intensity of Amyloid-beta (A) peptides and the exposure of their hydrophobic residues in forming amyloid plaques (Poster UP 98) 8:15-2:30 MSC Room 221 Biomedical Sciences

» 2015 RCAW Program