Aug 052014
 

This summer Laupus Technology Services is working hard to provide great new resources for our patrons.

GetChargedMachineIf you’ve ever experienced your phone battery dying while on campus, you might like this solution: Laupus Library is now offering Kwikboost charging stations. The stations provide a secure way to store and charge your cell phone or mobile device while you study or go to class. Connect the charging cable to your device in an empty bay and set a custom pin number on the front of the locker. Your phone will securely charge until you return.

The stations accommodate the latest Android and Apple devices, and provide Apple 30 pin connectors, lightning connectors, micro USB and mini USB connectors for older mobile devices.

Three six-bay charging stations have been installed throughout the library in easy-to-find locations.

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Jul 012014
 

“We had a class several times a week at night given by the Chicago Modeling Agency to teach us manners, how to walk properly, etc. At the time we hated it, but it was useful later.” – Nancy Thar Fiedler

Imagine having to take a modeling class as part of nursing training. As far-fetched as the idea seems in today’s world of theory and clinical-based instruction, Nancy Thar Fiedler, a 1960 graduate of the Evanston Hospital School of Nursing, shares her experience in the new display, “Nursing School Memories: Nursing Education in the Mid-20th Century,” currently on view at East Carolina University’s Family Medicine Center in Greenville.

The exhibit is located on the second floor across from the elevators in the Family Medicine Center, 101 Heart Drive. Memorabilia from Fiedler’s nursing school experience are featured along with objects, photographs and archival documents from the collections of The Country Doctor Museum. The items help tell a story of shared camaraderie of nursing school students as they advanced through rigorous programs marked by enduring traditions, high expectations and long hours.

The exhibit focuses on the history of three-year diploma training programs at local hospitals from 1940-1960. While attending classes, nursing students were scheduled to work in hospital wards and received on-the-job training.

Nursing school traditions including capping ceremonies, the awarding of class pins and lighting of Florence Nightingale lamps which signified students’ progress to graduation. These events occurred at nursing schools across the county and were augmented by banquets and graduation events to form an identity unique to each school of nursing. Caps, Florence Nightingale lamps, invitations and a junior class banquet poster from the Rex School of Nursing in Raleigh (circa 1947-1948) are on view in the exhibit.

By 1960, four-year baccalaureate degree programs were becoming more popular. By the end of the 1970s, most three-year diploma programs had closed and student nurses were pursuing their two or four-year nursing degrees at colleges and universities. An early style of ECU’s nursing uniform, cap and pin design also are on display to highlight the growing difference between hospital and university-based programs. Dr. Frances Eason and Dr. Kathleen Sitzman of ECU’s College of Nursing graciously reviewed the content and scope of the exhibit.

Fiedler considered nursing to be “a profession of dedication” when she entered nursing school in the late 1950s. Many would agree this description is still true today. The Country Doctor Museum invites you to take a few minutes to see this new exhibit in ECU’s Family Medicine Center.

Annie Anderson

The Country Doctor Museum

The Country Doctor Museum, located in Bailey, is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday. All tours are guided and available every hour on the hour from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Group tours can be arranged. For more information, visit http://www.countrydoctormuseum.org

 

 

 

Jun 062014
 

Lord Voldemort’s plot to steal the Philosopher’s stone.  The basilick.  Befriending Dragons.  Unicorns.  The Centaur Firenze. Was it all J.K. Rowling’s fantasy – or is a bit of history behind the magic of Harry Potter?

On June 9, Laupus Library opens an exciting exhibit that begs the question. “Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine” will explore the world of Harry Potter and the hocus-pocus of the Renaissance era that inspired it.

“In 1997, British author J.K. Rowling introduced the world to Harry Potter and a literary phenomenon was born.  Although a fantasy story, the magic in the Harry Potter books is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science and medicine.

The exhibit will display and explore potions, monsters, herbology, magical creatures, fantastic beasts and immortality. It will also feature the works of Renaissance-era science, magic and medicine figures like Nicolas Flamel, Konrad Genser and Agrippa von Nettesheim.”

Laupus extends an invitation to everyone – especially Harry Potter fans.  Attendees are encouraged to dress in Harry Potter character attire. The exhibit opens on June 9 at 8:00 a.m. and remains free and open to the public through July 19.

The exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. For more information: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/about/exhibition/harrypotter-bookinfo.html.

Kelly R. Dilda
Public Communications Specialist
Laupus Library

Apr 042014
 

Socrates said, “Education is the kindling of the flame, not the filling of a vessel.”

This notion might ring especially true for graduate students seeking dissertation inspiration: How to sum up years of learning in one final – and very important – assignment?  The thought can be overwhelming. But it only takes a spark to get a fire going.

At Laupus Library, we regularly seek and adapt new resources that help pass the learning torch and ignite bright new ideas.  Some of the best tools we offer are those that expose ECU Health Sciences students and faculty to the unique insights of their educational counterparts from other times, cultures and practice areas.

ProQuest Dissertations and Thesis Global, the most comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses from around the world, is such a resource. And beginning today through May 1, Laupus Library is pleased to offer our students and faculty trial access to the collection, which is searched over 200 million times a year by researchers from more than 3,000 leading academic institutions worldwide.

Its coverage spans from the 18th century to the present day and includes full text for graduate works added since 1997, along with selected full text for works written prior to 1997. It contains a significant amount of new international dissertations and theses both in citations and in full text.

We feel confident this robust new collection will inspire our graduate in these final weeks of second semester, and beyond.

–Kelly R. Dilda
Laupus Library

Feb 112014
 

Budding health care professionals at the ECU Division of Health Sciences can now get a closer look at the human bodies they’ll soon be treating – without having to step foot in a clinic.

For a limited time, Laupus Library is providing students and faculty with full premium access to e-Anatomy, the most complete atlas of human anatomy available. During this trial period, the DHS community can explore the complete database of images, scans, and 40 section-specific image modules not available through the free version we normally host.

Medical and allied health students in particular will enjoy having more than 375,000 anatomic structures and a plethora of images – including CT, MRI, Radiographs, Anatomic diagrams and nuclear images – at their fingertips. The interactive collection gives users an up-close look into thousands of labelled anatomical parts they will examine as healthcare professionals.

The full version of e-Anatomy can be viewed by DHS students and faculty here: https://www.lib.ecu.edu/databases/view/137. We encourage students and faculty to take full advantage of this opportunity, as we will be gathering feedback before the trial ends at the end of February. Feedback can be sent via liaisons or direct to Beth Ketterman at kettermane@ecu.edu.

–Kelly R. Dilda
Laupus Library