Sep 192014
 

The College of Allied Health Sciences is planning for two big events in October, the 44th Annual Meta M. Downes Speech-Language and Hearing Symposium and the Health Informatics Career and Internship Symposium.

Downes SymposiumThe Downes Symposium, sponsored by the East Carolina University Chapter of the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association in cooperation with the ECU Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSDI) and Eastern AHEC, will enable learners to increase knowledge and skills needed to work with individuals with communication impairments and their families. The target audience includes speech-language pathologists, audiologists, students, and all interested others.

The theme for this year’s symposium is “Developing Evidence Based Treatment for Childhood Articulation Disorders and Vocabulary and Literacy Development in Latino Preschoolers” and will feature lectures from CSDI faculty members Lucia Mendez and Yolanda Holt. Along with development activities based on the symposium theme, those in attendance will also learn more about evidence-based practices, posing clinical questions, impact of variations in classification of disorders, and the link between vocabulary and literacy.

This annual professional development event will be held Oct. 17 from 8:30 a.m to 4:30 p.m.at the East Carolina Heart Institute with registration beginning at 8 a.m. For more information view the brochure.

The Health Informatics Career and Internship is a collaborative effort between Duke Center for Health Informatics, the Department of Health Service and Information Management at East Carolina University College of HI Flyer with Big LogosAllied Health Sciences, East Carolina University College of Business, the School of Library and Information Sciences at North Carolina Central University, the Carolina Health Informatics Program at University of North Carolina, and the Health Informatics Professional Science program at UNC-Charlotte.

Spear-headed by the Department of Health Services and Information Management at ECU (HSIM), this event will provide a venue for students and the general public to learn about practicum opportunities, the latest research trends and developments in health industries and job opportunities in the health informatics field. At the fair, students will also have the opportunity to meet and get to know potential employers.

Along with hearing from keynote speaker Lynne Thomas Gordan, chief executive officer of the American Health Information Management Association, those in attendance will also have the opportunity to participate in panel discussions on topics such as transitioning into health informatics, careers in health informatics and perspectives in health informatics. Panelists and moderators include faculty from all participating universities as well as employers and students.

The Health Informatics Career and Internship Symposium/Fair will be held Oct. 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with registration beginning at 9:30 a.m. in the East Carolina Heart Institute. for more information visit www.hicareerfair.com.

 

 

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Sep 022014
 

The Academy of Community Engagement Scholarship (ACES) board of directors has invited Dr. Beth Velde, director of strategic planning & the Mills Symposium for the College of Allied Health Sciences, to become an inaugural member of the Academy.

Dr. Beth Velde

Dr. Velde was nominated and selected by peers because of her practice and model of excellence in collaboration with communities and the university while addressing critical issues of mutual benefit. She will be inducted to the Academy Oct. 7 at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium.

The mission of the Academy of Engaged Scholarship (ACES) is to assist in improving the physical, social, civic and economic well-being of communities by advancing scholarship based on collaborative discovery by communities and their higher education partners. To do so, ACES selects persons in communities and higher education institutions who have been recognized by their peers as exceptional in their accomplishments in engagement to serve as members. These members then draw on that expertise to further the application of engagement for addressing the challenges and opportunities of community and higher education partners.  Members selected will also have the opportunity to serve the greater good by advancing community engagement scholarship and advancing community-engaged disciplinary and transdisciplinary scholarly activities and knowledge to address regional, national, and global issues. 

ACES explores critical and complex societal and community issues and provides recommendations, upon request, to inform local, regional, national, and international research and policy agendas using input and valuable data gathered through the involvement of leading community engagement scholars, community engagement partners, and knowledgeable community counterparts.

At the forefront of ACES’ mission is the need to ensure that all scholarly activities and policy initiatives keep in mind the needs of the constituents involved. Through their transparency, willingness to involve all groups in their practices, and encouragement of shared authority, ACES serves as a representative voice of allied groups in the field of engagement.

Beth Velde, PhD is a professor emerita within the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University and chair of the APLU’s Council on Engagement and Outreach. She directs the ECU Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy which prepares ECU faculty,  graduate students and ECU scholars to partner with communities and conduct research that is important and relevant to the communities. Her research includes the culture of engagement at ECU, the perceptions of community partners regarding the roles and responsibilities of telling the story of community engagement, and the synergies between leadership and public service. She leads the ECU team for the Carnegie engaged university designation and chaired the working groups responsible for the SACS narratives on public service and community engagement.

Learn more about the Academy of Engagement Scholarship at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium website here.

Aug 152014
 

If you walk by the Department of Physician Assistant Studies lab in the College of Allied Health Sciences, you may notice someone lying alone on a hospital bed. Don’t be alarmed, our students haven’t abandoned an ailing patient, that’s just the new patient simulator waiting for the next round of students to practice medical procedures and diagnoses skills with him.

(L-R) PA faculty members Kim Stokes, Natalie Smith, Julie Daniel-Yount, and Jane Trapp work on the patient simulator during the faculty training session.

(L-R) PA faculty members Kim Stokes, Natalie Smith, Julie Daniel-Yount, and Jane Trapp work on the patient simulator during the faculty training session.

This newest simulation tool effectively prepares PA students for their field by allowing them to act out patient scenarios in a controlled environment. The Laerdal SimMan Essentials patient simulator, which has been named “Sammy” by the the PA department, can present several different types of symptoms including dilated pupils, increased heart rate, strange lung sounds, and many other diagnosable issues. With pulse points in five different locations, eyes that blink, and several other life-like features, “Sammy” is as “real” as a patient can be without actually being alive.

“Simulation is a wonderful way for students to practice in a virtual environment where mistakes can be made and learned from without affecting real patients,” said Dr. Alan Gindoff, chair of the Department.

With a panel in the arm of the SimMan, students can place IVs and administer drugs for treatment.

With a panel in the arm of the SimMan, students can place IVs and administer drugs for treatment.

Once a faculty member has used the wireless, touch-screen monitor to give the simulator a certain ailment, PA students then actually perform a physical examination, diagnose the problem and carry-out a treatment plan. With this method of learning, PA students can learn skills hands-on such as how to intubate, treat a pneumothorax (collapsed lung), perform an intraosseous infusion into the bone marrow of the simulator’s knee and chest, and administer drugs intravenously.

The patient simulator monitor tracks the heart rate, oxygen stats and blood pressure of the SimMan, similar to that of a hospital monitor. With this advanced technology, PA students are able to actually carry out diagnoses and treatments with a “patient” that reacts to their courses of action versus simply planning and discussing them . Also with the monitor, faculty is able to change and customize the SimMan’s condition at the touch of a button during the treatment, such as increasing his heart-rate, decreasing his oxygen levels or distending his abdomen.

With interchangeable and customizable parts, the SimMan can allow for several different types of scenarios that help prepare PA students for obstacles in the medical field, whether that is a swollen tongue making intubation difficult or a sudden need for CPR.

“Through simulation, student can apply medical management in near real-life scenarios so they may develop complex skill sets before they actually perform them on human beings,” said Gindoff, “This is unlike a multiple choice test where the answers are in front of you, waiting to be chosen from a list. This is like real-life where you have to use your knowledge to diagnose a variety of symptoms and what those symptoms may mean when presented all together.”

The touch-screen monitor displays active medical conditions and allows faculty to control the patient simulator's symptoms and reactions to treatment.

The touch-screen monitor displays active medical conditions and allows faculty to control the patient simulator’s symptoms and reactions to treatment.

Through patient simulators, the Department of Physician Assistant studies is effectively preparing students for the medical field. “Sammy” may be just a patient simulator, but through his life-like symptoms and various diagnoses, he is training future PAs for real life patients.

Jul 292014
 

The Department of Health Services and Information Management at the College of Allied Health Sciences has created a new opportunity for students with its Registered Health Information Administrator (RHIA) graduate certificate program.

The RHIA graduate certificate program will provide students that already have a bachelor’s degree with the knowledge and skills needed in order to serve as a critical link between health care providers, payers, and patients. The curriculum is designed to help students develop characteristics associated with an effective leader in health information management: critical thinking skills, problem solving abilities, communication and interpersonal skills, and ethical values.

The objective of this certificate program is to expand upon the students’ current knowledge and skills in order to qualify them to register for the national Registered Health Information Administrators (RHIA) credential examination offered by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

Dr. Paul Bell

Dr. Paul Bell

“The Department of Health Services and Information Management is proud to offer the new graduate registered health information administrator certificate. The certificate makes it possible for individuals with a previously earned undergraduate degree to become eligible for the RHIA credential. Furthermore, the RHIA credential should help strengthen an individual’s overall marketability in the growing field of health care informatics and information management,” said Dr. Paul Bell, professor in the department and coordinator for the new certificate.

Students enrolled in the Registered Health Information Administrator certificate program will not only be prepared to take the RHIA exam, but will also be equipped with the skills to manage patient health information and medical records, administer computer information systems, collect and analyze patient data, and use classification systems and medical terminologies. Along with those skills, successful students will be able to effectively interact with various levels of an organization that employ patient data in decision-making and everyday operations.

Career choices for students holding this certificate are available in multiple settings throughout the healthcare industry such as program director, chief compliance officer, director of risk management, and director of clinical informatics.

For more information, visit the RHIA certificate website at www.ecu.edu/hsim/RHIA.cfm or contact Dr. Paul Bell at bellp@ecu.edu .

To check out other certificate programs offered by the Department of Health Services and Information Management visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/hsim/degrees.cfm.

Jul 112014
 

The College of Allied Health Science is strengthening its focus on research through the development of a new Office of Research webpage and newsletter, as well as improving existing research lab websites.

Under the direction of Dr. Heather Harris-Wright, the associate dean of research for the College, the research website underwent a face lift to allow for a more user-friendly look.

“Research within our college well represents the diversity of Allied Health. It is exciting to learn about the breadth of our faculty’s research and I am thrilled to be able to support our faculty as they pursue their research goals, disseminate their research findings, seek and procure funding, develop and strengthen collaborations within the college and across the university, and engage students in their research programs,” said Dr. Wright, “The Office of Research is here to support our faculty and provide the resources and services needed so the faculty can advance their research programs.”

The new site will feature a monthly interview with a research faculty member from the College, this month’s interview subject was Dr. John Willson from the Department of Physical Therapy. Each faculty member will answer the same five questions regarding their research, their experience at East Carolina University, and their passion for teaching.

The site also provides links to useful resources for both faculty and students along with links to important research-related sites within the Univeristy.

Research Page

Along with the website update for the Office of Research, several CAHS research labs beefed up their web presence as well. Links to information on labs such as the Human Movement Analysis Lab in the Department of Physical Therapy, Navigate Counseling Clinic in the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies, Research for the Adult Driver Initiative in the Department of Occupational Therapy, and the Aging and Adult Language Disorders and Voice and Swallowing Labs in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders are all available on the “Research in CAHS” page of the Office of Research website. Through the lab websites, you can learn more about the research topics being analyzed at the College and discover information about publications, facilities and current faculty working in that area.

HMAL lab

the ECU Human Movement Analysis Laboratory website is updated and informative, visit the by clicking this screenshot.

Faculty, staff and students can stay up to date about happenings in the “research world” by not only visiting the Office of Research site, but also through the monthly research update e-newsletter. The newsletter will provide vital information about funding opportunities, upcoming deadlines, resources and highlights from CAHS research developments. If you would like to receive the research update, contact Dr. Wright at wrighth@ecu.edu.