Mar 262014
 

The East Carolina University College of Nursing inducted nine members to its Hall of Fame during a ceremony held March 7 at Rock Springs Center in Greenville. The event, which also recognized the 2014 Distinguished Alumna, honored outstanding contributors to nursing in the areas of education, administration, research and practice.

The Hall of Fame has raised nearly $80,000 for a merit-based student scholarship fund since its inception in 2011. Thanks to the program, the college will award its fourth Hall of Fame Scholarship this fall. This year’s recipient, senior nursing student Katherine Waters, was recognized at the event.

“The Hall of Fame is a way to acknowledge the accomplishments of exemplary leaders in the field of nursing,” said Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the College of Nursing. “It’s fitting that we honor them by supporting the education of some of our brightest students.”

The 2014 inductees join a list of more than 60 Hall of Fame members representing eight states. Each new member receives a flame-shaped award that resembles the lamp illustrated on the college’s nursing pin. The lamp and its associated flame symbolize service and a vibrant life.

This year’s Hall of Fame class is Barbara Adams, Michelle Brooks, Dr. Robin Webb Corbett, Dr. Cheryl Duke, Carol Hallisey, Dr. Marie Pokorny, Helene Reilly, Linda Siegrist and Joanne Suggs.

On a night set aside for celebrating influential nurse leaders, the college also recognized the recipient of its 2014 Distinguished Alumni Award: Dr. Debra Wallace. Wallace is a Hall of Fame member from the class of 2011 and an alumnus of the college’s master of science in nursing program. Wallace is the Daphine Doster Mastroianni Distinguished Professor and associate dean for research at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro School of Nursing. She also is director of the UNC Greensboro Center for the Health of Vulnerable Populations.

HOF_2014_web

Pictured left to right: Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the College of Nursing, Linda Siegrist, Barbara Pendergrass (attended in honor of her aunt, inductee Barbara Adams), Dr. Marie Pokorny, Anne Suggs (represented her mother, inductee Joanne Suggs), Michelle Brooks, Dr. Robin Webb-Corbett, Dr. Cheryl Duke, Helene Reilly and Debra Wallace.

If you are interested in nominating a Hall of Fame member, contact Mark Alexander, major gifts officer, at alexanderma@ecu.edu or 252-744-2324. You can also learn more about the Hall of Fame at http://www.nursing.ecu.edu/hof_guidelines.htm

 

Share/Bookmark
Mar 252014
 

If you are anything like me, the rigors of an education in any realm of health care can at times exhaust the core, humanistic ideals that originally attracted us to choose a career that serves others. The idea that your work is solely to improve the lives of others is clouded by the demands to get higher grades, impress the folks around you, or satisfy the checkpoints that allow progression and acceptance. In 2007, Dr. Laurie Green, a former Brody medical student, and a few peers dreamt an idea to transcend this phenomenon – through art.

type.cast, the student-run art and literary magazine of the ECU health sciences campus, is an annual publication that showcases the artistic and literary talents of students and faculty.  You may have seen the magazines on coffee tables throughout your school or noticed the display on the second floor of Laupus Library.  Formerly, type.cast was limited to the School of Medicine.  Recently, the magazine has grown and now includes works from all over the health sciences division.  

In addition to becoming more inclusive, type.cast has expanded to include an impressive judging panel for selected pieces. This year, the works were judged by 19 esteemed faculty members who have acknowledged the importance of art in the field of medicine. The magazine itself has grown to more than 40 pages of quality photos, original fine art, jewelry, and literary works of students and faculty from the ECU health sciences campus. To celebrate the progress, type.cast and Laupus Library have teamed to host an official launch party of the publication at 4:30 p.m. Monday, March 31.. The fourth floor of Laupus will buzz with artistic expression, accompanied by wine and cheese, as the seventh edition will be revealed alongside a gallery of the art and literary pieces included in this year’s publication. Everyone is invited to drop by.

 The volume and degree of academic talent in the ECU health science campus impresses many. Invariably, students and faculty possess other talents that deserve to be showcased. I believe type.cast serves this role well while also uniting what can sometimes be a disjointed campus. This year’s edition reveals the common threads of human existence. Through its four chapters of “Flow,” “Grow,” “Breathe,” and “Create,” Edition VII explores the ubiquitous necessity of water for life, the miracle of growth, the rhythm of each breath taken by humans, and the amazing innovations of man.  

Endeavors such as type.cast allow a university campus to unite and celebrate our similarities and diversities. As we are all focused on improving the quality of life of our fellow man, it is my hope that Edition VII of type.cast instills a glimpse of inspiration in each member of the health sciences community. Hippocrates probably said it best:  “Wherever the art of medicine is loved, there is also a love of humanity.”  

Dylan Suttle, MS3, The Brody School of Medicine
Editor-in-Chief, type.cast Edition VII

Want to find out more about type.cast?  Follow us on twitter at @typecastBSOM or email us at brody.type.cast@gmail.com.

Want to submit your work for next year’s edition?  Keep an eye out for flyers and information this fall.

The type.cast Edition VII Launch Party will be held on Monday, March 31 from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of Laupus Library.

 dylan suttle photo

Mar 172014
 
LampSpr2014

Students take the nursing pledge during the annual ceremony.

The East Carolina University College of Nursing introduced first-year nursing students to the profession at its spring Lamp of Learning ceremony on March 6.

Each student received a pin that symbolizes their commitment to nursing to wear throughout their undergraduate career. The ceremony derives its name from the pins, which are shaped like a lamp of learning and meant to remind students that they are lifelong learners who take responsibility for themselves and their patients.

The lamp also is one of the primary icons illustrated on the ECU nursing pin, which each student receives upon graduation. Dean Sylvia Brown described the meaning behind ECU’s nursing pin. Created by the college’s first graduating class in 1964, she said the shield-shaped pin represents the values the college holds dear: love, compassion, understanding and knowledge.

“I hope that all of you will think of those characteristics as you’re studying in our program and once you go out into practice,” Brown told the students, “and that you’ll be proud to be an ECU pirate nurse.”

The Lamp of Learning ceremony included a welcome from nursing faculty members and the president-elect of the Beta Nu chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the international honor society of nursing. Attendees also learned about the college’s Student Emergency Needs Fund. The fund is made possible through a monetary gift that Brown makes in the name of each first-year student and is meant to support students facing unexpected emergency expenses. Students then took the nursing pledge and gathered with faculty to enjoy cupcakes.

“It felt like kind of an initiation to nursing school,” Rebecca Moye, a first-year student from Goldsboro, said about the event. “It’s reassuring to hear them say how big a deal it is and what an honor it is to be in nursing school, especially at ECU.”

Mar 142014
 

This coming week is Match Week – the highly anticipated event of the residency application process for all senior medical students. Many people have heard of Match Day, but may not realize the carefully orchestrated and, at times, chaotic events in the week leading up to the day.

Monday, March 17 – At 12pm EST, Fourth-year students receive emails from the National Resident Matching Program letting them know if they matched.  For most students who receive the coveted “Congratulations, you have matched” email from NRMP, there’s nothing to do but wait until the ceremony when students will receive the actual location of the program they match to. However, for those students -who find out they did not match – there is much to do before Friday.

These students will enter SOAP (Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program) formally known as SCRAMBLE. Students will receive a list of unfilled programs and can begin “applying.” The process is stressful since students have usually never visited the program or city that they will be considering. Moreover, the programs listed may not be in the specialty to which the student originally applied. 

Tuesday, March 18 – Unfilled programs begin ranking the unmatched applicants. Programs can start officially entering a list that ranks the unmatched applicants who have applied to them.  Programs can continue to contact unmatched applicants who have applied to their program via SOAP.

Wednesday and Thursday, March 19-20 – Unfilled programs submit rank list and SOAP offers are made.  Candidates will be notified which programs have “offered” them a spot.  Offers will be extended in rounds. Students will have three hours per round to make a decision.

Friday – March 21 – 12:00pm EST –Match Day ceremonies commence around the United States. This will mark the 32nd Match Day ceremony at Brody. Friends, family, staff, and faculty fill the Brody Auditorium anxiously waiting for their student’s name to be called at random and each student then proceeds to the stage to receive an envelope containing the name of the residency program to which they are matched. By tradition, monetary contributions are collected from those in attendance and the student whose name is called last receives that prize.

Kelly D. Lancaster
Director of Student Services & Financial Aid
Brody School of Medicine
Office of Student Affairs

Kelly Lancaster

Mar 112014
 

When disasters strike, such as fires, tornadoes or more commonly for eastern North Carolinians, hurricanes, the American Red Cross does its part in aiding those affected by the incident. Now, one faculty member and four students from the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies in the College of Allied Health Sciences have recently been trained to provide counseling along with the American Red Cross through the “Ready When the Time Comes” program.

“Ready When the Times Comes” is a corporate volunteer program and is “designed to tap into corporate America’s expertise and desire to help people in need” according to the American Red Cross website. Through this program, Red Cross is able to prepare employees from partnering corporations to be mobilized and respond when a disaster occurs.

Navigate Counseling at ECU Team

(L-R) Members of the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies, Vanessa Perry, Celeste Crawford, Dr. Leigh Atherton, Samantha Coleman and Jeff Thomas are proud to serve as part of the American Red Cross “Ready When the Times Comes” program. (not pictured: Matt Cox)

Team leader Dr. Leigh Atherton, a clinical assistant professor and director of the Navigate Counseling Clinic, will lead four students from the department Samantha Coleman, Matt Cox, Vanessa Perry and Jeff Thomas in this endeavor. The group will not only use their skills and expertise required to provide counseling and aid through the Navigate Counseling Clinic, but also skills they learned through several required Red Cross trainings on topics such as mental health fundamentals, psychological first aid and providing emergency assistance. Now that they’ve completed the extensive training the Navigate Counseling Team at East Carolina University is ready to be dispatched if needed during a local disaster.

“Giving back to the community is a core value of Navigate Counseling Clinic, and the ‘Ready When the Time Comes’ volunteer opportunity is a perfect match for our team. We are all excited for the opportunity to provide assistance to those affected by disasters on both a local and national level,” said Atherton.

Another member of the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Services, Celeste Crawford has been a Red Cross RWTC volunteer for many years and while she isn’t part of the Navigate Counseling Clinic at ECU team, she has been on a number of national deployments. Most recently, she was part of a team of North Carolina-based volunteers who responded to the shooting on the Washington Navy Yard.

The Navigate Counseling Team at ECU is proud to honor the University’s motto “Servire” by serving those in need through the “Ready When the Times Comes” program with the American Red Cross. To learn more about how you can get involved with this program, visit the American Red Cross website at www.redcross.org .