Jun 062014
 

Lord Voldemort’s plot to steal the Philosopher’s stone.  The basilick.  Befriending Dragons.  Unicorns.  The Centaur Firenze. Was it all J.K. Rowling’s fantasy – or is a bit of history behind the magic of Harry Potter?

On June 9, Laupus Library opens an exciting exhibit that begs the question. “Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine” will explore the world of Harry Potter and the hocus-pocus of the Renaissance era that inspired it.

“In 1997, British author J.K. Rowling introduced the world to Harry Potter and a literary phenomenon was born.  Although a fantasy story, the magic in the Harry Potter books is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science and medicine.

The exhibit will display and explore potions, monsters, herbology, magical creatures, fantastic beasts and immortality. It will also feature the works of Renaissance-era science, magic and medicine figures like Nicolas Flamel, Konrad Genser and Agrippa von Nettesheim.”

Laupus extends an invitation to everyone – especially Harry Potter fans.  Attendees are encouraged to dress in Harry Potter character attire. The exhibit opens on June 9 at 8:00 a.m. and remains free and open to the public through July 19.

The exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. For more information: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/about/exhibition/harrypotter-bookinfo.html.

Kelly R. Dilda
Public Communications Specialist
Laupus Library

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Apr 042014
 

Socrates said, “Education is the kindling of the flame, not the filling of a vessel.”

This notion might ring especially true for graduate students seeking dissertation inspiration: How to sum up years of learning in one final – and very important – assignment?  The thought can be overwhelming. But it only takes a spark to get a fire going.

At Laupus Library, we regularly seek and adapt new resources that help pass the learning torch and ignite bright new ideas.  Some of the best tools we offer are those that expose ECU Health Sciences students and faculty to the unique insights of their educational counterparts from other times, cultures and practice areas.

ProQuest Dissertations and Thesis Global, the most comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses from around the world, is such a resource. And beginning today through May 1, Laupus Library is pleased to offer our students and faculty trial access to the collection, which is searched over 200 million times a year by researchers from more than 3,000 leading academic institutions worldwide.

Its coverage spans from the 18th century to the present day and includes full text for graduate works added since 1997, along with selected full text for works written prior to 1997. It contains a significant amount of new international dissertations and theses both in citations and in full text.

We feel confident this robust new collection will inspire our graduate in these final weeks of second semester, and beyond.

–Kelly R. Dilda
Laupus Library

Feb 112014
 

Budding health care professionals at the ECU Division of Health Sciences can now get a closer look at the human bodies they’ll soon be treating – without having to step foot in a clinic.

For a limited time, Laupus Library is providing students and faculty with full premium access to e-Anatomy, the most complete atlas of human anatomy available. During this trial period, the DHS community can explore the complete database of images, scans, and 40 section-specific image modules not available through the free version we normally host.

Medical and allied health students in particular will enjoy having more than 375,000 anatomic structures and a plethora of images – including CT, MRI, Radiographs, Anatomic diagrams and nuclear images – at their fingertips. The interactive collection gives users an up-close look into thousands of labelled anatomical parts they will examine as healthcare professionals.

The full version of e-Anatomy can be viewed by DHS students and faculty here: https://www.lib.ecu.edu/databases/view/137. We encourage students and faculty to take full advantage of this opportunity, as we will be gathering feedback before the trial ends at the end of February. Feedback can be sent via liaisons or direct to Beth Ketterman at kettermane@ecu.edu.

–Kelly R. Dilda
Laupus Library

Feb 032014
 

wildlife photog exhibitAn opening reception for a new wildlife photography exhibit in Laupus Library will be held 4:30-6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4 in the library’s fourth floor gallery.

Jerry Lotterhos, professor emeritus in the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies at the College of Allied Health Sciences, presents “Downeast Bugs, Birds, and Butterflies: A Collection of Wildlife Photography.” The exhibit is featured in the library’s Art as Avocation series for spring semester.

Lotterhos will showcase an intimate glimpse into the lives of unique and beautiful creatures. The exhibit will be on display through March 26.

Visitors can view the exhibit located on the fourth floor of Laupus Library during normal operating hours posted at www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary or call 252-744-2219.

Go to the Art as Avocation webpage at www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/events/artasavocation/ to learn more about the artist or future exhibitions.

For more information, call Kelly Rogers Dilda at 252-744-2232 or e-mail rogerske@ecu.edu.

 

 

Jan 242014
 

ECU students and faculty are about to have 5.5 million more papers to read. (Well, if they want to.)

After an extensive evaluation period, Laupus and Joyner libraries have selected Scopus as our new cross-campus research database. The platform hosts 21,000 peer-reviewed journals, trade publications and book series; 5.5 million conference papers; and scholarly articles from more than 3,850 journals and publishers. And with more collections being added regularly, these numbers continue to grow each day.  

Scopus will replace our current provider, Web of Science, after a thorough comparison showed that Scopus better meets the research needs of our growing ECU community. What’s more, the transition will produce cost savings for our library departments, which will help us absorb budget cuts more independently.  

We are excited to soon bring Scopus – the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed research literature in the fields of science, technology, medicine, social sciences and Arts & Humanities – to both the Central and Health Sciences campuses. It’s another example of our library team’s commitment to providing the best technology and resources for the ECU community.

ECU researchers will retain access to the Web of Science through June 30. Following this date, researchers will lose all access to the Web of Science, but they will retain access to Journal Citation Reports and other resources hosted on the Web of Knowledge platform.

For questions or assistance on making the transition to Scopus, please contact an ECU librarian at http://lib.ecu.edu/ask.

–Kelly R. Dilda
Laupus Library