Dec 022014
 

Paws for Study Break pic 1

As medical students near the end of the semester, the stress of finishing assignments and taking final exams mounts. Students welcome brief periods of relaxation during busy days of studying… and more studying. Students enjoyed spending time with Canopy the therapy dog during Paws for Study Breaks held on October 27 and November 13. Research indicates that interaction with therapy dogs can temporarily affect the release of various neurotransmitters in the brain; levels of oxytocin and dopamine are increased, while cortisol levels are decreased.

 Canopy is a 7-year-old hound mix. She is from Louisiana, where she was obtained from a rescue. She’s been a registered therapy dog for just over 2 years. She is also registered as a READ dog which means that she often travels into public schools to help students strengthen their reading skills by allowing students to read to her.Paws for Study Break pic 3

 Her handler, Amy, is a doctoral student in psychology, working on her dissertation on the stress reducing benefits of interacting with therapy dogs. As a therapy dog-handler team, Amy and Canopy visit hospitals, libraries, nursing homes, and schools. They even created a therapy dog program at Kennedy-King College in Chicago in 2013.Paws for Study Break pic 2

The study breaks were sponsored by the Office of Student Development and Academic Counseling along with Pet Partners International.

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Jul 232014
 

Carroll portrait BSOMDr. Robert G. Carroll, a professor of physiology in the Brody School of Medicine, was selected as the 2014 Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecturer by a national society this spring.

It is one of only 12 distinguished lectureships sponsored by the American Physiology Society and approved by the APS Council. The APS Teaching of Physiology section chose Carroll, who presented “The Social Contract of Learning” at the APS Experimental Biology Meeting in San Diego on April 27. 

Bernard (1818-1878) was a famous French scientist and the founder of modern experimental physiology.

 Carroll earned his Ph.D. in 1981 under the direction of Dr. David F. Opdyke at the Department of Physiology of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Newark. This was followed by a three-year post-doctoral fellowship at University of Mississippi Medical Center under the sponsorship of Drs. Thomas E. Lohmeier and Arthur C. Guyton. 

Among his many service roles, Carroll is a past chair the education committee for the American Physiological Society and is chair of the education committee of the International Union of Physiological Sciences. He served as chief editor of the Advances in Physiology Education journal for six years. In the past, he served on the United States Medical Licensing Exam Step I physiology test material development committee of the National Board of Medical Examiners.

Carroll has worked at ECU’s Brody School of Medicine since 1984 where he also serves as interim associate dean of medical education.

Apr 262013
 

Random acts of kindness go a long way toward putting a smile on someone’s face and reshaping a not-so-great day into a special memory that impacts not just the recipient but everyone that person comes in contact with that day.

Next week, imagine how many people you can touch by taking a moment to thank a nurse for a job well-done. First, you will bring a smile to the nurse. Then, the nurse will unknowingly share that smile with patients and colleagues throughout the day and those people will pass the gesture along to the people they interact with. In a busy clinic or hospital, your simple “thank you” to a nurse will touch hundreds of people.

We celebrate National Nurse’s Week in early May to coincide with Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Just as Nightingale tirelessly cared for soldiers during the Crimean War (1853-1856), our nurses care for all types of patients—some are very sick and others are generally healthy.

Make plans to surprise a nurse with a random act of kindness during Nurse’s Week and know that your thoughtful expression will not only make the nurse’s day, but you will share kindness with many people who may need a boost. You will never know it, but your actions may help a patient overcome a frightening diagnosis or help a young family cope with grief. What a terrific way to say thank you and honor our nurses!

Sylvia T. Brown, EdD, RN, CNE
Dean & Professor
ECU College of Nursing

Mar 052013
 

Spring is the time when high school seniors (and their parents) make final decisions about college for the fall. Students who are considering a career in nursing have multiple options and pathways to become a nurse. So, which path will you choose?

Traditional BSN Students
Traditional students who enter East Carolina University as first-year students devote two years to pre-requisite courses before they apply to the College of Nursing. Admitted nursing students begin taking nursing classes in their junior year. Students who bring in transfer hours or Advanced Placement hours may apply to the nursing major early.

FPNLLV: Making ECU Feel like a Small School
Traditional first-year ECU students may apply to live in a learning community for intended nursing majors. Future Pirate Nurse Living and Learning Village students live in one residence hall and are registered for several pre-requisite classes together. Students say the village-model helps them adjust to university life and makes the university seem like a much smaller environment. Registration is now open for the 2013-2014 FPNLLV, and the Future Pirate Nurse Living and Learning Village application is available on the College of Nursing web site.

RIBN
ECU also offers RIBN (Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses), an option that allows students to enroll at the university and an area community college at the same time. In this partnership, students take classes at both schools and earn an associate degree and a bachelor degree in four years. RIBN is often less expensive than attending the traditional on-campus program at ECU.

RN-BSN Option
The RN-BSN Option is for students who complete a two year associate degree nursing program in a community college and return to school to get their bachelor of science in nursing degree. RN-BSN students are Registered Nurses who are seeking the BSN. The curriculum is 100% online, allowing students to work while they go school.

Even though there are several pathways to become a Pirate Nurse, all of the options guarantee that students will have a first-rate experience at a university with a strong record of nursing excellence. ECU graduates more new nurses than any school in North Carolina, and our graduates score high pass rates on the NCLEX-RN national licensure exam.

Which path will you choose?

Feb 152013
 

East Carolina University College of Nursing will be home to a new degree program in the fall! The UNC Board of Governors gave approval for ECU to offer a doctor of nursing practice degree beginning in August 2013.

Recent studies by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Institute of Medicine call for nurses to achieve higher education levels to meet changing healthcare needs. For nurse practitioners and other advance practice nurses this means additional education with a strong focus on clinical practice.

East Carolina’s doctor of nursing practice program coursework is 100% online, and clinical practice sites include primary care clinics, hospitals, and public health care agencies. Students are required to attend skills sessions at the College of Nursing several times a year.

As a leader in distance education, ECU has invested in the technology and resources to make the program successful. The College of Nursing is nationally recognized for online graduate education, so the new degree will be a natural fit in a graduate program with a proven history of successful online course delivery. Students can expect interactive coursework and considerable experience with our virtual clinic environment.

The initial DNP student cohort is for master’s prepared advance practice nurses. The program will be available to Registered Nurses with bachelor’s degrees in fall 2014. Prospective students may contact Dr. Bobby Lowery, director of DNP implementation, for application information.

Sylvia T. Brown, EdD, RN, CNE
Dean and Professor