Mar 032015
 
Left to right, ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard, Dr. Wiley Nifong, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Rick Niswander, and Governor Pat McCrory

Left to right, ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard, Dr. Wiley Nifong, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Rick Niswander, and Governor Pat McCrory

Gov. Pat McCrory announced during his March 2 visit to the East Carolina Heart Institute at East Carolina University that his budget will allocate $16 million over the next two years to stabilize the financial challenges at the Brody School of Medicine.

“With those funds, my goal is for all of us to use the next two years to develop a long-term plan for a sustainable economic model that will allow the school to continue producing the doctors North Carolina needs for generations to come,” said McCrory.

Following a private meeting with ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Rick Niswander and Brody administrators, the governor toured the heart center’s Robotics Lab and tried his hand at a robotic surgery simulation.

Also in attendance were Dr. Aldona Wos, secretary for the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services, N.C. Sen. Louis Pate and N.C. Rep. Brian Brown.

N.C. Gov. Pat McCrory, left, and Dr. Wiley Nifong examine an interactive display illustrating that ECU has trained surgeons from 33 states in the use of the robotic da Vinci Surgical System.

At a press conference following the tour the governor said, “The Brody School has continued to deliver on the mission our state legislature set forth for it. Now we need to find a way to build upon those successes and expand them.

“I don’t see ECU as being only for eastern North Carolina. I see it as being for all of North Carolina,” he added.

Wos said, “It’s critical that we continue to fulfill the promise of 1974 – to provide access to care for the citizens of this region. The only way to do that is to have a viable medical community here that’s training the next generation of providers. The majority of physicians who train here, stay here. And I want to thank Brody for that.”

Ballard told McCrory, “I assure you that ECU will do our part. We’ll continue to spruce up the long-term plan we’ve been working on. It focuses on increasing efficiencies and continuing the excellent relationship we have with Vidant Medical Center, who is instrumental to our long-term plan.

“This funding means a flagship program of ours will be sustained,” he said, “and we’ll be able to continue impacting health care and economic development in the east.”

The governor’s recommended budget will soon be delivered to the legislature for consideration.

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Mar 022015
 

Excel22East Carolina University freshmen and transfer students who are either majoring in an area within the College of Allied Health Sciences or interested in pursuing a degree from the College and earned a 3.0 GPA or higher during the fall semester were recognized for their academic achievements on Feb. 20 as part of the annual ECU EXCELS program.

Following a brief presentation by Interim Dean Greg Hassler, senior students and faculty members from the four undergraduate programs at CAHS, Clinical Laboratory Science, Health Services Management, Speech and Hearing Science, and Rehabilitation Services spoke about their programs and gave the students advice about how to make the most out of their majors and to continue succeeding in their college careers.

After hearing from the seniors, advisors Anthony Coutouzis and Kristal Gauthier presented the awarded students with an ECU Excels certificate, along with Dr. Hassler.

The following students were invited to be recognized as part of the ECU Excels Program:

Adams, Kathryn A.

Adams, Melissa D.

Alford, Carter L.

Almutairi, Rashed A.

Ayscue, Ashley K.

Baggett, Anna M.

Bates, Lindsey H.

Best, Morgan B.

Bogert, Hunter S.

Bridgers, Maci A.

Brinkley, Mariana E.

Bullard, Madison A.

Burgin, Stephanie

Butler, Jennifer B.

Cantrell, Casey F.

Clarke, Kimberly M.

Cline, Anna E.

Cooper, Alicia J.

Coro, Jeisy C.

Cox, Ashlyn B.

Currier, Madison M.

Daborowski, Jared D.

Dahrooge, Victoria M.

D’Artois, Kelsey A.

Davis, Kensleigh G.

DeGree, Meagan N.

DeRoche, Carina A.

Donaldson, Christina M.

Driver, Carrie L.

Echols, Aliyah D.

Evans, Brittany G.

Flaster, Traci M.

Fleming, Dusty L.

Furimsky, Stephanie A.

Gagliardi, Elizabeth R.

Garner, Elizabeth L.

Gibson, Wendy R.

Glenn, Corey S.

Goodman, Angela K.

Gregory, Candace C.

Hamiel, Kionna R.

Hancock, Paige E.

Hart, Dawn A.

Hauhuth, Kelly E.

Hernandez, Alicia N.

Herold, Amy C.

Hill, Matthew G.

Hoffman, Maria Christina K.

Holcomb, Michael J.

Houston, Kayla E.

Hughes, Anna J.

Jama, Hodan A.

James, Louisa D.

Jarman, Haleigh P.

Johnson, Chynah A.

Kea, Angela F.

Kline, Kylie P.

Koogler, Mary R.

Lancaster, Brittany D.

Lanier, Deanna T.

Le, TuAnh N.

Lee, Aspyn P.

Lee, Patricia L.

Luyster, Sydney R.

Marriaga Castillo, Abner E.

Marsh, Connie L.

Medina, Alexis M.

Miller, Jamie L.

Miller, Melissa L.

Mills, Kristina K.

Miranda, Shawn H.

Moore, Jessica M.

Murray, Harley K.

Nelson, Lani D.

Newnam, Andrew P.

Nguyen, Kristina Y.

Niccoli, Jennifer B.

Nicks, Charlotte E.

Palmiotto, Jessica L.

Paynter, Janis D.

Pemberton, Colleen A.

Phthisic, Rachel D.

Poole, Janice G.

Pozegic, Lejla

Price, Donna

Quick, Brandon F.

Ringenberg, Rachel N.

Robbins, Whitney A.

Robinson, Julie A.

Rodriguez, Angela N.

Sampson, Deion T.

Scales, Autumn K.

Schulman, Emily B.

Scribner, Haley

Skinner, Julia M.

Smith, Harley G.

Smith, Shadona R.

Stanley, Erica N.

Starling, Allison K.

Stevens, Erika

Stokes, Joel E.

Stone, Savanna J.

Strickland, Lydia G.

Taylor, Aubrie W.

Taylor, Garrett F.

Teeter, Meredith E.

Terrell, Teresa M.

Tisdale, Ashlynn S.

Valdez, Tatiana V.

Vue, Susan

Wallace, Shamika L.

Warren, Eddie E.

Waterman, Maryelizabeth

Williams, Vantisha B.

Wilson, Sierra K.

Ziegler, Melissa L.
The students then had the chance to tour the College and learn more about their intended or current majors.

This is the sixth year that the ECU Excels program has recognized the accomplishments of first time ECU students. For more information contact Anthony Coutouzis at coutousiza@ecu.edu.

Feb 192015
 
Tap water images

This winter marks the 70th anniversary of community water fluoridation in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) heralded it, “one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th Century” (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013).

The term “community water fluoridation” means fluoride levels are adjusted in an area’s public water supply to help prevent tooth decay and improve oral health. “Water fluoridation reduces tooth decay by about 25% over a person’s lifetime,” (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013).

In 1945, Grand Rapids, Michigan, was the first city in the world to receive additional fluoride in their public water supply (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013). Before this occurred, extensive research was done. Dr. H. Trendley Dean, head of the Dental Hygiene Unit at the National Institutes of Health, was among the first to study fluoride with the help of his research team. After developing a new method of measuring fluoride levels, the team began testing water across the country (Statement on Water Fluoridation, 2004). It was found that fluoride measures up to 1 part per million in drinking water did not cause enamel fluorosis, or brown spots occurring on teeth (Statement on Water Fluoridation, 2004). Then the Michigan Department of Health voted to add fluoride to their drinking water (Statement on Water Fluoridation, 2004).

Today, over 204 million people, 74%, in the United States consume water supplies containing enough fluoride to enhance oral health (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013). In North Carolina, about 87% of people have access to fluoridated water supplies (Community Water Fluoridation, 2013). Charlotte was the first city in the state to fluoridate its water in 1949 (Gerald, 2012). The NC Department of Health and Human Services says dental decay rates in children living in North Carolina were reduced by about 60% after the introduction of fluoridated water in the state.

Several years after the first water fluoridation treatments began in North Carolina; Pitt County started adding fluoride to the area’s water. According to Julius Patrick, Greenville Utility Commission’s Water Treatment Plant Superintendent, Greenville began adding fluoride to water supplies in 1957. He also says Greenville’s water comes from the Tar River which naturally contains .1 mg/l of fluoride. Patrick oversees the team as they filter this water and then add fluoride. In addition, Patrick says the water plant conducts a daily analysis measuring substances in water in parts per billion. This fluoridated water reaches many in the Pitt County area. For example, when the CDC collected data via a fluoridation census in 1992, it was found that over 47,000 Greenville residents were provided with fluoridated water.

Due to the research of the inquisitive Dr. Dean over 70 years ago, the United States will continue to boast more favorable oral hygiene thanks to the discovery of community water fluoridation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feb 102015
 

When East CarolinREACH QI Symp Jan 2015a University’s Brody School of Medicine was awarded a $1 million grant by the American Medical Association in 2013 to help shape how future doctors are trained, AMA leaders cited the school’s reputation for bold innovation.

That spirit of innovation was the guest of honor at a symposium held January 21 at the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU. The Quality Improvement Symposium showcased 25 quality improvement projects by faculty members across the health sciences. All are inaugural fellows in Brody’s Teachers of Quality Academy (TQA) who spent the past year pioneering ways to better meet the demands of a changing health care delivery system.

Brody established the academy shortly after being named one of only 11 medical schools to receive the five-year REACH (Redesigning Education to Accelerate Change in Healthcare) grant. The TQA is an eighteen-month faculty development program designed to prepare faculty to teach new curriculum in patient safety, quality improvement and population health in an environment of inter-professional, team-based care.

The symposium’s best oral presentation award went to Dr. Niti Armistead in the Department of Internal Medicine, for her work entitled, “Hypoglycemia and Harm Reduction through Education and Increased Use of Order Sets.” Honorable mentions for oral presentations were awarded to Dr. Jason Foltz, Department of Family Medicine, for his presentation, “Reduction in Primary Care No Show Rates,” and Dr. Megan Sippey, Department of Surgery, for her presentation, “Resident Education: Improving Surgical History and Physical Documentation.”

The best poster award went to Dr. Bryan Kitch, Department of Emergency Medicine, for his project, “Identification and Recognition of Boarding Psychiatric Patients Can Lead to Improved Medication Reconciliation.” Dr. Harry Adams, formerly in the Department of Internal Medicine and now with the Office of Medical Education, received honorable mention for his poster, “Integration of Pathology and Pharmacology Learning Issues into the Clinically Based Seminars in the M2 Introduction to Medicine Course.”

The academy has produced 20 new curricular components and student experiences that are already being infused into medical, allied health and nursing education across ECU.

To learn more about the REACH Initiative, visit www.ecu.edu/reach/.

 

 

Feb 032015
 
DSC_3983

Participants in the 2014 Pirate Nurse 5K braved the rain.

Get your running shoes ready! The 2015 Pirate Nurse 5K will take place on Saturday, March 28. All proceeds for this event, organized by the East Carolina University College of Nursing, benefit nursing students through the ECU Nursing Senior Class Scholarship Fund and the Linda Pynn Nurse Practitioner Scholarship Fund. Runners and walkers are welcome to enjoy the course, which traverses the ECU Health Sciences Campus. 

Registration
Visit www.runtheeast.com or click here to register.

Location
East Carolina University College of Nursing
600 Moye Blvd
Greenville, NC 27834

Start Times
7:30 a.m. Packet pick-up and day-of registration opens
8:45 a.m. Kids’ race start
9 a.m. 5K start

Registration Fees
Individual Registration: $25
ECU Student Registration: $15 (discount taken during online registration process)
Kids’ Fun Run (ages 3-8): Free but registration is required

Register by March 6 to guarantee you receive a race t-shirt. You must be present the day of the race to get your shirt. There will be two male and two female award winners in each age group.

Questions? Contact willye14@ecu.edu or call 252-744-6424.