Feb 192015
 
Tap water images

This winter marks the 70th anniversary of community water fluoridation in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) heralded it, “one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th Century” (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013).

The term “community water fluoridation” means fluoride levels are adjusted in an area’s public water supply to help prevent tooth decay and improve oral health. “Water fluoridation reduces tooth decay by about 25% over a person’s lifetime,” (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013).

In 1945, Grand Rapids, Michigan, was the first city in the world to receive additional fluoride in their public water supply (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013). Before this occurred, extensive research was done. Dr. H. Trendley Dean, head of the Dental Hygiene Unit at the National Institutes of Health, was among the first to study fluoride with the help of his research team. After developing a new method of measuring fluoride levels, the team began testing water across the country (Statement on Water Fluoridation, 2004). It was found that fluoride measures up to 1 part per million in drinking water did not cause enamel fluorosis, or brown spots occurring on teeth (Statement on Water Fluoridation, 2004). Then the Michigan Department of Health voted to add fluoride to their drinking water (Statement on Water Fluoridation, 2004).

Today, over 204 million people, 74%, in the United States consume water supplies containing enough fluoride to enhance oral health (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013). In North Carolina, about 87% of people have access to fluoridated water supplies (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013). Charlotte was the first city in the state to fluoridate its water in 1949 (Gerald, 2012). The NC Department of Health and Human Services says dental decay rates in children living in North Carolina were reduced by about 60% after the introduction of fluoridated water in the state.

Several years after the first water fluoridation treatments began in North Carolina; Pitt County started adding fluoride to the area’s water. According to Julius Patrick, Greenville Utility Commission’s Water Treatment Plant Superintendent, Greenville began adding fluoride to water supplies in 1957. He also says Greenville’s water comes from the Tar River which naturally contains .1 mg/l of fluoride. Patrick oversees the team as they filter this water and then add fluoride. In addition, Patrick says the water plant conducts a daily analysis measuring substances in water in parts per billion. This fluoridated water reaches many in the Pitt County area. For example, when the CDC collected data via a fluoridation census in 1992, it was found that over 47,000 Greenville residents were provided with fluoridated water.

Due to the research of the inquisitive Dr. Dean over 70 years ago, the United States will continue to boast more favorable oral hygiene thanks to the discovery of community water fluoridation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jan 122015
 
Goldenliving group photo[1]

The American Student Dental Association (ASDA) is the largest student dental organization in the country. The ECU ASDA focuses on the oral health care needs of older adults. The group is piloting a service project called Smiles for A Lifetime. The project is a multifaceted education and oral screening program dedicated to improving the lives of older adults in the Greenville service area. The students partner with nursing homes, retirement communities, senior centers, and other facilities and programs in the area. To learn more, contact Jennifer Pan, DMD Candidate 2017, at panj13@students.ecu.edu or contact Peggy Novotny, ECU School of Dental Medicine Director of External Affairs, at novotnym@ecu.edu or 252-737-7031.

 

Nov 182014
 

Eighty-eight East Carolina University faculty and staff were honored Nov. 11 for their published works at the William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library’s annual Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards ceremony.

Faculty and staff submitted 240 entries including 206 peer-reviewed journal articles, 21 book chapters and 13 books published between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014.

“The awards pay tribute to those who expand the scholarly work of the university and the research reputation of the Division of Health Sciences through their published works,” said Dr. Gregory Hassler, interim director of Laupus Library. “We express gratitude to our authors for their hard work and impressive scholarship.”

The library hosted the awards ceremony and dinner reception for honorees at the Greenville Hilton. The event was co-sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library, which provide needed support for special programs and activities of the library.

Other sponsors were Matthews Book Company, Dr. John Papalas, Springer, Dr. and Mrs. Donald Hoffman, Dr. and Mrs. Dan Shingleton, Dr. Lorrie Basnight, Dr. Greg Hassler, Dr. Jackie Hutcherson, Dr. and Mrs. James Hallock, Eastern Carolina Foot and Ankle Specialists, Dr. and Mrs. Jon Tingelstad, The little bank, Drs. Bob Thompson and Marie Pokorny, Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eakin, Dr. Mary Raab, Mr. Dwain Teague and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rogers.

Authors recognized in the College of Allied Health Sciences were Jason Brinkley, Leigh W. Cellucci, Martha Chapin, Anne Dickerson, Denise Donica, Elizabeth Forrestal, Susie Harris, Robert Kulesher, Jane Patton, Balaji Rangarathnam, Leonard Trujillo, and Heather Harris Wright.

The Brody School of Medicine authors were Abdel Abdel-Rahman, Emily Askew, Yan-Hua Chen, W. Randolph Chitwood Jr., David Collier, Irma Corral, Kay Craven, Doyle Cummings, Paul Cunningham, Moahad Dar, Ronald Dudek, Chris Duffrin, Clinton Faulk, Jonathon Firnhaber, Annette Greer, Eleanor Harris, Katherine Jones, Gregory D. Kearney, Susan Keen, Brett Keiper, Cheryl Knudson, Warren Knudson, Kathryn Kolasa, Brandon Kyle, Hope Landrine, Suzanne Lea, Myon-Hee Lee, Darla Liles, Qun Lu, Robert Lust, Christopher Mansfield, Laura Matarese, William Meggs, Assad Movahed, Rajasekhar Nekkanti, Ronald Perkin, Stephanie Pitts, Walter Pories, Stephanie Richards, Jacques Robidoux, Rachel Roper,  Maria J. Ruiz-Echevarria, Susan Schmidt, George Sigounas, Robert Tanenberg, Danielle Walsh, David Weismiller and Li Yang.

The School of Dental Medicine authors were Carol Anderson, Grishondra Branch-Mays, Joseph Califano, Gregory Chadwick, C. Ervin Davis, Waldemar de Rijk, James Hupp, Lamont Lowery, Linda May, John Stockstill, and Margaret Wilson.

The Laupus Health Sciences Library authors were Kathy Cable and Carrie Forbes.

Those recognized in the College of Nursing were Sylvia Brown, Robin Webb Corbett, Patricia Crane, Martha Engelke, Laura Gantt, Sonya R. Hardin, Candace Harrington, D. Elizabeth Jesse, Ann King, Nanette Lavoie-Vaughan, Michele Mendes, Janice Neil, Elaine Scott, and Melvin Swanson.

Highlighting the awards ceremony was the presentation of the Laupus Medallion to seven book authors. The Medallion is a smaller version of the Laupus Bronze sculpture which hangs in the atrium of the health sciences building at the entrance to the Laupus Library. Both the Bronze and Medallion were designed by Hanna Jubran and Jodi Hollnagel-Jubran of ECU’s School of Art and Design.  This year’s book authors are Leigh Cellucci (CAHS), W. Randolph Chitwood (BSOM), Ronald Dudek (BSOM), Carrie Forbes (LL), James Hupp (SODM), William Meggs (BSOM) and Laura Matarese (BSOM.

A copy of the bibliography is available on the Library’s website www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/HSAR with additional information and photographs from the event.

 

Nov 062014
 
Colleen Davis 150x150

Colleen K. Davis, DMD candidate 2018, has received a four-year scholarship from the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) to attend the ECU School of Dental Medicine.

The National Health Service Corps, a program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provides financial, professional and educational resources to medical, dental, and mental and behavioral health care providers who bring their skills to areas of the United States with limited access to health care.

Davis entered the ECU School of Dental Medicine in August. She graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in sociology with a minor in Southern Studies. She completed two years of post-baccalaureate studies at Western Carolina University (WCU). While at WCU, she worked as a Career Graduate Fellow in the Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education. She also served as an advanced science and math learning consultant at Southwestern Community College’s Learning Assistance Center.

“I applied to the National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program because I was drawn to its mission of enhancing access to care. I believe that all communities need resources to help maintain oral health, and I want to provide those resources directly as a dental professional,” said Davis. “It is an honor to belong to the national network of health care providers who have been assisted by the program, and I consider it a privilege to represent the NHSC at the School of Dental Medicine.”

Davis grew up in Sylva, N.C., in Jackson County about 45 miles west of Asheville. Her father, Dr. Joe Davis, had a distinguished career as a public health dentist. Upon his retirement, he served as a chief dentist at the Jackson County public health clinic until its closing in the 2014. Sylva and many other communities in the Blue Ridge Mountains are considered health professional shortage areas.

“My hope is to complete a DMD at East Carolina and return to the Sylva area as a primary care dentist,” said Davis.

In June 2014, the ECU School of Dental Medicine opened a community service learning center in Sylva, where fourth-year students, post-doctoral residents, and faculty dentists help meet the oral health needs of Jackson and surrounding counties. Davis hopes to begin serving Sylva patients while completing a rotation at the dental center during her fourth-year.

National Health Service Corps scholarships provide tuition, fees, other educational costs and a living stipend, tax-free, for as many as 4 years in exchange for an equal number of years (2-year minimum) service at an approved facility in a high-need underserved area.

 

Sep 302014
 
  • Brush your teeth for two minutes twice a day.
  • Use a soft bristled brush and replace it every three or four months.
  • Make sure to use an American Dental Association-approved fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss your teeth once a day to remove plaque from between your teeth in areas where the toothbrush cannot reach.
  • Limit between meal snacking.
  • Keep added sugar in your diet to a minimum by making wise food and beverage choices.
  • Include dairy, plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, and water in your diet—they all play a role in your dental health.

Find these and many other oral health tips on the American Dental Association website at www.mouthhealthy.org.

6-18-2014 DentalSchoolJC-129

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students, resident and faculty providers at the ECU School of Dental Medicine offer a full range of dental services at reduced cost for adults and children at these locations:

ECU School of Dental Medicine
Ledyard E. Ross Hall
Greenville, N.C.
Phone 252-737-7834

Ahoskie, N.C.
100 Health Center Drive
Phone 252-332-1904

Elizabeth City, N.C.
1161 North Road Street
Phone 252-331-7225

Lillington, N.C.
80 Autumn Fern Trail
Phone 910-814-4191

Sylva, N.C.
316 County Services Park
Phone 828-586-1200

Visit www.ecu.edu/dental.