Category Archives: Classics News

Destruction of Nimrud by Isis

Daily Reflector
By Sharieka Breeden
March 10, 2015

Recent attacks on ancient archeological sites by the Islamic State add a layer of horror atop an already terrible toll inflicted by the terrorist group, East Carolina University Department of Anthropology staff said Monday.

According to The Associated Press, the destruction of the nearly 3,000-year-old city of Nimrud in Iraq is part of the Sunni extremist group’s campaign to enforce its interpretation of Islamic law by purging ancient relics they say promote idolatry.

Reports indicate that the group bulldozed sites at Nimrud on Friday. They also released video of fighters smashing artifacts in the Mosul museum, and explosions and bulldozers hit Hatra, another ancient site near Mosul, on Saturday.

Iraq;_Nimrud_-_Assyria,_Lamassu's_Guarding_Palace_Entrance

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AP Stories

March 21, 2015. NCCA Spring Meeting @ WFU.

SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015
WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY
BENSON 409
WINSTON-SALEM, NC

9:30 Registration (Parking)

10:00 Maura Heyn, UNCG, Til Death Do Us Join: Provincial Portraiture in the Roman World

10:45  John Stevens, ECU, Doctus Vergil: 11 Lines That Lay the Foundation of Rome

11:30 Business Meeting

12:00 Lunch (Lunch Reservation Form due March 13)

1:00 Rebecca A. Sears, WFU, Musicians, Instruments, and Musical Documents in Roman Egypt

1:45 Robyn Le Blanc, UNC-CH, The Importance of Being Greek: Gods and Heroes in Roman Palestine

March 23-27, 2015. FLL @ Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities Week

Aenia Amin (BA Hispanic Studies)
The Association Between Metabolism and the Expression of Circadian Regulatory Genes (Oral Presentation) 10:15-10:30 MSC Great Room I Biomedical Sciences

Kyle Binaxas (BA Multidisciplinary Studies: Russian Studies)
Soviet Animation Before and After Khrushchev’s Thaw: Historical and Critical Analysis (Poster UP 23) 8:15-12:15 MSC Social Room Social Sciences

Kimberly Bostick (BA Hispanic Studies)
Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Food Insecurity in Obese Pediatric Patients (Poster UP 43) 10:15-2:30 MSC Social Room Human Health

Charles Jauss (BA Hispanic Studies)
Understanding Cultural Self-Efficacy Among Medical Students (Poster UP 35) 10:15-2:30 MSC Social Room Human Health

Jessica Rassau (BA Multidisciplinary Studies: Classical Civilization)
The Training and Decisions of King Leonidas (Oral Presentation) 1:30-1:45 MSC Great Room 2 Social Sciences

Alix Rothbart (Hispanic Studies Minor)
Stress, Burnout and Coping Mechanisms among Health Professionals working in Pediatric Oncology (Poster UP 38) 10:15-2:30 MSC Social Room Human Health

Sarah Sipe (BA German)
Intensity of Amyloid-beta (A) peptides and the exposure of their hydrophobic residues in forming amyloid plaques (Poster UP 98) 8:15-2:30 MSC Room 221 Biomedical Sciences

» 2015 RCAW Program

Breakthrough in reading carbonized Herculaneum Papyri

Researchers have found a key that may unlock the only library of classical antiquity to survive along with its documents, raising at least a possibility of recovering vanished works of ancient Greek and Roman authors such as the lost books of Livy’s history of Rome.

The library is that of a villa in Herculaneum, a town that was destroyed in A.D. 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius that obliterated nearby Pompeii. Though Pompeii was engulfed by lava, a mix of superhot gases and ash swept over Herculaneum, preserving the documents in a grand villa that probably belonged to the family of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, the father-in-law of Julius Caesar.

Researchers led by Vito Mocella, of the Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems in Naples, Italy, now say that for the first time, they can read letters inside the scrolls without unrolling them. Using a laserlike beam of X-rays from the European Synchrotron in Grenoble, France, they were able to pick up the very slight contrast between the carbonized papyrus fibers and the ancient ink, soot-based and also made of carbon.

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“Why everyone should learn the ancient languages,” Roger Kimball, editor of The New Criterion, November 2014.

The New Criterion

The Yale classicist Donald Kagan writes about Sir James Headlam-Morley, the man who occupied the position of Historical Adviser to the British Foreign Office in the 1920s. Headlam-Morley was a fount of good advice about all manner of strategic issues, not least the threat of German militarism. Headlam-Morley’s deep acquaintance with the past allowed him to predict the future with a gimlet-eyed clarity that, unfortunately for the world, most of those charged with steering the ship of state in the post-World War I years lacked. Headlam-Morley, Professor Kagan observes, was “a man with the only proper training for an expert in almost any field of human endeavor, but especially for the conduct of foreign policy and diplomacy: I mean, of course, Classical Studies.”

We smiled when we read that, too. The “of course” was especially nice. A more charming example of disciplinary chauvinism would be hard to find. Except that it is more than disciplinary chauvinism. It is also the simple, pragmatic truth.

»» Full article called “The Latin Vote” in The New Criterion

Cliff Robinson, first ECU Alumn to complete a PhD in Classics.

Cliff, shown here as winner of Duke’s 2014 Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, successfully defended his dissertation on November 20, 2014 at Duke on “The Longest Transference: Self-Consolation and Politics in Latin Philosophical Literature.” Cliff graduated from ECU in English, Philosophy and Classics in 2007. He is currently a Visiting Instructor at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.

»» @ Academia.edu

Undergraduate Research Award Winners

JessieRassau2014Jessica Rassau, senior in Classical Studies and the Honors College, has received an Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (URCA) award in the amount of $1,120. She is currently studying abroad in Italy and will use her funds to travel to Greece, where she will further her research in ancient Spartan military culture and Spartan participation in the Persian Wars.

Kyle Binaxas, a double major in Russian Studies/Psychology, has also received an Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (URCA) Award in the amount of $950.00. Dr. Murenina started this undergrad research project with Kyle in Spring 2014 by supervising RUSI 3993 Directed Readings: Aesthetic Choices in Soviet Animation and the Thaw of the 1960s, and recently asked Rick Hernandez (Russian History) to be her mentor for this award competition. We are looking forward to presenting Kyle’s project at The State of NC Undergraduate Research and Creative Symposium (SNCURCS).

The URCA committee received 61 applications, of which they funded 31. Both will be recognized at the URCA awards ceremony on Monday, March 16.