Oct 232014
 

If there’s a common characteristic among attendees at the annual East Carolina University College of Nursing scholarship dinner, it’s a passion for helping others. The event brings together private donors who make the academic scholarships possible with the outstanding nursing students who receive their awards.

This year’s recipients were recognized at a ceremony held this fall at the Greenville Hilton Hotel. One hundred and four students received scholarships totaling $220,070 for the 2014-2015 academic year.

College of Nursing Dean Dr. Sylvia Brown thanked donors at the event for enabling students to pursue their dreams of becoming nurses or continuing their education.

“Please know your gifts make a huge difference in our students’ ability to study and meet the demands of the nursing curriculum,” she said.

Charles with 2014 Heather A. Purtee Nursing Scholarship recipient Amy Smith and CON Dean Dr. Sylvia Brown

Charles with 2014 Heather A. Purtee Nursing Scholarship recipient Amy Smith and CON Dean Dr. Sylvia Brown

Many of the scholarships awarded were created to memorialize individuals who have or had exceptional dedication to the field of nursing. The evening event represents a heartwarming opportunity for donors to meet the students who benefit from their financial gifts.

The Voice of the Pirates, Jeff Charles, and his wife, Debby make it a priority to attend the event each year. They created the Heather A. Purtee Nursing Scholarship, a fund named for their daughter who died in a car accident in 1992 while an ECU nursing student.

Charles explained that attending the event is a way to honor his daughter’s life and preserve her memory while at the same time seeing the students who receive the scholarship.

“The College of Nursing was very dear to (Heather),” he said. “We try to award the scholarship to someone who needs financial help. That’s been gratifying to us, that we’re helping these kids.”

To make a donation to a nursing scholarship, contact Major Gifts Officer Mark Alexander at alexanderma@ecu.edu or 252-744-2324.

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Oct 162014
 

East Carolina University’s Medical & Health Sciences Foundation leadership is taking steps to better align their efforts with the aims of the overall health sciences enterprise.

Strategic planning for the foundation kicked off with a retreat in New Bern on Sept. 26-27. Though the university and the ECU Foundation have produced strategic plans with great success, this is the first time the Medical & Health Sciences Foundation has taken on such a project.

“Over the last two years, the (Medical & Health Sciences Foundation) board has become more engaged than ever before,” said Marcy W. Romary, interim president of the foundation. “We want to take the board to the next level by considering how we can be helpful and better engaged with the division.”

She added, “There’s also great competition for dollars today – in the community, in the state and in general. We need to respond to that.”

A preliminary draft of vision, mission, key objectives and strategies for the foundation is scheduled for presentation and revision in October. Carol Mabe, a member of the ECU Board of Trustees, is leading the planning process.

Oct 142014
 

Laupus Library is now offering assistance with systematic reviews (SRs).  Systematic reviews are a form of evidence-based practice with scientific investigations, pre-planned methods and an assembly of original studies as their “subjects.”  These investigations also use strategies to limit bias and random error.

The goal of systematic review is to provide evidence-based healthcare by integrating clinical expertise with the best clinical evidence from systematic research.

“Well-conducted systematic reviews systematically identify, select, assess, and synthesize the relevant body of research, and will help make clear what is known and not known about the potential benefits and harms of alternative drugs, devices, and other healthcare services. Thus, systematic reviews of comparative effectiveness research (CER) can be essential for clinicians who strive to integrate research findings into their daily practices, for patients to make well informed choices about their own care, for professional medical societies and other organizations that develop clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), and for payers and policy makers. SRs can also inform medical coverage decisions and be used to set agendas and funding for primary research by highlighting gaps in evidence.” (IOM p. 17.)

The Institute of Medicine recommends working with a librarian or other information specialist to plan out your search strategy and to peer-review the final strategy used.

For more information about this new service please visit: http://libguides.ecu.edu/systematicreviewservice or call 252-744-2219 or 252-744-2230.

References: Institute of Medicine, Eden, J., Laura A. Levit, Alfred O. Berg, & Morton, S. C. 2011. Finding What Works in Health Care: Standards for Systematic Reviews National Academies Press.

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Aug 262014
 
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Two ECU School of Dental Medicine faculty members, Dr. Ervin Davis and Dr. John Stockstill, and others have published a study, “Pain-related worry in patients with chronic orofacial pain,” in the July 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

The researchers explored the prevalence of trait, general, and pain-related worry and the association of worry with high pain levels and other variables. The study found substantial levels of worry among patients and pain-related worry related to higher levels of pain, pain interference, and pain duration. Patients who have pain-related worries may overestimate the seriousness of having pain and think of dire consequences, even feeling their lives will be devastated by pain.

Clinicians treating patients with orofacial pain should assess pain-related worry to understand the effects of their patient’s specific worries on pain and functioning. In addition, patients with substantial worry may be helped by learning techniques and skills to reduce unproductive worry and catastrophizing and improve skills to cope with chronic pain, such as learning distraction techniques, using positive self talk, and continuing activities and interests in spite of pain.

Authors: C. Ervin Davis, MS, PhD; John W. Stockstill, DDS, MS; William D. Stanley, DDS, MS; Qiang Wu, PhD

Dr. Davis is the Unit Chief of Behavioral Sciences and clinical assistant professor in the Department of General Dentistry at the ECU School of Dental Medicine, East Carolina University. Contact: daviscl@ecu.edu.

Dr. Stockstill is Division Director of Orthodontics and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics at the ECU School of Dental Medicine, East Carolina University. Contact: stockstillj@ecu.edu.

Audio Interview

To listen to an audio interview with Dr. Ervin Davis conducted by the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, click here.

Full Text

To read the full text of the publication, click here.

Jun 242014
 

College of Allied Health Sciences Dean Stephen Thomas, on behalf of East Carolina University, received a Navy Employer Support Certificate of Appreciation from Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun during a ceremony at Joint Expeditionary Base (JEB) Little Creek in Norfolk, Va. on June 20.

“I am truly honored to have been nominated for this reserve employer recognition by Pat Frede, our director of development and a proud Navy Veteran and Reservist. It was a privilege to tour the base in Norfolk and witness the demonstrations mostly by reservists and I am grateful to have experienced it.  This recognition is another example, in addition to the Freedom Award received by Chancellor Steve Ballard in 2010, of how ECU continues to remain a military friendly campus,” said Dr. Thomas.

(L-R) Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun with Dr. Thomas' wife, Melodie and Dr. Stephen Thomas after presenting East Carolina University with the Navy Employer Support Certificate of Appreciation. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Hannah Brim/Released)

(L-R) Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun with Dr. Thomas’ wife, Melodie and Dr. Stephen Thomas after presenting East Carolina University with the Navy Employer Support Certificate of Appreciation. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Hannah Brim/Released)

The certificate is presented by the Chief of Navy Reserve annually to recognize selected civilian employers of Navy Reserve Sailors, as nominated by their own citizen-Sailor employees. Selected employers were nominated by their Navy Reserve Sailor employees.

“Employer support is critical to the Navy Reserve mission. Since 9/11, more than 70,000 Reserve Sailors have been mobilized and served around the world – many for multiple tours. In fact, in any given month nearly 25% of our Navy Reserve force is deployed globally. The magnitude of support for the employee by the employer is truly remarkable,” said Vice Adm. Robin R. Braun, Chief of Navy Reserve. “This is our opportunity to thank these outstanding patriots for their support.”

At the beginning of the day, the Chief of Navy Reserve met with Dr. Thomas and 39 other civilian employers of Navy Reserve Sailors from across the nation and presented them with a Certificate of Appreciation for their dedication and support of employees who serve in the Navy Reserve, ensuring that their Sailors are “Always Ready. Anytime, Anywhere.”

Navy Seal Demonstration

Reserve SEAL Team 18 provides a demonstration for the employers recognized June 20 in Norfolk.

Throughout the one-day event employers had the opportunity to get a close up and personal look at the Naval Expeditionary Combat Command, a fast-attack submarine at Submarine Force Atlantic, the USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7) at Naval Station Norfolk, a static display of aircraft from Naval Air Force Reserve, and witness a demonstration by Reserve SEAL Team 18.

Companies invited to this year’s event were nominated by their employees who are also Navy Reserve Sailors. Guests included CEOs, company owners and senior executives from small, medium and large companies who encourage company leadership to promote a culture of pride and recognition in their employees’ service, value their Reserve Sailor/employee and support their service, even when called to duty on short notice, and maintain contact with the Reserve Sailor and their family members when they are on duty for an extended period of time.

“Employers are a key facet of every Reserve Sailor’s life. The service each Sailor provides to the fleet is achieved in no small part due to employer support,” said Braun. “Employer support of our Reserve and Guard forces not only means peace and freedom abroad – it means peace and freedom here at home. It can never be taken for granted. They are critical not just to our readiness, but also to our recruiting, retention and esprit de corps.”

The Navy Employer Recognition Event is an annual Navy familiarization day sponsored by the Chief of Navy Reserve to recognize employers who provide their Reserve Sailors with superior support, and provide them an opportunity to see first-hand what Reserve Sailors do every day. Selected employers are chosen from nominations submitted by their Reserve Sailor employees.