Nov 182014
 

Eighty-eight East Carolina University faculty and staff were honored Nov. 11 for their published works at the William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library’s annual Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards ceremony.

Faculty and staff submitted 240 entries including 206 peer-reviewed journal articles, 21 book chapters and 13 books published between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014.

“The awards pay tribute to those who expand the scholarly work of the university and the research reputation of the Division of Health Sciences through their published works,” said Dr. Gregory Hassler, interim director of Laupus Library. “We express gratitude to our authors for their hard work and impressive scholarship.”

The library hosted the awards ceremony and dinner reception for honorees at the Greenville Hilton. The event was co-sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library, which provide needed support for special programs and activities of the library.

Other sponsors were Matthews Book Company, Dr. John Papalas, Springer, Dr. and Mrs. Donald Hoffman, Dr. and Mrs. Dan Shingleton, Dr. Lorrie Basnight, Dr. Greg Hassler, Dr. Jackie Hutcherson, Dr. and Mrs. James Hallock, Eastern Carolina Foot and Ankle Specialists, Dr. and Mrs. Jon Tingelstad, The little bank, Drs. Bob Thompson and Marie Pokorny, Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eakin, Dr. Mary Raab, Mr. Dwain Teague and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rogers.

Authors recognized in the College of Allied Health Sciences were Jason Brinkley, Leigh W. Cellucci, Martha Chapin, Anne Dickerson, Denise Donica, Elizabeth Forrestal, Susie Harris, Robert Kulesher, Jane Patton, Balaji Rangarathnam, Leonard Trujillo, and Heather Harris Wright.

The Brody School of Medicine authors were Abdel Abdel-Rahman, Emily Askew, Yan-Hua Chen, W. Randolph Chitwood Jr., David Collier, Irma Corral, Kay Craven, Doyle Cummings, Paul Cunningham, Moahad Dar, Ronald Dudek, Chris Duffrin, Clinton Faulk, Jonathon Firnhaber, Annette Greer, Eleanor Harris, Katherine Jones, Gregory D. Kearney, Susan Keen, Brett Keiper, Cheryl Knudson, Warren Knudson, Kathryn Kolasa, Brandon Kyle, Hope Landrine, Suzanne Lea, Myon-Hee Lee, Darla Liles, Qun Lu, Robert Lust, Christopher Mansfield, Laura Matarese, William Meggs, Assad Movahed, Rajasekhar Nekkanti, Ronald Perkin, Stephanie Pitts, Walter Pories, Stephanie Richards, Jacques Robidoux, Rachel Roper,  Maria J. Ruiz-Echevarria, Susan Schmidt, George Sigounas, Robert Tanenberg, Danielle Walsh, David Weismiller and Li Yang.

The School of Dental Medicine authors were Carol Anderson, Grishondra Branch-Mays, Joseph Califano, Gregory Chadwick, C. Ervin Davis, Waldemar de Rijk, James Hupp, Lamont Lowery, Linda May, John Stockstill, and Margaret Wilson.

The Laupus Health Sciences Library authors were Kathy Cable and Carrie Forbes.

Those recognized in the College of Nursing were Sylvia Brown, Robin Webb Corbett, Patricia Crane, Martha Engelke, Laura Gantt, Sonya R. Hardin, Candace Harrington, D. Elizabeth Jesse, Ann King, Nanette Lavoie-Vaughan, Michele Mendes, Janice Neil, Elaine Scott, and Melvin Swanson.

Highlighting the awards ceremony was the presentation of the Laupus Medallion to seven book authors. The Medallion is a smaller version of the Laupus Bronze sculpture which hangs in the atrium of the health sciences building at the entrance to the Laupus Library. Both the Bronze and Medallion were designed by Hanna Jubran and Jodi Hollnagel-Jubran of ECU’s School of Art and Design.  This year’s book authors are Leigh Cellucci (CAHS), W. Randolph Chitwood (BSOM), Ronald Dudek (BSOM), Carrie Forbes (LL), James Hupp (SODM), William Meggs (BSOM) and Laura Matarese (BSOM.

A copy of the bibliography is available on the Library’s website www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/HSAR with additional information and photographs from the event.

 

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Oct 302014
 

CRAVENAs the holiday season approaches, many of us look forward to fun events full of family, friends and food. However, those who are working to achieve or maintain a healthy weight may also worry about gaining extra pounds amidst the celebration.

Registered dietitian nutritionist Kay Craven of ECU’s Department of Family Medicine points out a few simple strategies that can curb weight gain during all the festivities.

  • Plan ahead. When you enter a party, take a few minutes to survey the foods that are available before you fill your plate. Decide which ones are most appealing to you and choose small portions of those. Rather than trying it all, take the time to savor and enjoy the foods you chose. Then move away from the food and focus on the friends and fun.
  • Don’t skip meals. Many people are tempted to skip lunch in order to splurge in the evening. But arriving at a party with an empty stomach often increases the temptation to overindulge. Instead, eat a small meal or snack such as vegetable sticks, fresh fruit, low fat yogurt or cheese, or a few nuts prior to the party. Don’t skip breakfast, either; research shows that will only lead you to consume more calories later in the day.
  • Choose vegetables first. Holiday meals are usually large and involve multiple helpings. Opting for vegetables and salad with low fat dressing first can fill you up early and stave off the desire for large portions of higher calorie meats and desserts.
  • Slow down. Mom was right. Eating slowly gives your brain timeto register how full you really are. Wait ten minutes to evaluate your hunger before going back for seconds.
  • Bring a healthy dish. Many celebrations are potluck. If you offer to bring something on the lighter side, you know a healthy option will be available. And other guests willprobably thank you.
  • Keep moving. Consider wearing a pedometer and set goals – or have a contest between family members – to increase your steps during the holidays. Take a walk with family members during gatherings. Or plan outdoor games with the kids.

 

Oct 282014
 

pink-ribbon-hi

It is estimated by the American Cancer Society that 235,030 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2014 and that 40,430 deaths will occur as a result of breast cancer.  With the exception of skin cancer, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women.  United States mortality data shows a steady decrease in death rates for breast cancer since 1989.  This is mostly likely a result of improved early detection and treatment. 

Since breast cancer usually produces no symptoms in the early stages, the key to early detection is having regular breast exams and mammograms.  With early detection treatment options are increased.  Every woman should discuss appropriate screening options depending on their individual risk factors.

Brody School of Medicine’s talented and dedicated physicians treat patients at Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center, an East Carolina University and Vidant Health Collaboration in Cancer Care. Specialties include gynecologic oncology, hematology oncology and surgical oncology. To learn more about the Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center visit www.leowjenkinscancercenter.com.

To learn more about breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment visit on-line the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society.

Sep 232014
 

Between 90,000 and 100,000 Americans are living with sickle cell disease today and approximately 125 infants are born with it every year in North Carolina – 25 of them in eastern North Carolina. September has been designated National Sickle Cell Awareness Month to increase awareness of their plight.

“Normal red blood cells are soft and round and can squeeze through tiny blood vessels. They carry oxygen to all parts of the body through a substance called hemoglobin,” said Dr. Beng Fuh, director of hematology and oncology for the Department of Pediatrics at the Brody School of Medicine.

Fuh said sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that occurs predominantly in African-Americans. The red blood cells of people with the disease contain mostly abnormal hemoglobin, which causes their red blood cells to stiffen, bend into the shape of a sickle – a curved tool once used to harvest wheat – and sometimes block small blood vessels. Complications include anemia, tissue and organ damage, strokes and excruciating pain.

Because blood transfusions are one of the main treatments for these complications, ECU’s Sickle Cell Awareness Committee has partnered with the local American Red Cross to encourage eligible donors to give blood in September to help ensure a stable and diverse blood supply for people living with this disease.

ECU’s sickle cell disease program is one of the largest in the state with approximately 900 adult and pediatric patients.

Sep 112014
 

Hal Garland, executive director of the Golden Living Center, presents a check for $123,000 to Dr. Chelley Alexander, chair of the Department of Family Medicine at ECU’s Brody School of Medicine, to support the medical school’s Teaching Nursing Home Project. Pictured (from left) are Dr. Kenneth Steinweg, director of the geriatric division for the Department of Family Medicine; Garland; Alexander; Maria Knupp, family nurse practitioner with the project; and Dr. Renee Banaszak, the project’s director.Hal Garland, executive director of the Golden Living Center, presents a check for $123,000 to Dr. Chelley Alexander, chair of the Department of Family Medicine at ECU’s Brody School of Medicine, to support the medical school’s Teaching Nursing Home Project. Pictured (from left) are Dr. Kenneth Steinweg, director of the geriatric division for the Department of Family Medicine; Garland; Alexander; Maria Knupp, family nurse practitioner with the project; and Dr. Renee Banaszak, the project’s director.

Golden Living Center has donated  $123,000 to the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University to support a nursing home teaching project.

Brody’s Department of Family Medicine provides primary medical care for the residents of the local Golden Living Center on MacGregor Downs Road. The 72,000-square-foot facility houses 152 residents.

Hal Garland, executive director of the local Golden Living Center, presented the donation to Dr. Chelley Alexander, chair of the Department of Family Medicine at Brody; Dr. Kenneth Steinweg, director of the geriatrics division for the Department of Family Medicine; Maria Knupp, family nurse practitioner with the project; and Dr. Renee Banaszak, the project’s director.

The money will be used to support the instruction of resident physicians and geriatric fellows, faculty salaries and teaching materials. Medical, pharmacy and physician assistant students also go to Golden Living Center for clinical learning.

This year is the 33rd the center has supported the teaching project with cumulative support totaling more than $2.5 million.