Feb 122013
 

Kids of all ages agree: candy is the best part about Valentine’s Day.

Believe it or not, even dentists eat candy and other sweet treats on occasion. In fact, we’d argue that the ability to enjoy candy hearts each February is one of the sweetest incentives to maintaining good oral health. Go ahead – tell your kids we said so!

While you’re at it, you might check out the fun, free resources available to you all month long, through the American Dental Association’s National Children’s Dental Health Month. Every February, ADA sponsors the month to raise national awareness around oral health best practices for youth – a message that ECU School of Dental Medicine faculty and students would like to deliver to North Carolina’s many underserved dental patients. So while National Children’s Dental Health Month gives us yet another reason to love February, you might say it’s an occasion we at ECU commemorate year-round.

We want to inform kids (and grown-ups!) about dental care best practices that allow them to both continue eating the foods they love, and safeguard against a variety of health problems. And ever since we opened our doors in the fall of 2011, improving access to patient care has been our goal.

The path to better oral health in North Carolina starts with our kids. When we teach our children to care for their teeth at an early age, they’ll reap the benefits for a lifetime. Today, that cavity-free kid who remembers to brush twice a day can still enjoy a few candy hearts.  And down the road, the grown-up version of the same child will remember that flossing is part of the overall regimen in preventing heart disease.

Read more about how the School of Dental Medicine’s service-based curriculum delivers dental care to North Carolina kids and grown-ups who need it most: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/dentistry/About-Us.cfm.

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Jan 102013
 

Your New Year’s resolutions may include lifestyle changes like weight control, exercise, and stress relief, but have you thought about resolving to improve your oral health?

Below are some resolutions to consider regarding oral health—not only for 2013 but for a lifetime. Over the next couple of months, we’ll discuss what the American Dental Association has to say about ways to improve your overall oral health. Consider these lifelong resolutions:

  1. Read about oral health and know the facts (not fiction)
  2. Brush and floss regularly
  3. Visit a dentist regularly
  4. Quit smoking
  5. Eat sweets in moderation

Regarding No.1, the American Dental Association has a “Mouth Healthy” website to answer questions on oral health throughout the life span, including pregnancy, babies and kids, preteens and teens, adults under 40, adults 40-60, and adults over 60. Check out the website here.

An example of what “Mouth Healthy” offers is a quiz on oral health care. Do you know if these statements are true or false? 

  • Aspirin placed next to a tooth is a good way to relieve a toothache.
  • A little bleeding of the gums after brushing or flossing is normal.
  • Sensitivity in teeth means you have decay.
  • Sugarless chewing gum can help keep teeth healthy.

Get the answers here.