Apr 212015
 

IMG_6110withsignlr

Many oncology patients are at risk for varying degrees of heart damage due to the toxic side effects of cancer treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy, especially older patients and those with preexisting heart conditions.

To address the unique needs of these patients, medical specialists from the Department of Internal Medicine’s Division of Hematology/Oncology and the Cardiology Division of the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences at the Brody School of Medicine at ECU have joined forces to develop a new Cardio-Oncology Clinic at the East Carolina Heart Institute at East Carolina University.

Clinicians at this new clinic evaluate a patient’s heart function before, during and after cancer treatments using state-of-the-art imaging technology in order to detect whether the patient has suffered heart damage or is at risk of developing heart problems.

Cardiologists with training and expertise in advanced heart imaging, such as cardiac MRI, guide patients toward the most appropriate forms of imaging for their particular situations.

When heart damage is detected, the cardiologists and oncologists work together to adjust cancer treatments, prescribe heart medications or refer patients to other cardiology specialists within the East Carolina Heart Institute, including those who focus on congestive heart failure, electrophysiology or interventional cardiology.

For more information or to make an appointment call 252-744-3476.

Share/Bookmark
Apr 072015
 

SpeakingVolumesPosterLaupus Library will host a new discussion series entitled “Speaking Volumes: A Book Discussion Series Focusing on the Health Sciences.” The series provides authors with a different venue for dissemination of their work and serves as an opportunity for others to learn more about the culture of the Health Sciences and the work done by ECU scholars and researchers.

The inaugural program will showcase the recently published book, Global Health Nursing: Narratives from the Field. The event will be held on April 16th at 4:30 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery located on the 4th floor gallery of Laupus Library.

Chapter contributor Dr. Kim L. Larson from ECU’s College of Nursing will present along with book editor, Christina A. Harlan (UNC Chapel Hill School of Nursing) and chapter contributors Marie Collins Donahue (UNC Children’s Hospital), Christina Martinez Kim (Duke University Health Systems), and Ruth-Ann McLendon (Johns Hopkins Medical Center).

Introductory remarks on the inspiration for the work will be followed by chapter readings from all four contributing authors. Each will share their own perspectives and experiences as nurses serving as front-line providers in global health. The authors will recount their personal experiences with the Ebola epidemic, treating patients with AIDS, and the challenges and rewards of confronting vast health disparities and providing health care in other languages and in different cultural contexts. The program will end with a question and answer session.

“Speaking Volumes” complements Laupus Library’s Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards program, which honors Health Sciences faculty and staff for their published research and scholarly contributions to their area of study.

You can find out more about Global Health Nursing: Narratives from the Field on the Springer website at http://www.springerpub.com/global-health-nursing-2101.html

The event is open to the public. For more information please contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu.

–Kelly R. Dilda
Laupus Library

Mar 172015
 

We are in the midst of an exciting week for our senior students at the Brody School of Medicine – Match Week! As medical students near the end of their third year, they begin to apply to residency training programs in their specialty of choice. These applications are completed in September of their fourth year, and students are invited for interviews from October through January.

At the end of the interview process, each student submits a ‘rank list’ through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). A rank list is an ordered list of programs indicating where the student would like to train. Residency programs also submit their rank lists through the NRMP, indicating their preference as to which students they would like to have in their program.

On Friday of this week, all medical students will find out where they will be completing their medical training. This day is called ‘Match Day’. At noon, in the Brody Auditorium, surrounded by their family and friends, our students will each receive an envelope with a letter inside letting them know where they matched. The event will be televised on ECU-TV.

The Brody School of Medicine Annual String of Pearls event will also be held this week, on Thursday, in the Brody Auditorium at noon. Our senior medical students have chosen eight faculty and staff mentors to give them five minutes of wisdom as they graduate from medical school. This is a fun event with wit and humor mixed with celebration. This event is open (and free!) to all Brody faculty and staff.

I look forward to celebrating with the Class of 2015 – I hope that you will join me!

Susan Schmidt, MD
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
Clinical Associate Professor of Family Medicine
Brody School of Medicine

Schmidt

Mar 032015
 
Left to right, ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard, Dr. Wiley Nifong, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Rick Niswander, and Governor Pat McCrory

Left to right, ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard, Dr. Wiley Nifong, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Rick Niswander, and Governor Pat McCrory

Gov. Pat McCrory announced during his March 2 visit to the East Carolina Heart Institute at East Carolina University that his budget will allocate $16 million over the next two years to stabilize the financial challenges at the Brody School of Medicine.

“With those funds, my goal is for all of us to use the next two years to develop a long-term plan for a sustainable economic model that will allow the school to continue producing the doctors North Carolina needs for generations to come,” said McCrory.

Following a private meeting with ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Rick Niswander and Brody administrators, the governor toured the heart center’s Robotics Lab and tried his hand at a robotic surgery simulation.

Also in attendance were Dr. Aldona Wos, secretary for the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services, N.C. Sen. Louis Pate and N.C. Rep. Brian Brown.

N.C. Gov. Pat McCrory, left, and Dr. Wiley Nifong examine an interactive display illustrating that ECU has trained surgeons from 33 states in the use of the robotic da Vinci Surgical System.

At a press conference following the tour the governor said, “The Brody School has continued to deliver on the mission our state legislature set forth for it. Now we need to find a way to build upon those successes and expand them.

“I don’t see ECU as being only for eastern North Carolina. I see it as being for all of North Carolina,” he added.

Wos said, “It’s critical that we continue to fulfill the promise of 1974 – to provide access to care for the citizens of this region. The only way to do that is to have a viable medical community here that’s training the next generation of providers. The majority of physicians who train here, stay here. And I want to thank Brody for that.”

Ballard told McCrory, “I assure you that ECU will do our part. We’ll continue to spruce up the long-term plan we’ve been working on. It focuses on increasing efficiencies and continuing the excellent relationship we have with Vidant Medical Center, who is instrumental to our long-term plan.

“This funding means a flagship program of ours will be sustained,” he said, “and we’ll be able to continue impacting health care and economic development in the east.”

The governor’s recommended budget will soon be delivered to the legislature for consideration.

Feb 102015
 

When East CarolinREACH QI Symp Jan 2015a University’s Brody School of Medicine was awarded a $1 million grant by the American Medical Association in 2013 to help shape how future doctors are trained, AMA leaders cited the school’s reputation for bold innovation.

That spirit of innovation was the guest of honor at a symposium held January 21 at the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU. The Quality Improvement Symposium showcased 25 quality improvement projects by faculty members across the health sciences. All are inaugural fellows in Brody’s Teachers of Quality Academy (TQA) who spent the past year pioneering ways to better meet the demands of a changing health care delivery system.

Brody established the academy shortly after being named one of only 11 medical schools to receive the five-year REACH (Redesigning Education to Accelerate Change in Healthcare) grant. The TQA is an eighteen-month faculty development program designed to prepare faculty to teach new curriculum in patient safety, quality improvement and population health in an environment of inter-professional, team-based care.

The symposium’s best oral presentation award went to Dr. Niti Armistead in the Department of Internal Medicine, for her work entitled, “Hypoglycemia and Harm Reduction through Education and Increased Use of Order Sets.” Honorable mentions for oral presentations were awarded to Dr. Jason Foltz, Department of Family Medicine, for his presentation, “Reduction in Primary Care No Show Rates,” and Dr. Megan Sippey, Department of Surgery, for her presentation, “Resident Education: Improving Surgical History and Physical Documentation.”

The best poster award went to Dr. Bryan Kitch, Department of Emergency Medicine, for his project, “Identification and Recognition of Boarding Psychiatric Patients Can Lead to Improved Medication Reconciliation.” Dr. Harry Adams, formerly in the Department of Internal Medicine and now with the Office of Medical Education, received honorable mention for his poster, “Integration of Pathology and Pharmacology Learning Issues into the Clinically Based Seminars in the M2 Introduction to Medicine Course.”

The academy has produced 20 new curricular components and student experiences that are already being infused into medical, allied health and nursing education across ECU.

To learn more about the REACH Initiative, visit www.ecu.edu/reach/.