Mar 312015
 

College of Allied Health Sciences alumni and Navy Occupational Therapist Trey Elam is sharing his passion for occupational therapy through a new video developed for medical officers and prospective occupational therapists interested in a career in Navy Medicine.

Produced by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, the video features actual occupational therapy patients acting out occupational therapy treatments, showing the capabilities and services of the Navy Occupational Therapy Program and illustrating the unique role and benefits that Navy Occupational Therapists provide to patients recovering from life altering injuries or illnesses.

Navy Occupational Therapist Trey Elam uses a driving simulator in a treatment session with a patient in the Navy Occupational Therapy video.

Navy Occupational Therapist Trey Elam uses a driving simulator in a treatment session with a patient in the Navy Occupational Therapy video.

“Some Medical Officers that are assigned to Marine Corps units do not have much experience with OT and aren’t aware of all we can offer,” said Trey, “ Having the video to train new residents is a valuable tool so when they get out to their respective units, they will know just how much OT can offer.”

Through the video, potential occupational therapists and medical officer learn about how occupational therapists help restore mental and motor function to improve the lives of their patients. The video also focuses on how Navy Occupational Therapists strive to evaluate patients and their routines, determining the restorative potential of the skills necessary to continue their daily activities.

Using actual patients treated by Navy Occupational Therapists, the video shows demonstrations of standard occupational therapy treatment plans that help patients not only return to everyday tasks such as brushing their teeth or bathing on their own, but to also return to active duty.

Trey, a 2012 graduate from the Department of Occupational Therapy, decided to pursue a career in occupational therapy after volunteering with the physical therapy and occupational therapy departments at the Caswell Center for the Developmentally Disabled in Kinston.

“Both are valued services, but I was more drawn to the functionality of what OT provides to patients and how innovative the OTs were to create just right challenges and adaptive equipment for my brother who is autistic and a resident at the Caswell Center,” he said.

After dedicating 100 more volunteer hours at the Womack Army Medical Hospital for Physical and Occupational Therapy, Trey found his niche in the outpatient Orthopedic setting.

“I fell in love with splint fabrication and post-operative upper extremity rehabilitation.”

Trey says his love for the field was nurtured by Dr. Leonard Trujillo, current OT department chair and retired Air Force Major.  Serving under Dr. Trujillo’s supervision during his graduate research project and seeking his advice regarding military OT was instrumental in developing Trey’s passion for OT according to Trey.

You can learn more about occupational therapy in the Navy visit this site: https://www.navy.com/careers/healthcare/clinical-care/occupational-therapy.html#ft-key-responsibilities

 

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Mar 172015
 

We are in the midst of an exciting week for our senior students at the Brody School of Medicine – Match Week! As medical students near the end of their third year, they begin to apply to residency training programs in their specialty of choice. These applications are completed in September of their fourth year, and students are invited for interviews from October through January.

At the end of the interview process, each student submits a ‘rank list’ through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). A rank list is an ordered list of programs indicating where the student would like to train. Residency programs also submit their rank lists through the NRMP, indicating their preference as to which students they would like to have in their program.

On Friday of this week, all medical students will find out where they will be completing their medical training. This day is called ‘Match Day’. At noon, in the Brody Auditorium, surrounded by their family and friends, our students will each receive an envelope with a letter inside letting them know where they matched. The event will be televised on ECU-TV.

The Brody School of Medicine Annual String of Pearls event will also be held this week, on Thursday, in the Brody Auditorium at noon. Our senior medical students have chosen eight faculty and staff mentors to give them five minutes of wisdom as they graduate from medical school. This is a fun event with wit and humor mixed with celebration. This event is open (and free!) to all Brody faculty and staff.

I look forward to celebrating with the Class of 2015 – I hope that you will join me!

Susan Schmidt, MD
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
Clinical Associate Professor of Family Medicine
Brody School of Medicine

Schmidt

Mar 102015
 

The East Carolina University College of Nursing inducted nine members to its Hall of Fame during a ceremony held at the Hilton in Greenville on Friday, March 6. The event, which also recognized the college’s 2015 Distinguished Alumnus, honored outstanding contributors to nursing in the areas of education, administration, research and practice.

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The evening’s honorees, from left: Rita Coggins, Roseanne Leahy, Distinguished Alumnus Dianne Marshburn, Madge Dews Thompson, Michelle Skipper, Becky Whitley and Pam Reis with ECU College of Nursing Dean Sylvia Brown.

This year’s class includes inductees from a range of impressive backgrounds, including a widely acclaimed Chicago-based speaker and author, the chief nursing officer of a major health system, two members of the college’s first graduating class, the former editor of the military’s Special Operations Forces Medical Handbook, and several esteemed College of Nursing faculty members.

Not only does the Hall of Fame honor prominent nursing professionals, it has raised approximately $85,000 for a merit-based student scholarship fund since its inception in 2011. Thanks to this program, the college will award its fifth Hall of Fame Scholarship this fall. This year’s recipient, Kelsey Leonard, a master’s student in the nurse anesthetist program, was recognized at the event.

“This Hall of Fame not only recognizes our outstanding leaders, but is another way to give back to future generations of nurses,” said Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the College of Nursing.

The 2015 inductees join a list of 70 Hall of Fame members representing eight states. Each new member receives a flame-shaped award that resembles the lamp illustrated on the college’s nursing pin. The lamp and its associated flame symbolize a commitment to service and a vibrant life.

This year’s Hall of Fame class:

Barbee Bancroft
Rita Coggins
Jeanette Jones
Roseanne Leahy
Pam Reis
Michelle Skipper
Jacquelyn Jones Stone
Madge Dews Thompson
Becky Whitley

On a night set aside for celebrating influential nurse leaders, the college also recognized the recipient of its 2015 Distinguished Alumnus Award. This year’s awardee is Dr. Dianne Marshburn, who has three degrees from the ECU College of Nursing. Marshburn recently retired from a 33-year career at Vidant Medical Center, where she served as director of clinical research at Vidant since 2008.

Learn more about the Hall of Fame by visiting www.nursing.ecu.edu/hof.cfm.

Mar 032015
 
Left to right, ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard, Dr. Wiley Nifong, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Rick Niswander, and Governor Pat McCrory

Left to right, ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard, Dr. Wiley Nifong, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Rick Niswander, and Governor Pat McCrory

Gov. Pat McCrory announced during his March 2 visit to the East Carolina Heart Institute at East Carolina University that his budget will allocate $16 million over the next two years to stabilize the financial challenges at the Brody School of Medicine.

“With those funds, my goal is for all of us to use the next two years to develop a long-term plan for a sustainable economic model that will allow the school to continue producing the doctors North Carolina needs for generations to come,” said McCrory.

Following a private meeting with ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Rick Niswander and Brody administrators, the governor toured the heart center’s Robotics Lab and tried his hand at a robotic surgery simulation.

Also in attendance were Dr. Aldona Wos, secretary for the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services, N.C. Sen. Louis Pate and N.C. Rep. Brian Brown.

N.C. Gov. Pat McCrory, left, and Dr. Wiley Nifong examine an interactive display illustrating that ECU has trained surgeons from 33 states in the use of the robotic da Vinci Surgical System.

At a press conference following the tour the governor said, “The Brody School has continued to deliver on the mission our state legislature set forth for it. Now we need to find a way to build upon those successes and expand them.

“I don’t see ECU as being only for eastern North Carolina. I see it as being for all of North Carolina,” he added.

Wos said, “It’s critical that we continue to fulfill the promise of 1974 – to provide access to care for the citizens of this region. The only way to do that is to have a viable medical community here that’s training the next generation of providers. The majority of physicians who train here, stay here. And I want to thank Brody for that.”

Ballard told McCrory, “I assure you that ECU will do our part. We’ll continue to spruce up the long-term plan we’ve been working on. It focuses on increasing efficiencies and continuing the excellent relationship we have with Vidant Medical Center, who is instrumental to our long-term plan.

“This funding means a flagship program of ours will be sustained,” he said, “and we’ll be able to continue impacting health care and economic development in the east.”

The governor’s recommended budget will soon be delivered to the legislature for consideration.

Mar 022015
 

Excel22East Carolina University freshmen and transfer students who are either majoring in an area within the College of Allied Health Sciences or interested in pursuing a degree from the College and earned a 3.0 GPA or higher during the fall semester were recognized for their academic achievements on Feb. 20 as part of the annual ECU EXCELS program.

Following a brief presentation by Interim Dean Greg Hassler, senior students and faculty members from the four undergraduate programs at CAHS, Clinical Laboratory Science, Health Services Management, Speech and Hearing Science, and Rehabilitation Services spoke about their programs and gave the students advice about how to make the most out of their majors and to continue succeeding in their college careers.

After hearing from the seniors, advisors Anthony Coutouzis and Kristal Gauthier presented the awarded students with an ECU Excels certificate, along with Dr. Hassler.

The following students were invited to be recognized as part of the ECU Excels Program:

Adams, Kathryn A.

Adams, Melissa D.

Alford, Carter L.

Almutairi, Rashed A.

Ayscue, Ashley K.

Baggett, Anna M.

Bates, Lindsey H.

Best, Morgan B.

Bogert, Hunter S.

Bridgers, Maci A.

Brinkley, Mariana E.

Bullard, Madison A.

Burgin, Stephanie

Butler, Jennifer B.

Cantrell, Casey F.

Clarke, Kimberly M.

Cline, Anna E.

Cooper, Alicia J.

Coro, Jeisy C.

Cox, Ashlyn B.

Currier, Madison M.

Daborowski, Jared D.

Dahrooge, Victoria M.

D’Artois, Kelsey A.

Davis, Kensleigh G.

DeGree, Meagan N.

DeRoche, Carina A.

Donaldson, Christina M.

Driver, Carrie L.

Echols, Aliyah D.

Evans, Brittany G.

Flaster, Traci M.

Fleming, Dusty L.

Furimsky, Stephanie A.

Gagliardi, Elizabeth R.

Garner, Elizabeth L.

Gibson, Wendy R.

Glenn, Corey S.

Goodman, Angela K.

Gregory, Candace C.

Hamiel, Kionna R.

Hancock, Paige E.

Hart, Dawn A.

Hauhuth, Kelly E.

Hernandez, Alicia N.

Herold, Amy C.

Hill, Matthew G.

Hoffman, Maria Christina K.

Holcomb, Michael J.

Houston, Kayla E.

Hughes, Anna J.

Jama, Hodan A.

James, Louisa D.

Jarman, Haleigh P.

Johnson, Chynah A.

Kea, Angela F.

Kline, Kylie P.

Koogler, Mary R.

Lancaster, Brittany D.

Lanier, Deanna T.

Le, TuAnh N.

Lee, Aspyn P.

Lee, Patricia L.

Luyster, Sydney R.

Marriaga Castillo, Abner E.

Marsh, Connie L.

Medina, Alexis M.

Miller, Jamie L.

Miller, Melissa L.

Mills, Kristina K.

Miranda, Shawn H.

Moore, Jessica M.

Murray, Harley K.

Nelson, Lani D.

Newnam, Andrew P.

Nguyen, Kristina Y.

Niccoli, Jennifer B.

Nicks, Charlotte E.

Palmiotto, Jessica L.

Paynter, Janis D.

Pemberton, Colleen A.

Phthisic, Rachel D.

Poole, Janice G.

Pozegic, Lejla

Price, Donna

Quick, Brandon F.

Ringenberg, Rachel N.

Robbins, Whitney A.

Robinson, Julie A.

Rodriguez, Angela N.

Sampson, Deion T.

Scales, Autumn K.

Schulman, Emily B.

Scribner, Haley

Skinner, Julia M.

Smith, Harley G.

Smith, Shadona R.

Stanley, Erica N.

Starling, Allison K.

Stevens, Erika

Stokes, Joel E.

Stone, Savanna J.

Strickland, Lydia G.

Taylor, Aubrie W.

Taylor, Garrett F.

Teeter, Meredith E.

Terrell, Teresa M.

Tisdale, Ashlynn S.

Valdez, Tatiana V.

Vue, Susan

Wallace, Shamika L.

Warren, Eddie E.

Waterman, Maryelizabeth

Williams, Vantisha B.

Wilson, Sierra K.

Ziegler, Melissa L.
The students then had the chance to tour the College and learn more about their intended or current majors.

This is the sixth year that the ECU Excels program has recognized the accomplishments of first time ECU students. For more information contact Anthony Coutouzis at coutousiza@ecu.edu.