novotnym

Aug 262014
 

Two ECU School of Dental Medicine faculty members, Dr. Ervin Davis and Dr. John Stockstill, and others have published a study, “Pain-related worry in patients with chronic orofacial pain,” in the July 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association. The researchers explored the prevalence of trait, general, and pain-related worry and the association of worry with high pain levels and other variables. The study found substantial levels of worry among patients and pain-related worry related to higher levels of pain, pain interference, and pain duration. Patients who have pain-related worries may overestimate the seriousness of having pain and think of dire consequences, even feeling their lives will be devastated by pain. Clinicians treating patients with orofacial pain should assess pain-related worry to understand the effects of their patient’s specific worries on pain and functioning. In addition, patients with substantial worry may be helped by learning techniques and skills to reduce unproductive worry and catastrophizing and improve skills to cope with chronic pain, such as learning distraction techniques, using positive self talk, and continuing activities and interests in spite of pain. Authors: C. Ervin Davis, MS, PhD; John W. Stockstill, DDS, MS; William D. Stanley, DDS, MS; Qiang   [read more...]

Dec 062013
 

Linda May, MS, PhD, assistant professor in the School of Dental Medicine Department of Foundational Sciences and Research, has received the Faculty Re-assignment Award for teaching release time for spring 2014 from the ECU Division of Research and Graduate Studies to prepare a competitive grant application to the National Institutes for Health (NIH) for continuation of her ENHANCED by Mom project. With North Carolina being the 5th worst state for childhood obesity rates, Dr. May studies how physical activity in mothers during pregnancy influences the development of the child before and after birth. “Although there are many programs targeting children to attenuate or eliminate childhood obesity, few programs begin the intervention during pregnancy,” said May. “From past studies, we know that exercise during pregnancy decreases fat gain and risk of gestational diabetes, and it improves pregnancy outcomes.” May will seek NIH funding to continue studying pregnant moms and their babies and to take her work a step further by offering education programs for pregnant moms. She plans to work with the school’s Community Service Learning Centers across the state to partner with pregnant moms and health professionals to explore the effects of obesity during pregnancy on babies and children and   [read more...]