Mar 172014
 
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Students take the nursing pledge during the annual ceremony.

The East Carolina University College of Nursing introduced first-year nursing students to the profession at its spring Lamp of Learning ceremony on March 6.

Each student received a pin that symbolizes their commitment to nursing to wear throughout their undergraduate career. The ceremony derives its name from the pins, which are shaped like a lamp of learning and meant to remind students that they are lifelong learners who take responsibility for themselves and their patients.

The lamp also is one of the primary icons illustrated on the ECU nursing pin, which each student receives upon graduation. Dean Sylvia Brown described the meaning behind ECU’s nursing pin. Created by the college’s first graduating class in 1964, she said the shield-shaped pin represents the values the college holds dear: love, compassion, understanding and knowledge.

“I hope that all of you will think of those characteristics as you’re studying in our program and once you go out into practice,” Brown told the students, “and that you’ll be proud to be an ECU pirate nurse.”

The Lamp of Learning ceremony included a welcome from nursing faculty members and the president-elect of the Beta Nu chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the international honor society of nursing. Attendees also learned about the college’s Student Emergency Needs Fund. The fund is made possible through a monetary gift that Brown makes in the name of each first-year student and is meant to support students facing unexpected emergency expenses. Students then took the nursing pledge and gathered with faculty to enjoy cupcakes.

“It felt like kind of an initiation to nursing school,” Rebecca Moye, a first-year student from Goldsboro, said about the event. “It’s reassuring to hear them say how big a deal it is and what an honor it is to be in nursing school, especially at ECU.”

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Feb 282014
 

About 20 East Carolina University nursing students helped fit elementary students with new bicycle helmets to encourage safe rides on Feb. 26.

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Nursing students Paige Eming and Karina Dierolf check the helmet’s fit.

The undergraduate students, led by College of Nursing clinical instructor Rachelle Denney, worked with 125 fourth-graders at Ridgewood Elementary School in Winterville. The students are in a pediatric clinical rotation this semester.

The event was sponsored by the Eastern Carolina Injury Prevention Program and Safe Communities Coalition of Pitt County at Vidant Medical Center.

The injury prevention office usually works in about six to eight schools and fits helmets for 800 to 1,000 students annually, said Jennifer Smith, manager of the program.

Many parents and children are not aware of local and state laws about helmets and why it’s important to wear a helmet.

On July 5, 2001, North Carolina enacted the Child Bicycle Safety Act. The law requires every person under 16 years old to wear an approved bicycle helmet when operating a bicycle on any public road, public bicycle path or other public right-of-way.

The purpose of the law is to reduce the number of head-related injuries and deaths from bicycle crashes. Studies show that helmets prevent 60 percent of head injury deaths and reduce the overall risk of head injuries by 85 percent. Every year, about 300,000 kids go to the emergency department because of bike injuries, and at least 10,000 kids have injuries that require a hospital stay. For more information, call Smith at 252-847-8668.

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Nursing student Charles Mosley adjusts the strap for a Ridgewood elementary student.

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ECU College of Nursing student Anna Bunch chooses a helmet for a student.

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Jan 142014
 
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Dr. Sylvia T. Brown

East Carolina University’s graduate program in nursing ranks among the nation’s best in online education according to a recent listing by U.S. News & World Report.

The ECU College of Nursing ranked fifth out of 96 online masters of nursing programs in the country.

U.S. News ranked online master’s degree programs in business, computer information technology, education, engineering and nursing on criteria including student engagement, faculty credentials and training, admissions selectivity, student services and technology and program ratings by peer institutions.

Nursing has been a leader in distance education on campus and since 2004 has been recognized by U.S. News as one of the largest distance education programs in the country. The current rankings assess quality categories over size.

“Our programs offer today’s working nurse the ability to pursue advanced education while remaining in the much-needed workforce,” said Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the ECU College of Nursing. “Our administrators, faculty and staff are committed to preparing nursing professionals who are making a positive impact on the health care of individuals in our region and around the world.”

Nursing offers seven online options in the master’s of science nursing program: adult-gerontology nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, family nurse practitioner, neonatal nurse practitioner, nursing education, nursing leadership and nurse midwifery. ECU offers the only nurse midwifery curriculum in North Carolina. 

Of 723 total students enrolled in the MSN program in the 2012-2013 academic year, 628 – or 86.9 percent – were distance education students.

One way in which the College of Nursing is using technology to enhance education is a web-based Virtual Community Clinic Learning Environment, a format similar to the popular Second Life virtual world, which creates case-based, health care scenarios for students to solve.

This is the second year that U.S. News has compiled numeric rankings on the overall quality of distance education programs. Nursing ranked 10th last year. The complete listing can be viewed at http://www.usnews.com/online. Highlights also will appear in the magazine’s “Best Graduate Schools 2015” and “Best Colleges 2015” printed guidebooks.

 

Dec 102013
 

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Staff and faculty members from the College of Nursing have been bringing cheer to senior adults this holiday season.

More than a dozen faculty and staff decorated 13 wreaths and 26 stockings for residents at Golden Living Center in Greenville during a fall community service day on Nov. 1. They also raised funds to provide a gift card for a family in need.

The holiday decorations were delivered Friday, Dec. 6 in time for the staff at Golden Living Center to decorate for the annual holiday open house held Dec. 8.

The project planning committee was Traci Baer, Kuan Chen, Rachel Cherrier, Nik Fishel, Casey Holland, Lisa Ormond and Brenda Smith.

Nursing faculty and staff plan to do another service event in the spring.

 

Nov 222013
 

 

military panel Beta Nu banquet Nov 2013

Military officers and nurse leaders at the banquet were, left to right: Captain L. Pearson, director of nursing services at Camp Lejeune; Colonel Eleanor C. Nazar-Smith, commander of the 4th Medical Group, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base; and Colonel Kendra P. Whyatt, deputy commander for patient services at Womack Army Medical Center.

On Nov. 21, the East Carolina University College of Nursing’s Beta Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau hosted a military panel with representatives from the Army, Navy and Air Force during a fall banquet at the Greenville Hilton.

Senior nurse leaders discussed their specific medical mission, nursing roles, current challenges, and successes. The intent was to raise awareness about military nursing.

The College of Nursing’s Dr. Donna Lake (Colonel, USAF Retired) facilitated the discussion to show the diversity in military nursing and stimulate thought on how ECU nursing faculty and students can partner with Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune, and Seymour Johnson Air Force Base nurses. Each speaker shared a wealth of knowledge about nursing in various settings from more than 60 years of military nursing experience collectively.

The Joining Forces national initiative was started in 2012 by First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden to support and honor America’s service members and their families. The initiative aims to educate and spark action from citizens, communities, businesses, and schools to ensure military families have the support they have earned. The campaign focuses on three key priority areas - employment, education, and wellness - while engaging in a comprehensive effort to raise awareness about the service, sacrifice, and needs of military families.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing partnered with the American Nurses Association, National League for Nursing and the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing to engage nursing schools nationwide, including ECU, in the Joining Forces campaign.

A special military tradition was demonstrated at the ECU banquet called “The White Table or POW/MIA Table,” which symbolizes a military family member who is missing at the dinner table. The small, unoccupied table is a familiar sight at military special events. No one ever sits at the table; it pays tribute to military veterans who cannot be there due to their sacrifice in defense of freedom.