Nov 182014
 

Eighty-eight East Carolina University faculty and staff were honored Nov. 11 for their published works at the William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library’s annual Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards ceremony.

Faculty and staff submitted 240 entries including 206 peer-reviewed journal articles, 21 book chapters and 13 books published between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014.

“The awards pay tribute to those who expand the scholarly work of the university and the research reputation of the Division of Health Sciences through their published works,” said Dr. Gregory Hassler, interim director of Laupus Library. “We express gratitude to our authors for their hard work and impressive scholarship.”

The library hosted the awards ceremony and dinner reception for honorees at the Greenville Hilton. The event was co-sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library, which provide needed support for special programs and activities of the library.

Other sponsors were Matthews Book Company, Dr. John Papalas, Springer, Dr. and Mrs. Donald Hoffman, Dr. and Mrs. Dan Shingleton, Dr. Lorrie Basnight, Dr. Greg Hassler, Dr. Jackie Hutcherson, Dr. and Mrs. James Hallock, Eastern Carolina Foot and Ankle Specialists, Dr. and Mrs. Jon Tingelstad, The little bank, Drs. Bob Thompson and Marie Pokorny, Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eakin, Dr. Mary Raab, Mr. Dwain Teague and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rogers.

Authors recognized in the College of Allied Health Sciences were Jason Brinkley, Leigh W. Cellucci, Martha Chapin, Anne Dickerson, Denise Donica, Elizabeth Forrestal, Susie Harris, Robert Kulesher, Jane Patton, Balaji Rangarathnam, Leonard Trujillo, and Heather Harris Wright.

The Brody School of Medicine authors were Abdel Abdel-Rahman, Emily Askew, Yan-Hua Chen, W. Randolph Chitwood Jr., David Collier, Irma Corral, Kay Craven, Doyle Cummings, Paul Cunningham, Moahad Dar, Ronald Dudek, Chris Duffrin, Clinton Faulk, Jonathon Firnhaber, Annette Greer, Eleanor Harris, Katherine Jones, Gregory D. Kearney, Susan Keen, Brett Keiper, Cheryl Knudson, Warren Knudson, Kathryn Kolasa, Brandon Kyle, Hope Landrine, Suzanne Lea, Myon-Hee Lee, Darla Liles, Qun Lu, Robert Lust, Christopher Mansfield, Laura Matarese, William Meggs, Assad Movahed, Rajasekhar Nekkanti, Ronald Perkin, Stephanie Pitts, Walter Pories, Stephanie Richards, Jacques Robidoux, Rachel Roper,  Maria J. Ruiz-Echevarria, Susan Schmidt, George Sigounas, Robert Tanenberg, Danielle Walsh, David Weismiller and Li Yang.

The School of Dental Medicine authors were Carol Anderson, Grishondra Branch-Mays, Joseph Califano, Gregory Chadwick, C. Ervin Davis, Waldemar de Rijk, James Hupp, Lamont Lowery, Linda May, John Stockstill, and Margaret Wilson.

The Laupus Health Sciences Library authors were Kathy Cable and Carrie Forbes.

Those recognized in the College of Nursing were Sylvia Brown, Robin Webb Corbett, Patricia Crane, Martha Engelke, Laura Gantt, Sonya R. Hardin, Candace Harrington, D. Elizabeth Jesse, Ann King, Nanette Lavoie-Vaughan, Michele Mendes, Janice Neil, Elaine Scott, and Melvin Swanson.

Highlighting the awards ceremony was the presentation of the Laupus Medallion to seven book authors. The Medallion is a smaller version of the Laupus Bronze sculpture which hangs in the atrium of the health sciences building at the entrance to the Laupus Library. Both the Bronze and Medallion were designed by Hanna Jubran and Jodi Hollnagel-Jubran of ECU’s School of Art and Design.  This year’s book authors are Leigh Cellucci (CAHS), W. Randolph Chitwood (BSOM), Ronald Dudek (BSOM), Carrie Forbes (LL), James Hupp (SODM), William Meggs (BSOM) and Laura Matarese (BSOM.

A copy of the bibliography is available on the Library’s website www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/HSAR with additional information and photographs from the event.

 

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Oct 072014
 

The College of Allied Health Sciences celebrated homecoming weekend at East Carolina University Oct. 3 with a reception held in the Health Sciences Building lobby. With over 150 alumni, faculty, staff and friends of the College registered to attend, the building was full of excited patrons exploring the various departments and enjoying a “treasure hunt” throughout the College.

Dean Stephen Thomas and Director of Development Pat Frede embrace after he learns the Leadership Legacy Student Fund  has been renamed to the Dr. Stephen W. Thomas Leadership Legacy Student Fund.

Dean Stephen Thomas and Director of Development Pat Frede embrace after he learns the Leadership Legacy Student Fund has been renamed to the Dr. Stephen W. Thomas Leadership Legacy Student Fund.

The CAHS homecoming event began with a reception in the lobby where guests were treated with a performance from the ECU women’s a Capella group, The Magnolia Belles. Following welcoming remarks from Dean Stephen Thomas, who celebrated his last homecoming with the College before his upcoming retirement and Sydney Humphreys, student liaison to the Dean, Director of Development Pat Frede took the podium to present Dr. Thomas with a surprise.  The CAHS Advancement Council along with the Medical and Health Sciences Foundation has renamed the Student Leadership Legacy Fund to the Dr. Stephen W. Thomas Leadership Legacy Student Fund.  Dr. Thomas said he was made “speechless” by the honor and was grateful that a fund he feels so passionate about now holds his name.

After hearing instructions for the evening from Dr. Kathleen Cox, department chair in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, representatives from the ECU Ambassadors and CAHS Student Leaders Council led those in attendance throughout the College to learn more about each department and see presentations from faculty and students. The Operation Re-Entry van, a grant-funded mobile clinic that aids veterans across eastern North Carolina in the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies was also available in the parking lot for tours and demonstrations. Alumni also used the homecoming event to meet up with fellow members of their graduating class. The Department of Physical Therapy class of 211984 had a reunion after the general reception with around 20 members of the class and faculty from that time enjoying a tour of the PT labs before gathering for dinner.  Many of the alumni were surprised and thrilled to see the new advances in technology available for students since their years in the program.

At the end of the event, everyone who toured through the departments and marked off their “treasure map” was able to pick some “pirate booty” from the CAHS treasure chest of goodies donated by each department.

View more photos from the event at www.ecu.edu/ah/news2.cfm.

Sep 192014
 

The College of Allied Health Sciences is planning for two big events in October, the 44th Annual Meta M. Downes Speech-Language and Hearing Symposium and the Health Informatics Career and Internship Symposium.

Downes SymposiumThe Downes Symposium, sponsored by the East Carolina University Chapter of the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association in cooperation with the ECU Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSDI) and Eastern AHEC, will enable learners to increase knowledge and skills needed to work with individuals with communication impairments and their families. The target audience includes speech-language pathologists, audiologists, students, and all interested others.

The theme for this year’s symposium is “Developing Evidence Based Treatment for Childhood Articulation Disorders and Vocabulary and Literacy Development in Latino Preschoolers” and will feature lectures from CSDI faculty members Lucia Mendez and Yolanda Holt. Along with development activities based on the symposium theme, those in attendance will also learn more about evidence-based practices, posing clinical questions, impact of variations in classification of disorders, and the link between vocabulary and literacy.

This annual professional development event will be held Oct. 17 from 8:30 a.m to 4:30 p.m.at the East Carolina Heart Institute with registration beginning at 8 a.m. For more information view the brochure.

The Health Informatics Career and Internship is a collaborative effort between Duke Center for Health Informatics, the Department of Health Service and Information Management at East Carolina University College of HI Flyer with Big LogosAllied Health Sciences, East Carolina University College of Business, the School of Library and Information Sciences at North Carolina Central University, the Carolina Health Informatics Program at University of North Carolina, and the Health Informatics Professional Science program at UNC-Charlotte.

Spear-headed by the Department of Health Services and Information Management at ECU (HSIM), this event will provide a venue for students and the general public to learn about practicum opportunities, the latest research trends and developments in health industries and job opportunities in the health informatics field. At the fair, students will also have the opportunity to meet and get to know potential employers.

Along with hearing from keynote speaker Lynne Thomas Gordan, chief executive officer of the American Health Information Management Association, those in attendance will also have the opportunity to participate in panel discussions on topics such as transitioning into health informatics, careers in health informatics and perspectives in health informatics. Panelists and moderators include faculty from all participating universities as well as employers and students.

The Health Informatics Career and Internship Symposium/Fair will be held Oct. 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with registration beginning at 9:30 a.m. in the East Carolina Heart Institute. for more information visit www.hicareerfair.com.

 

 

Sep 022014
 

The Academy of Community Engagement Scholarship (ACES) board of directors has invited Dr. Beth Velde, director of strategic planning & the Mills Symposium for the College of Allied Health Sciences, to become an inaugural member of the Academy.

Dr. Beth Velde

Dr. Velde was nominated and selected by peers because of her practice and model of excellence in collaboration with communities and the university while addressing critical issues of mutual benefit. She will be inducted to the Academy Oct. 7 at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium.

The mission of the Academy of Engaged Scholarship (ACES) is to assist in improving the physical, social, civic and economic well-being of communities by advancing scholarship based on collaborative discovery by communities and their higher education partners. To do so, ACES selects persons in communities and higher education institutions who have been recognized by their peers as exceptional in their accomplishments in engagement to serve as members. These members then draw on that expertise to further the application of engagement for addressing the challenges and opportunities of community and higher education partners.  Members selected will also have the opportunity to serve the greater good by advancing community engagement scholarship and advancing community-engaged disciplinary and transdisciplinary scholarly activities and knowledge to address regional, national, and global issues. 

ACES explores critical and complex societal and community issues and provides recommendations, upon request, to inform local, regional, national, and international research and policy agendas using input and valuable data gathered through the involvement of leading community engagement scholars, community engagement partners, and knowledgeable community counterparts.

At the forefront of ACES’ mission is the need to ensure that all scholarly activities and policy initiatives keep in mind the needs of the constituents involved. Through their transparency, willingness to involve all groups in their practices, and encouragement of shared authority, ACES serves as a representative voice of allied groups in the field of engagement.

Beth Velde, PhD is a professor emerita within the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University and chair of the APLU’s Council on Engagement and Outreach. She directs the ECU Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy which prepares ECU faculty,  graduate students and ECU scholars to partner with communities and conduct research that is important and relevant to the communities. Her research includes the culture of engagement at ECU, the perceptions of community partners regarding the roles and responsibilities of telling the story of community engagement, and the synergies between leadership and public service. She leads the ECU team for the Carnegie engaged university designation and chaired the working groups responsible for the SACS narratives on public service and community engagement.

Learn more about the Academy of Engagement Scholarship at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium website here.

Aug 152014
 

If you walk by the Department of Physician Assistant Studies lab in the College of Allied Health Sciences, you may notice someone lying alone on a hospital bed. Don’t be alarmed, our students haven’t abandoned an ailing patient, that’s just the new patient simulator waiting for the next round of students to practice medical procedures and diagnoses skills with him.

(L-R) PA faculty members Kim Stokes, Natalie Smith, Julie Daniel-Yount, and Jane Trapp work on the patient simulator during the faculty training session.

(L-R) PA faculty members Kim Stokes, Natalie Smith, Julie Daniel-Yount, and Jane Trapp work on the patient simulator during the faculty training session.

This newest simulation tool effectively prepares PA students for their field by allowing them to act out patient scenarios in a controlled environment. The Laerdal SimMan Essentials patient simulator, which has been named “Sammy” by the the PA department, can present several different types of symptoms including dilated pupils, increased heart rate, strange lung sounds, and many other diagnosable issues. With pulse points in five different locations, eyes that blink, and several other life-like features, “Sammy” is as “real” as a patient can be without actually being alive.

“Simulation is a wonderful way for students to practice in a virtual environment where mistakes can be made and learned from without affecting real patients,” said Dr. Alan Gindoff, chair of the Department.

With a panel in the arm of the SimMan, students can place IVs and administer drugs for treatment.

With a panel in the arm of the SimMan, students can place IVs and administer drugs for treatment.

Once a faculty member has used the wireless, touch-screen monitor to give the simulator a certain ailment, PA students then actually perform a physical examination, diagnose the problem and carry-out a treatment plan. With this method of learning, PA students can learn skills hands-on such as how to intubate, treat a pneumothorax (collapsed lung), perform an intraosseous infusion into the bone marrow of the simulator’s knee and chest, and administer drugs intravenously.

The patient simulator monitor tracks the heart rate, oxygen stats and blood pressure of the SimMan, similar to that of a hospital monitor. With this advanced technology, PA students are able to actually carry out diagnoses and treatments with a “patient” that reacts to their courses of action versus simply planning and discussing them . Also with the monitor, faculty is able to change and customize the SimMan’s condition at the touch of a button during the treatment, such as increasing his heart-rate, decreasing his oxygen levels or distending his abdomen.

With interchangeable and customizable parts, the SimMan can allow for several different types of scenarios that help prepare PA students for obstacles in the medical field, whether that is a swollen tongue making intubation difficult or a sudden need for CPR.

“Through simulation, student can apply medical management in near real-life scenarios so they may develop complex skill sets before they actually perform them on human beings,” said Gindoff, “This is unlike a multiple choice test where the answers are in front of you, waiting to be chosen from a list. This is like real-life where you have to use your knowledge to diagnose a variety of symptoms and what those symptoms may mean when presented all together.”

The touch-screen monitor displays active medical conditions and allows faculty to control the patient simulator's symptoms and reactions to treatment.

The touch-screen monitor displays active medical conditions and allows faculty to control the patient simulator’s symptoms and reactions to treatment.

Through patient simulators, the Department of Physician Assistant studies is effectively preparing students for the medical field. “Sammy” may be just a patient simulator, but through his life-like symptoms and various diagnoses, he is training future PAs for real life patients.