Jan 062015
 

MyChart-phoneAll ECU Physicians clinics are now offering patients access to their own electronic health records through a secure online patient portal called MyChart.

Once enrolled, patients can use any computer, tablet or smartphone with Internet access to securely view their test results or appointment notes, send non-urgent messages to their health care providers, request medication refills or appointments and review their active problem or medication list.

“MyChart allows patients to stay connected to their providers and to get better control of their own health,” said Dr. Tommy Ellis, chief medical information officer for ECU Physicians. “It’s a safe, easy, convenient way for patients and their families to keep tabs on all aspects of their health care. Everything’s all in one place, up-to-date and at their fingertips all the time, no matter where they are.”

Ellis said MyChart’s rollout is already contributing to better health outcomes for ECU Physicians patients, because patients who are actively involved in their own health care are more likely to comply with their doctors’ recommendations.

“When a patient can easily communicate personal health information and questions to their provider, it also helps the health care team diagnose them more accurately and develop the best care plan possible for that patient,” he said.

Ellis noted that the patient portal can also help patients avoid unnecessary or duplicate tests, procedures or immunizations when patients seek care from multiple providers.

A proxy option enables family members to monitor health information for their children or aging parents.

Dr. John Stockstill, a professor in ECU’s School of Dental Medicine, said MyChart “takes the guesswork out of being a patient.

“It keeps the uncertainties from piling up,” he said. “I can log into my medical record anytime and review what my doctor has said regarding me, how I should be taking my medications, what my medicines are supposed to be doing, when my appointments are, what my lab results are, what procedures or tests my doctor has recommended for me to stay healthy.”

Stockstill said he especially values the quick response he gets from his medical providers when he submits requests or questions through MyChart – typically less than 48 hours.

“MyChart is very patient-friendly,” he said, “but it’s not generic. It’s very personal and individual.”

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Dec 302014
 

Pin Print-2Donors who make a pledge of $200 or more to the East Carolina University College of Nursing’s fund drive this academic year are receiving a special thank you gift in return: a print of a painting representing the college pin.

The pin, designed by the college’s first graduating class, symbolizes the values the institution holds dear. The 11” x 14” print is of an ECU purple and gold canvas painting by Greenville artist Dodi Groesser.

Gifts to the College of Nursing annual fund support student scholarships.

How to Give

Click here to give online now (choose “Alumni” or “Other” by “Giving Reason”). You can also make a check to ECU College of Nursing and send it to the address below. If you have questions, contact us at 252-744-6424 or willye14@ecu.edu.

ECU College of Nursing
4165N Health Sciences Building
Greenville, NC 27858

Dec 232014
 
Megan Inman

Megan Inman

Megan Inman, librarian liaison for Laupus Library the is co-editor of the newly published book, Curriculum-Based Library Instruction: From Cultivating Faculty Relationships to Assessment. The book highlights the movement of instruction beyond one-shot sessions, specifically focusing on situations where academic librarians have developed curriculum based sessions and/or become involved in curriculum committees.

This volume describes and provides examples of librarians’ varied roles in the curriculum of education programs. These roles include semester long or multi-session instructor, web-based course designer, problem-based learning facilitator, and member of a curriculum committee.

In addition to describing the roles that librarians have in supporting curriculum, the book describes how to carry out those roles with sections devoted to adult learning theory, teaching methods, developing learning objectives, and working with faculty to develop curriculum. Examples of library sessions devoted to information literacy, evidence based practice, information literacy, and biomedical informatics are included.

 

Dec 162014
 

flu4583-1Recent news about the emergence of a mutated flu virus should serve as a wakeup call to those who haven’t gotten a flu vaccination this year, according to Dr. Paul Cook, infectious diseases specialist at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. And despite speculation that the current vaccine may not protect against this new virus, he says those who have gotten vaccinated already shouldn’t worry that it was for naught.

The Centers for Disease Control recently reported that over half of the H3N2, or Influenza A, virus samples they’ve tested thus far this season were found to be antigenetically different – or “drifted” – from the virus used in this year’s vaccine. Because this H3 virus seems to be dominating the current flu scene, the CDC is predicting a heavier flu season, with more hospitalizations and deaths than in past years.

“This happens all the time with influenza viruses; it’s nothing new,” says Cook. “The mutated virus was recognized back in the spring, but by then this year’s vaccine had already been developed and was being manufactured. Next year’s vaccine will take the mutated H3N2 into effect.”

But even with the prospect of lower protection rates, Cook says vaccination is still the best protection against the flu, and especially important for those at high risk for serious complications from it, like pregnant women, the elderly and people whose immune systems are compromised due to HIV or cancer.

“The current vaccine still covers H1N1 effectively, as well as influenza B, and those viruses are still out there,” he said. “We think it may even be providing some immunity against the mutated virus. Besides, the vaccine itself is pretty innocuous.”

Cook urges people to visit the doctor early if they begin experiencing symptoms like fever, sore throat, cough or body aches. And he echoes the CDC’s recommendation for primary care providers to be vigilant about prescribing antiviral medications like Tamiflu and Relenza as soon as flu is suspected. These medications can lessen the duration and severity of the illness when started within 48 hours of symptom onset.

Dec 052014
 

Anne DickersonAs 10,000 baby boomers per day enter the over-65 age bracket, the concern for older drivers’ safety and independence is greater now than ever. Adults 65 and older make up more than 16 percent of all licensed drivers nationwide, and it’s estimated that 1 in 5 Americans will be 70 or older by 2040.

The American Occupational Therapy Association works with several other organizations to raise awareness about the safety of older drivers through their Older Driver Safety Awareness Week, held annually during the first week of December.

In conjunction with this week, the association has created a series of educational podcasts that focus on empowering older drivers and their families. Dr. Anne Dickerson, professor in ECU’s Department of Occupational Therapy, was interviewed for one of the podcasts, which deals with driving fitness evaluations – ranging from self-assessments to comprehensive driving evaluations from an occupational therapy driving rehabilitation specialist.

“Most older adults are safe to drive,” Dickerson said. “But this is all about promoting conversations.” Dickerson added that ECU is exploring ways of providing services that would facilitate older people going back to driving after recovering from heart attacks or strokes, for example.

“Just as we plan for our financial futures, we need to plan for our transportation futures as we age,” says Elin Schold Davis, project coordinator of AOTA’s Older Driver Safety Initiative. “Respecting the physical, cognitive, and sensory changes that come with age may require adjustments in driving patterns, vehicle equipment, or a skills refresher, but do not have to mean giving up the keys and living in isolation without access to transportation.”

The podcasts can be found at http://www.aota.org/Conference-Events/Older-Driver-Safety-Awareness-Week.aspx.