Sep 092014
 
Representatives from the Greater Carolinas Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society visited Greenville to formally present ECU Physicians Neurology with recognition as a partner in MS care. Pictured during that event are, left to right, are Robert Frere, Londra Fleming, Shawnna Patterson, Donald L. Price Jr., Lovie Powers and Kaye Gooch.

Representatives from the Greater Carolinas Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society visited Greenville to formally present ECU Physicians Neurology with recognition as a partner in MS care. Pictured during that event are, left to right, are Robert Frere, Londra Fleming, Shawnna Patterson, Donald L. Price Jr., Lovie Powers and Kaye Gooch.

 

ECU Physicians Neurology, a leading provider of care for people living with multiple sclerosis in eastern North Carolina, has been recognized as an official “Partner in MS Care” by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

This formal designation honors the practice’s commitment to providing exceptional MS care, and to working closely with the society to address the challenges of people affected by the disease.

“We are so proud to partner with ECU Physicians Neurology to enhance coordinated care for the more than 800 people who live with MS in Pitt County and its surrounding areas,” said Kaye Gooch, executive vice president of programs and services for the Greater Carolinas Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“In earning this recognition, ECU Physicians Neurology has demonstrated extraordinary leadership in MS care, making a tremendous impact on people affected by MS in their community and region,” she said.

Joseph Hodges, clinical administrative manager for the practice, said, “This designation is an important achievement for us because it endorses the level of care and professional commitment our physicians and staff provide our patients living with multiple sclerosis. It means we work in cooperation with the MS Society and with many local providers and hospitals to ensure patients receive the highest level of quality care available.

“Although multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease, it impacts many body functions,” he added. “Thus, coordination with other physicians and caregivers is essential for patients to achieve a high level of functionality in their daily lives.”

MS is a chronic, unpredictable disease of the central nervous system in which the body’s immune system incorrectly attacks healthy tissue in the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves, disrupting the flow of information between the brain, spinal cord and other parts of the body.

Symptoms can range from relatively benign to disabling and include blurred vision, loss of balance, poor coordination, slurred speech, tremors, numbness, extreme fatigue, memory and concentration problems, paralysis and blindness. It’s estimated that more than 2.3 million people worldwide are affected by MS.

ECU Physicians Neurology is the largest and most comprehensive neurological medical practice in eastern North Carolina, with 10 physicians who care for patients with MS. One of them, Dr. Robert Frere, who is board-certified in neurology and psychiatry, holds a specialty certification in neurophysiology.

The practice provides MS diagnosis, neuropsychological or cognitive evaluation and treatment, ongoing MS medical and symptom management, pain management, and patient and family education. They also participate in MS clinical trials and research.

ECU Physicians Neurology is located at 2280 Hemby Lane in Greenville. For an appointment, call 252-752-4848, or toll-free 1-800-775-4840. For more information about the practice visit www.ecu.edu/ecuphysicians.

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Sep 022014
 

The Academy of Community Engagement Scholarship (ACES) board of directors has invited Dr. Beth Velde, director of strategic planning & the Mills Symposium for the College of Allied Health Sciences, to become an inaugural member of the Academy.

Dr. Beth Velde

Dr. Velde was nominated and selected by peers because of her practice and model of excellence in collaboration with communities and the university while addressing critical issues of mutual benefit. She will be inducted to the Academy Oct. 7 at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium.

The mission of the Academy of Engaged Scholarship (ACES) is to assist in improving the physical, social, civic and economic well-being of communities by advancing scholarship based on collaborative discovery by communities and their higher education partners. To do so, ACES selects persons in communities and higher education institutions who have been recognized by their peers as exceptional in their accomplishments in engagement to serve as members. These members then draw on that expertise to further the application of engagement for addressing the challenges and opportunities of community and higher education partners.  Members selected will also have the opportunity to serve the greater good by advancing community engagement scholarship and advancing community-engaged disciplinary and transdisciplinary scholarly activities and knowledge to address regional, national, and global issues. 

ACES explores critical and complex societal and community issues and provides recommendations, upon request, to inform local, regional, national, and international research and policy agendas using input and valuable data gathered through the involvement of leading community engagement scholars, community engagement partners, and knowledgeable community counterparts.

At the forefront of ACES’ mission is the need to ensure that all scholarly activities and policy initiatives keep in mind the needs of the constituents involved. Through their transparency, willingness to involve all groups in their practices, and encouragement of shared authority, ACES serves as a representative voice of allied groups in the field of engagement.

Beth Velde, PhD is a professor emerita within the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University and chair of the APLU’s Council on Engagement and Outreach. She directs the ECU Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy which prepares ECU faculty,  graduate students and ECU scholars to partner with communities and conduct research that is important and relevant to the communities. Her research includes the culture of engagement at ECU, the perceptions of community partners regarding the roles and responsibilities of telling the story of community engagement, and the synergies between leadership and public service. She leads the ECU team for the Carnegie engaged university designation and chaired the working groups responsible for the SACS narratives on public service and community engagement.

Learn more about the Academy of Engagement Scholarship at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium website here.

Aug 292014
 

Dr. Patricia Crane has been named associate dean for research and creative activities, East Carolina University College of Nursing Dean Sylvia Brown said in an announcement to faculty and staff recently. Crane also serves as the Richard R. Eakin Distinguished Professor of Nursing.

Crane came to ECU from the University of North Carolina Greensboro, where she served as a professor of adult health nursing since 2001 and as the chair of the Department of Adult Health Nursing from 2009-2012. She is the immediate past president of the Southern Nursing Research Society.

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“Dr. Crane is a highly regarded scientist who brings an extensive background in research into this position,” Brown said. “We look forward to her leadership as we work to emphasize scholarly activity in the college.”

Crane’s research interests focus on adult health care issues, including topics such as fatigue following heart attack, biological markers associated with recovery after a heart attack, and depression. She has received awards such as the 2007 Nurse Researcher of the Year from the North Carolina Nurses Association and the Research Excellence Award from UNCG. She has received funding from the National Institute of Nursing Research and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities.

Crane assumes the position as Dr. Martha Engelke returns to a faculty position to continue her research and teaching roles. Engelke joined the College of Nursing faculty in 1979 and has served as associate dean for research and creative activities since 2001. She was the first Richard R. Eakin Distinguished Professor of Nursing and has held that distinction since 2009.

“Dr. Engelke not only has been the college’s ‘champion’ for research,” Brown said, “she has been a stellar role model as she pursued her own research agenda with great success and supported research endeavors across the college.”

Aug 262014
 
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Two ECU School of Dental Medicine faculty members, Dr. Ervin Davis and Dr. John Stockstill, and others have published a study, “Pain-related worry in patients with chronic orofacial pain,” in the July 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

The researchers explored the prevalence of trait, general, and pain-related worry and the association of worry with high pain levels and other variables. The study found substantial levels of worry among patients and pain-related worry related to higher levels of pain, pain interference, and pain duration. Patients who have pain-related worries may overestimate the seriousness of having pain and think of dire consequences, even feeling their lives will be devastated by pain.

Clinicians treating patients with orofacial pain should assess pain-related worry to understand the effects of their patient’s specific worries on pain and functioning. In addition, patients with substantial worry may be helped by learning techniques and skills to reduce unproductive worry and catastrophizing and improve skills to cope with chronic pain, such as learning distraction techniques, using positive self talk, and continuing activities and interests in spite of pain.

Authors: C. Ervin Davis, MS, PhD; John W. Stockstill, DDS, MS; William D. Stanley, DDS, MS; Qiang Wu, PhD

Dr. Davis is the Unit Chief of Behavioral Sciences and clinical assistant professor in the Department of General Dentistry at the ECU School of Dental Medicine, East Carolina University. Contact: daviscl@ecu.edu.

Dr. Stockstill is Division Director of Orthodontics and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics at the ECU School of Dental Medicine, East Carolina University. Contact: stockstillj@ecu.edu.

Audio Interview

To listen to an audio interview with Dr. Ervin Davis conducted by the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, click here.

Full Text

To read the full text of the publication, click here.

Aug 192014
 

Incoming ECU medical students named Brody Scholars are, left to right, Ismail Kassim of High Point, Alyssa D¹Addezio of Concord and Zachary Sutton of Pink Hill.Incoming ECU medical students named Brody Scholars are, left to right, Ismail Kassim of High Point, Alyssa D¹Addezio of Concord and Zachary Sutton of Pink Hill.

Three incoming students at East Carolina University’s Brody School of Medicine have been named Brody Scholars for the Class of 2018.

Alyssa D’Addezio of Concord, Ismail Kassim of High Point and Zachary Sutton of Pink Hill will receive four years of medical school tuition, living expenses and the opportunity to design their own summer enrichment program that can include travel abroad. The award will also support community service projects the students may undertake while in medical school.

D’Addezio attended North Carolina State University on a Park Scholarship, the university’s four-year merit scholarship program founded on scholarship, leadership, service and character. She graduated in May with a human biology degree and a minor in English.

She said one of her short-term goals is to serve in a local clinic for underserved populations in preparation for a primary care career in North Carolina. “The Brody Scholars program generously provides support that allows me to boldly pursue primary care without the burden or limitations of debt,” she said. “It also gives me an amazing opportunity to help meet the health care needs of the people of North Carolina by enhancing my medical education and training with networking and support.”

Kassim also graduated recently from N.C. State with degrees in human biology and chemistry. A native of Nigeria, he said he hasn’t decided on a specialty yet, but has enjoyed previous exposure to both family medicine and oncology.

Over the next four years, Kassim hopes to “gain the skills needed to become a competent and compassionate physician while cultivating healthy relationships that will last a lifetime. My selection as a Brody Scholar highlights the support of the family members, friends, mentors and educators who have invested in me and helped me develop into the person I am today,” he added. “I am eternally grateful to the Brody Scholars program for their belief in me and willingness to transform my dream of becoming a physician into reality.”

Sutton graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2013 with a degree in biochemistry. He said he doesn’t have a specific medical specialty in mind but is interested in exploring family medicine.

“I want to learn not only the knowledge associated with becoming a doctor, but also the social skills needed to effectively interact with patients and other medical staff,” Sutton said. “As a kid growing up in and around Kinston, I have long known about the Brody family [of Kinston and Greenville]…and their great contributions toward improving health care in eastern North Carolina. Becoming a part of their family as a Brody Scholar is truly an honor, and I will do everything I can to promote the Brody name in a positive manner.

James Peden Jr., associate dean for admissions at the medical school, said, “For over 30 years the Brody Medical Scholarship Program has attracted outstanding students to the Brody School of Medicine, providing them with opportunities and development activities in addition to very generous financial support. Our Brody Scholars have in turn enriched the Brody School of Medicine with their academic, leadership and altruistic contributions. Most importantly, Brody Scholars have gone on to fulfill the BSOM mission by practicing as outstanding physicians caring for the people of North Carolina.”

In its 32nd year, the Brody Scholars program honors J.S. “Sammy” Brody. He and his brother, Leo, were among the earliest supporters of medical education in eastern North Carolina. The legacy continues through the dedicated efforts of Hyman Brody of Greenville and David Brody of Kinston. Subsequent gifts from the Brody family have enabled the medical school to educate new physicians, conduct important research and improve health care in eastern North Carolina.

Since the program began in 1983, 128 students have received scholarships. About 70 percent of Brody Scholars remain in North Carolina to practice, and the majority of those stay in eastern North Carolina.