Jul 112014
 

The College of Allied Health Science is strengthening its focus on research through the development of a new Office of Research webpage and newsletter, as well as improving existing research lab websites.

Under the direction of Dr. Heather Harris-Wright, the associate dean of research for the College, the research website underwent a face lift to allow for a more user-friendly look.

“Research within our college well represents the diversity of Allied Health. It is exciting to learn about the breadth of our faculty’s research and I am thrilled to be able to support our faculty as they pursue their research goals, disseminate their research findings, seek and procure funding, develop and strengthen collaborations within the college and across the university, and engage students in their research programs,” said Dr. Wright, “The Office of Research is here to support our faculty and provide the resources and services needed so the faculty can advance their research programs.”

The new site will feature a monthly interview with a research faculty member from the College, this month’s interview subject was Dr. John Willson from the Department of Physical Therapy. Each faculty member will answer the same five questions regarding their research, their experience at East Carolina University, and their passion for teaching.

The site also provides links to useful resources for both faculty and students along with links to important research-related sites within the Univeristy.

Research Page

Along with the website update for the Office of Research, several CAHS research labs beefed up their web presence as well. Links to information on labs such as the Human Movement Analysis Lab in the Department of Physical Therapy, Navigate Counseling Clinic in the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies, Research for the Adult Driver Initiative in the Department of Occupational Therapy, and the Aging and Adult Language Disorders and Voice and Swallowing Labs in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders are all available on the “Research in CAHS” page of the Office of Research website. Through the lab websites, you can learn more about the research topics being analyzed at the College and discover information about publications, facilities and current faculty working in that area.

HMAL lab

the ECU Human Movement Analysis Laboratory website is updated and informative, visit the by clicking this screenshot.

Faculty, staff and students can stay up to date about happenings in the “research world” by not only visiting the Office of Research site, but also through the monthly research update e-newsletter. The newsletter will provide vital information about funding opportunities, upcoming deadlines, resources and highlights from CAHS research developments. If you would like to receive the research update, contact Dr. Wright at wrighth@ecu.edu.

 

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Jun 062014
 

The College of Allied Health Sciences and Dean Stephen Thomas were happy to award eight CAHS scholarships to deserving students enrolled in our College.

Marianne Gross

Marianne Gross and Dean Stephen Thomas

Marianne Gross, daughter of Peter and Ann Gross of Charlotte, N.C., received the State Employees Combined Campaign Scholarship. The scholarship is funded through the contributions of state employees and is awarded based on academic merit. Marianne is a second year student in the Department of Physical Therapy and will graduate in May 2016 with her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.

 

 

 

Anastasia Hastie

Anastasia Hastie and Dean Stephen Thomas

Anastasia Hastie, daughter of Victoria Kolbakh of Tampa, Fla. and wife of U.S. Marine Christopher Hastie, was awarded the College of Allied Health Sciences Patriot Scholarship. The Patriot Scholarship supports two undergraduate or graduate students enrolled in any department of the College of Allied Health Sciences. The applicant must be a military member or veteran, or the spouse or child of a military member or veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States. The award is based on academic strength, leadership capability and the potential to contribute to a profession in the field of allied health sciences. Anastasia is a second year student in the Department of Physician Assistant Studies and would like to work with veterans and military families after graduating.

SarahJarmaillo

Sarah Jaramillo and Dean Stephen Thomas

Sarah Jamarillo, daughter of Allen and Carolynn Marsh of Kittery, Maine and wife of U.S. Marine Tyler Jaramillo, was also awarded the Patriot Scholarship. Sarah will be a second year student in the fall in the Department of Occupational Therapy and will graduate in Dec. 2015 with a Master of Science degree in Occupational Therapy.

 

 

 

Kaitlyn Puglisi

Kaitlyn Puglisi and Dean Stephen Thomas

Kaitlyn Puglisi, daughter of Jeff and Kelly Puglisi of Clayton, N.C., earned the SGM HermanJ. Kennedy Memorial Scholarship. The scholarship provides financial support to undergraduate and graduate CAHS students who are either active, reserved or retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces or the spouse or child of an active, reserve or retired U.S. Armed Forces member, or students who are currently enrolled in the ROTC program. Kaitlyn is a rising senior in the Health Services Management program in the Department of Health Services and Information Management and hopes to work in the Public Health field upon graduation.

MelissaReynolds

Melissa Reynolds and Dean Stephen Thomas

Melissa Reynolds, daughter of David and Beth Reynolds of North Wilkesboro, N.C. received the Pitt County Memorial Hospital Volunteer Auxiliary Scholarship. The scholarship is awarded to an undergraduate or graduate student currently enrolled full-time in the College of Allied Health Sciences and is based on academic merit and a history of volunteer service in health care. Melissa is a first year graduate student in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders in pursuit of becoming a speech-language pathologist upon graduation.

Courtney Spencer

Courtney Spencer and Dean Stephen Thomas

 

Courtney Spencer, daughter of Len and Robin Spencer of Preston, Conn., has been awarded the East Carolina University Medical and Health Sciences Foundation Board Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded to full-time junior, senior and graduate students enrolled in the College of Allied Health Sciences and honors recipients in good academic standing. Courtney is currently in her second year in the Department of Occupational Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences from which she will graduate in 2015 with a Master of Science degree in Occupational Therapy.

JamineIfedi

Jamine Ifedi and Dean Stephen Thomas

Jamine Ifedi, son of Ike and Victoria Ifedi of Charlotte, N.C. was awarded the College of Allied Health Sciences Alliance for Excellence Scholarship. The purpose of the College of Allied Health Sciences Alliance for Excellence Scholarship is to provide financial support to students enrolled in the College of Allied Health Sciences based on academic ability, academic major, leadership activities, and extracurricular activities, and other criteria determined appropriate by the CAHS Honors and Awards Committee. Jamine is a rising senior in the Health Services Management program in the Department of Health Services and Information Management department, he hopes to pursue a career in medicine and enroll in Brody School of Medicine upon graduation from CAHS. He is the president and co-founder of The T.E.A.M. (Talented Empowered Aspiring Men) and a resident advisor in Scott Hall.

Congratulations to all of the scholarship winners for the 2014-2015 academic year. For more information about available scholarships at the College of Allied Health Sciences visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/ah/scholarship.cfm .

May 012014
 

Dr. Jamie Perry, assistant professor, and Lakshmi Kollara-Sunil, a second year doctoral student,  both in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, have a newly funded grant from the Cleft Palate Foundation.

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Dr. Jamie Perry

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Lakshmi Kollara-Sunil

In their work, they are using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging during speech to examine the musculature in a unique clinical population - 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. This study will represent the first published findings of speech muscles among this clinical population. Data will provide insight into the unique muscle and cranial variations among these children.

22q11.2 deletion syndrome is caused by the deletion of part of Chromosome 22. It affects an estimated 1 in 4,000 people. The features of this syndrome vary considerably; however, common signs and symptoms include heart abnormalities, cleft palate and distinct facial features. Individuals with this syndrome may develop autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and Graves disease.  Children with this syndrome experience developmental delays including speech development delays and learning disabilities.

Both Dr. Perry and Kollara-Sunil expect the study will impact the surgical and clinical treatment plans and improve the speech outcomes following surgery.

According to the foundation website, the Cleft Palate Foundation (CPF) has funded research related to cleft and craniofacial anomalies since 1989. CPF has awarded over half a million dollars in research funding with the grants ranging from $5,000 to $10,000. Such funds are awarded based on criteria such as the significance or importance of the proposed research in the field of health care and the relevance of the proposed research to the field of cleft lip and palate and other craniofacial abnormalities.

For more information about the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders visit the department website.

For more information about the Cleft Palate Foundation click here.

Jan 172014
 

The College of Allied Health Science is adding a fourth certificate to the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies with the new certificate in military and trauma counseling (MTC) program.

The program will prepare graduate students enrolled in counselor education programs to work effectively with the psychosocial and mental health needs of military personnel, veterans, disabled veterans, and their families. Students will also acquire the knowledge and skills to work effectively with those who have experienced civilian trauma.

Makr Stebnicki, professor in the Department of Addictions & Rehabilitation Studies and coordinator of the new MTC certificate

Mark Stebnicki, professor in the Department of Addictions & Rehabilitation Studies and coordinator of the new MTC certificate

“More than two million American troops have deployed to the Middle East since September 11, 2001 in support of the Global War on Terror,” said Dr. Mark Stebnicki, professor and Coordinator of the Military and Trauma Counseling Certificate, “More servicemen and women are surviving combat injuries than ever before due to improved battlefield medicine, post-operative medical technology, and better body armor. Many have experienced catastrophic physical injuries/disabilities (i.e., traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and amputations) and serious mental health concerns (i.e., post traumatic stress, substance abuse, and behavioral addictions).”

Stebnicki added that transitioning from active duty to civilian life requires a unique understanding of the medical, physical, psychological, and career needs of the individual service member, as well as family members, and significant others. The new certificate will provide graduates with the skills needed to aid military personnel and veterans with that transition.

“There are unique differences in counseling persons in community mental health versus military and veteran settings,” said Stebnicki, “Because of these differences, the MTC program specializes in training students how to work competently in the diagnosis, therapeutic interventions, and rehabilitation treatment planning of service men and women who are transitioning from active duty to civilian life.”

Providing services such as these for military personnel is a large focus in the department. Dr. Paul Toriello, the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Services chair secured an $828,956 grant from the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services to help equip the Operation Re-Entry van with satellite communication and new telehealth technology that provides clinical care long-distance.

(L-R) Jim Menke, project manager for Operation Re-entry North Carolina, and Dr. Paul Toriello, chair of the ECU Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies, worked together on the grant project that equipped the Operation Re-entry van with technology to serve veterans and their families in their own communities. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

(L-R) Jim Menke, project manager for Operation Re-entry North Carolina, and Dr. Paul Toriello, chair of the ECU Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies, worked together on the grant project that equipped the Operation Re-entry van with technology to serve veterans and their families in their own communities. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

With the new equipment, the Operation Re-Entry van can deliver medical, psychiatric and behavioral health services in an ambulatory unit that can travel to veterans and their families instead of making them travel for services.

To be eligible for the MTC certificate program students must be admitted by the Graduate School as a degree or certificate student and meet the minimum admission criteria including a letter of intent, a GPA of 2.7, and consent of the MTC Program Coordinator.

The courses that are required with the MTC certificate program are:

REHB 6000- Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (3): Functional capacities of individuals with disabilities, impact of disability on individual, and personal and social adjustment to life.

REHB 6100- Occupational Analysis and Career Counseling (3): Current occupational, vocational, career counseling, and career development theories and practices related to persons with and without disabilities across the life-span.

REHB 6375- Military and Trauma Counseling (3): Focuses on providing assessment, counseling, rehabilitation, and transitional services to individuals and families in the military, veterans, and/or trauma survivors.

Additionally, students are required to complete one three (3) semester hour elective approved by the MTC certificate program Coordinator.

For more information contact Dr. Mark Stebnicki, MTC program coordinator-email: stebnickim@ecu.edu, telephone: 252.744.6295. For more extensive information on the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation visit our website at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/rehb/index.cfm .

Dec 132013
 

With technology ever-changing, the College of Allied Health Sciences is leading the way for the University with new equipment in a Allied Health Sciences building classroom that will open up new possibilities for professors and students alike.

“Fall semester saw the introduction to a new room setup and during winter break more of our rooms will benefit from this same technology,” said Jean Merenda, educational technology specialist.

The new technology is controlled by a Crestron touch screen monitor that allows for full integration of Microsoft “Ink” tools. Through this tool, professors can use a stylus to take notes directly on the screen during a presentation, highlighting key points and adding thoughts that can be saved for viewing later on.

TouchscreenSmall

With the easy-to-use software, switching between different sources such as laptops, iPads or USB drives will be much easier and fluid, cutting down the time devoted to setting up for a lecture or presentation. Now professors and students can switch between devices seamlessly with minimum interruption time.

Also featured in the new classroom design is a state-of-the-art document camera with a high resolution than the ones currently being used in classrooms, and also takes up less room on the podium.

JeanScreenGroup

Faculty from Health Services & Information Management look on as Jean Merenda from the office of educational technology demonstrates how to use the new touch panel.

Classroom 1345 is also equipped with a “bridge” system which will enable instructors to use the in-room camera for Skype and WebConferencing sessions.  Through this technology, students can conference with other classes across the state, or enjoy a guest lecturers without travel expense.  This technology will soon be available for all classrooms that currently have in-room cameras.

Air Media software will be a standard in the classroom as well and will allow students to connect and project from their personal devices. Through this software, students can easily share without having to disconnect one laptop and plugging in another to project on the screen.

“One of the neatest additions is the Air Media software which will enable students to share their desktops without leaving their seat,” said Merenda.

VideoninScreen

Jean Merenda shows faculty how to utilize the in-room camera for recording and Skype sessions.

The new software is a great addition to the College of Allied Health Sciences and will assist in making lectures more accessible and interactive. For more information about technology in the College of Allied Health Sciences, visit the “OET for CAHS” blog at http://blog.ecu.edu/sites/OET/.