Oct 142014
 

Laupus Library is now offering assistance with systematic reviews (SRs).  Systematic reviews are a form of evidence-based practice with scientific investigations, pre-planned methods and an assembly of original studies as their “subjects.”  These investigations also use strategies to limit bias and random error.

The goal of systematic review is to provide evidence-based healthcare by integrating clinical expertise with the best clinical evidence from systematic research.

“Well-conducted systematic reviews systematically identify, select, assess, and synthesize the relevant body of research, and will help make clear what is known and not known about the potential benefits and harms of alternative drugs, devices, and other healthcare services. Thus, systematic reviews of comparative effectiveness research (CER) can be essential for clinicians who strive to integrate research findings into their daily practices, for patients to make well informed choices about their own care, for professional medical societies and other organizations that develop clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), and for payers and policy makers. SRs can also inform medical coverage decisions and be used to set agendas and funding for primary research by highlighting gaps in evidence.” (IOM p. 17.)

The Institute of Medicine recommends working with a librarian or other information specialist to plan out your search strategy and to peer-review the final strategy used.

For more information about this new service please visit: http://libguides.ecu.edu/systematicreviewservice or call 252-744-2219 or 252-744-2230.

References: Institute of Medicine, Eden, J., Laura A. Levit, Alfred O. Berg, & Morton, S. C. 2011. Finding What Works in Health Care: Standards for Systematic Reviews National Academies Press.

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Aug 262014
 
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Two ECU School of Dental Medicine faculty members, Dr. Ervin Davis and Dr. John Stockstill, and others have published a study, “Pain-related worry in patients with chronic orofacial pain,” in the July 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

The researchers explored the prevalence of trait, general, and pain-related worry and the association of worry with high pain levels and other variables. The study found substantial levels of worry among patients and pain-related worry related to higher levels of pain, pain interference, and pain duration. Patients who have pain-related worries may overestimate the seriousness of having pain and think of dire consequences, even feeling their lives will be devastated by pain.

Clinicians treating patients with orofacial pain should assess pain-related worry to understand the effects of their patient’s specific worries on pain and functioning. In addition, patients with substantial worry may be helped by learning techniques and skills to reduce unproductive worry and catastrophizing and improve skills to cope with chronic pain, such as learning distraction techniques, using positive self talk, and continuing activities and interests in spite of pain.

Authors: C. Ervin Davis, MS, PhD; John W. Stockstill, DDS, MS; William D. Stanley, DDS, MS; Qiang Wu, PhD

Dr. Davis is the Unit Chief of Behavioral Sciences and clinical assistant professor in the Department of General Dentistry at the ECU School of Dental Medicine, East Carolina University. Contact: daviscl@ecu.edu.

Dr. Stockstill is Division Director of Orthodontics and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics at the ECU School of Dental Medicine, East Carolina University. Contact: stockstillj@ecu.edu.

Audio Interview

To listen to an audio interview with Dr. Ervin Davis conducted by the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, click here.

Full Text

To read the full text of the publication, click here.

Jun 242014
 

College of Allied Health Sciences Dean Stephen Thomas, on behalf of East Carolina University, received a Navy Employer Support Certificate of Appreciation from Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun during a ceremony at Joint Expeditionary Base (JEB) Little Creek in Norfolk, Va. on June 20.

“I am truly honored to have been nominated for this reserve employer recognition by Pat Frede, our director of development and a proud Navy Veteran and Reservist. It was a privilege to tour the base in Norfolk and witness the demonstrations mostly by reservists and I am grateful to have experienced it.  This recognition is another example, in addition to the Freedom Award received by Chancellor Steve Ballard in 2010, of how ECU continues to remain a military friendly campus,” said Dr. Thomas.

(L-R) Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun with Dr. Thomas' wife, Melodie and Dr. Stephen Thomas after presenting East Carolina University with the Navy Employer Support Certificate of Appreciation. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Hannah Brim/Released)

(L-R) Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun with Dr. Thomas’ wife, Melodie and Dr. Stephen Thomas after presenting East Carolina University with the Navy Employer Support Certificate of Appreciation. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Hannah Brim/Released)

The certificate is presented by the Chief of Navy Reserve annually to recognize selected civilian employers of Navy Reserve Sailors, as nominated by their own citizen-Sailor employees. Selected employers were nominated by their Navy Reserve Sailor employees.

“Employer support is critical to the Navy Reserve mission. Since 9/11, more than 70,000 Reserve Sailors have been mobilized and served around the world – many for multiple tours. In fact, in any given month nearly 25% of our Navy Reserve force is deployed globally. The magnitude of support for the employee by the employer is truly remarkable,” said Vice Adm. Robin R. Braun, Chief of Navy Reserve. “This is our opportunity to thank these outstanding patriots for their support.”

At the beginning of the day, the Chief of Navy Reserve met with Dr. Thomas and 39 other civilian employers of Navy Reserve Sailors from across the nation and presented them with a Certificate of Appreciation for their dedication and support of employees who serve in the Navy Reserve, ensuring that their Sailors are “Always Ready. Anytime, Anywhere.”

Navy Seal Demonstration

Reserve SEAL Team 18 provides a demonstration for the employers recognized June 20 in Norfolk.

Throughout the one-day event employers had the opportunity to get a close up and personal look at the Naval Expeditionary Combat Command, a fast-attack submarine at Submarine Force Atlantic, the USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7) at Naval Station Norfolk, a static display of aircraft from Naval Air Force Reserve, and witness a demonstration by Reserve SEAL Team 18.

Companies invited to this year’s event were nominated by their employees who are also Navy Reserve Sailors. Guests included CEOs, company owners and senior executives from small, medium and large companies who encourage company leadership to promote a culture of pride and recognition in their employees’ service, value their Reserve Sailor/employee and support their service, even when called to duty on short notice, and maintain contact with the Reserve Sailor and their family members when they are on duty for an extended period of time.

“Employers are a key facet of every Reserve Sailor’s life. The service each Sailor provides to the fleet is achieved in no small part due to employer support,” said Braun. “Employer support of our Reserve and Guard forces not only means peace and freedom abroad – it means peace and freedom here at home. It can never be taken for granted. They are critical not just to our readiness, but also to our recruiting, retention and esprit de corps.”

The Navy Employer Recognition Event is an annual Navy familiarization day sponsored by the Chief of Navy Reserve to recognize employers who provide their Reserve Sailors with superior support, and provide them an opportunity to see first-hand what Reserve Sailors do every day. Selected employers are chosen from nominations submitted by their Reserve Sailor employees.

May 232014
 

Memorial Day weekend marks the traditional start of summer, and an important reminder for water safety.

rwiipw_button_2014_180x150National Recreational Water Illness and Injury Prevention Week, now in is 10th year, focuses on the role swimmers, lifeguards, pool owners and public health officials can take in preventing drowning, pool injuries and outbreaks of water illnesses. It’s a reminder for individuals to help protect themselves and prevent the spread of germs.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recreational water illnesses are caused by germs spread by swallowing, breathing in mists or aerosols or having contact with contaminated water in swimming pools, hot tubs, water parks, water play areas, lakes, rivers or oceans. Diarrhea is the most common illness caused by germs such as norovirus. Skin, ear, respiratory, eye and wound infections also can occur from the germs. Children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems are most at risk. Chlorine and other disinfectants do not kill germs instantly. While most are killed within minutes, a germ called Crypto (short for Cryptosporidium) can live for days. Swallowing just a mouthful of water with germs can make you sick, CDC officials say.

Steps to prevent illness and injury:

  • Don’t swim when you have diarrhea.
  • Shower before and after swimming.
  • Wash your hands after using the toilet or changing diapers.
  • Don’t swallow the water you swim in.
  • Parents of young children should take children on bathroom breaks every 60 minutes or check diapers every 30 to 60 minutes. Change diapers in the bathroom or a diaper-changing area and not at poolside where germs can rinse into the water.

Drowning is the leading cause of injury or death for children ages 1 to 4. Every day, 10 people die from drowning, and two of those 10 are children under age 15. For those who survive, more than half are hospitalized or receive advanced care for serious injuries. 

Keep swimmers safe in the water by:

  • Making sure everyone knows how to swim.
  • Using life jackets appropriately.
  • Supervising swimmers.
  • Knowing CPR.

While pool chemicals kill germs and disinfect, they should be handled and stored properly. The CDC reports that preventable injuries from pool chemicals led to nearly 5,000 emergency room visits in 2012. Nearly 2,500 were in children and teenagers, and more than a third occurred at a home rather than a community pool.

Pool owners should always: 

  • Read and follow directions on product labels.
  • Wear safety equipment such as goggles or masks, as directed, when handling pool chemicals.
  • Secure pool chemicals to protect people and animals, and keep young children away when handling chemicals.
  • Never mix different pool chemicals with each other, especially chlorine products with acid.

Have a great, safe summer!

Apr 152014
 

As a Pirate alumna, Dasha Little not only honors East Carolina University’s motto “servire”, or “to serve” by representing her alma mater well through her company’s dedication to providing services to injured service members and other government contracts, but also by her faithful contributions towards several different programs within the University.

Through her donations towards areas such as Academic Affairs, the Colleges of Allied Health Sciences, Business, Fine Arts and Communications, and Health and Human Performance, and Student Life, she has continued to give back to the University. ECU is honored to have Dasha serve as one of the Incredible Women of ECU and a member of the ECU Distinguished Military Service Society. She also joined the ECU Medical and Health Sciences Foundation Board in February and spoke at the ECU Women’s Roundtable event in October, delivering her perspective on leadership and service.

Dasha, who majored in art education, graduated from ECU, along with her husband Kirk in 1981 and 1982, and founded Apogee Solutions, Inc. in 2002. During her years at ECU, she was involved in including the Student Government Association, Gamma Sigma Sigma service sorority, and ECU Ambassadors, and also served as a resident advisor. Following graduation Dasha decided to continue her education in a different area.

“I wanted to lean forward and use my creativity to venture into the counseling and Student services career field,” said Dasha, “I received my Master of Science degree in Counseling as a wife of an Air Force Officer. At that time I knew that having a portable degree and skills would make me employable in many duty sites and in many work situations. My love of people and serving led me to the Vocational Rehabilitation career field.”

When asked about her favorite memories from her time as an ECU student, Dasha is quick to say that meeting and marrying her “ECU sweetheart” Kirk is at the top of the list along with the amazing faculty with which she had the opportunity to interact.

Dasha Little with husband Kirk, photo by Jay Clark

Dasha Little with husband Kirk, photo by Jay Clark

“I am very thankful for the excellent instructors and administrator at ECU who saw promise and leadership qualities within me and called those capabilities forward to be my passion and vocational direction,” said Dasha.

Dasha now serves as the president and CEO of the company with Kirk as the vice president and chief operation officer. Apogee Solutions is a small business based in Virginia with over 160 employees in 13 states and the District of Columbia and provides allied health management, technology integration, and operations, training, and logistics consulting services to the U.S. government.

In its allied health management division, Apogee provides certified case management professionals who assist injured service members through counseling and job assistance. The division also helps assess patients’ potential benefit from rehabilitation services, vocational testing, vocational case management, and vocational earnings capacity assessments. Through their services, Apogee Solutions supports both the U.S. Government and private sector organizations in areas such as training and exercise support, medical training and education, and technology integration.

Through the other areas of Apogee, operations, training and logistics and technology integration, the company develops engineering designs and cyber operations along with modifying traditional, large-scale simulation systems to include weapons of mass destructions for marine training prior to deployment.

The Little family and their company make their focus and mission to “positively impact the delivery of professional services; exceed our customers’ expectations; provide qualified employees who deliver prompt achievement of customer requirements; and be priced at competitive rates.”

Despite their residency in Virginia, Dasha says that ECU has become a “destination and a lifestyle of living” that aids her and Kirk’s business.

“It has helped Kirk and I learn to focus on the fact that people are important, relationships are to be valued, and leadership and influence are to be shared. We are grateful to be proud Pirates and sing ECU’s praises often,” she says.

The Little’s four children followed in the footsteps of their Pirate parents, Forrest Little graduated East Carolina University in 2009 followed by sister Meredith in 2012 and both Robert and Raleigh Little are current students.