ECU’s online nursing, business graduate programs rank among best for veterans

 College of Nursing  Comments Off on ECU’s online nursing, business graduate programs rank among best for veterans
Jun 032014
 
ECU ROTC cadet Teddy Protonentis

ECU ROTC cadet Teddy Protonentis holds the flag during a Veterans Day ceremony on campus. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

East Carolina University’s graduate programs in nursing and business rank among the nation’s best in online education for veterans, according to a listing released May 20 by U.S. News & World Report.

The ECU College of Nursing ranked second in the country for masters of nursing programs. The online Master of Business Administration program in the ECU College of Business ranked 15 in the nation.

Now in its second year, U.S. News ranked bachelor’s programs and online master’s programs in business, computer information technology, education, engineering and nursing to help veterans and service members identify high-quality online degree programs to pursue college or advanced degrees under the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

“Veterans and active-duty service members face unique challenges as students, from transitioning between bases and grappling with deployment to balancing work and family life upon return,” said Robert Morse, director of data research for U.S. News, noting the programs’ flexibility.

ECU’s College of Nursing offers seven online options in the master’s of science nursing program: adult-gerontology nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, family nurse practitioner, neonatal nurse practitioner, nursing education, nursing leadership and nurse midwifery.

Students have previously completed undergraduate education in nursing and often have extensive clinical experience. Online coursework is augmented by periodic campus visits for hands-on training and education that is overseen by experienced faculty and community-based preceptors close to the students’ home.

“Our online graduate programs offer the flexibility that veterans and active-duty service members need,” said Dr. Sylvia Brown, College of Nursing dean. “We’re proud that this flexibility gives those who have served our country access to a first-class nursing education.”

During the 2012-2013 academic year, 45 military veterans and active service members were enrolled in the College of Nursing’s online nursing programs.

The online program in ECU’s College of Business is the largest online MBA program in the UNC system. This spring, there were 21 graduate students and 92 undergraduate students identified as veterans who were enrolled in the College of Business.

“Ties between business institutions and the military are crucial to developing leaders who make a difference in their communities,” said Dr. Stan Eakins, dean of the College of Business. “The College of Business is proud to enable members of the military to earn their business degrees online, providing new tools and knowledge that prepare them for their next chapter of life. In turn, veterans bring a level of leadership and maturity to our program, enhancing discussions and adding value for their fellow students.”

ECU’s bachelor’s programs ranked 52 in the listing.

ECU, geographically, sits in the center of the third most concentrated military corridor in the country. Craven, Cumberland, Onslow and Wayne counties are home to six major military installations – the biggest are Fort Bragg and Camp Lejeune – with approximately 125,000 veterans living in the four counties or a neighboring county.

ECU’s Student Veterans Services provides a seamless transition for veterans – both academically and socially – by helping them become fully integrated into the ECU community, said Trish Goltermann, assistant director of Student Veteran Services. “Our office helps ensure that student veterans are successful in their academic pursuits, adjust to the campus environment, and eventually, transition to civilian employment,” she said.

To be ranked by U.S. News, an online degree program had to report participation in four key programs that offer educational benefits to people with military service, such as the GI Bill and membership in the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Consortium. The programs also had to be included in the U.S. News 2014 Best Online Programs rankings released earlier this year. Those programs were measured on criteria including affordability, faculty credentials, student services and reputation, according to U.S. News.

The complete listing can be viewed at http://www.usnews.com.

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Welcome to ECU–intended nursing majors explore their options

 College of Nursing  Comments Off on Welcome to ECU–intended nursing majors explore their options
Jun 182013
 

From now until mid-July, nearly 5,000 new students will visit ECU’s campus for summer orientation. All over campus, students who just graduated from high school are learning about college classes and visiting residence halls to get a feel for life at ECU.

During the two-day orientation visit, intended nursing majors will meet with advisors and administrators from the College of Nursing to learn about the curriculum and student resources. The prerequisites for the nursing program are rigorous and students are well-prepared for entry to the College of Nursing.

The top questions/answers from today’s sessions were:

How many students are admitted to the BSN program each year?
The College of Nursing admits 130 students each semester (260 each year). Students enroll in approximately 60 semester hours of prerequisites before they apply to the College of Nursing in their sophomore year.

What if my child does not get admitted to the College of Nursing?
Fortunately, ECU is a large university that offers 102 undergraduate degree programs for students to explore. Often, students are interested in a healthcare career but nursing is not the best fit for them. We encourage these students to consider their interests and keep their options open by making good grades and taking elective courses that count for several different majors.

Where will my clinical rotations be?
The College of Nursing has partnerships with clinical agencies all over eastern North Carolina. In order to provide students with clinical experiences in many different healthcare settings, students may travel up to 90 minutes from Greenville.

What makes ECU College of Nursing special?
ECU graduates more new nurses than any school in North Carolina. With over 7500 alumni, Pirate Nurses work and live in all parts of NC and the nation. ECU ranks very high state-wide with an average of 96% percent of our students passing the NCLEX-RN licensure exam on the first attempt.

In her orientation welcome presentation, Dean Sylvia Brown proudly tells students that Pirate Nurses are honest, committed and passionate about helping others. As a Pirate Nurse herself, she knows firsthand what the students will experience when they arrive in August!

Visit www.nursing.ecu.edu for more information about ECU College of Nursing.

Laurie Evans, MA
Director of Marketing
ECU College of Nursing

Hint: Nurse’s Week is coming up May 6˗12…

 College of Nursing  Comments Off on Hint: Nurse’s Week is coming up May 6˗12…
Apr 262013
 

Random acts of kindness go a long way toward putting a smile on someone’s face and reshaping a not-so-great day into a special memory that impacts not just the recipient but everyone that person comes in contact with that day.

Next week, imagine how many people you can touch by taking a moment to thank a nurse for a job well-done. First, you will bring a smile to the nurse. Then, the nurse will unknowingly share that smile with patients and colleagues throughout the day and those people will pass the gesture along to the people they interact with. In a busy clinic or hospital, your simple “thank you” to a nurse will touch hundreds of people.

We celebrate National Nurse’s Week in early May to coincide with Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Just as Nightingale tirelessly cared for soldiers during the Crimean War (1853-1856), our nurses care for all types of patients—some are very sick and others are generally healthy.

Make plans to surprise a nurse with a random act of kindness during Nurse’s Week and know that your thoughtful expression will not only make the nurse’s day, but you will share kindness with many people who may need a boost. You will never know it, but your actions may help a patient overcome a frightening diagnosis or help a young family cope with grief. What a terrific way to say thank you and honor our nurses!

Sylvia T. Brown, EdD, RN, CNE
Dean & Professor
ECU College of Nursing

Mar 052013
 

Spring is the time when high school seniors (and their parents) make final decisions about college for the fall. Students who are considering a career in nursing have multiple options and pathways to become a nurse. So, which path will you choose?

Traditional BSN Students
Traditional students who enter East Carolina University as first-year students devote two years to pre-requisite courses before they apply to the College of Nursing. Admitted nursing students begin taking nursing classes in their junior year. Students who bring in transfer hours or Advanced Placement hours may apply to the nursing major early.

FPNLLV: Making ECU Feel like a Small School
Traditional first-year ECU students may apply to live in a learning community for intended nursing majors. Future Pirate Nurse Living and Learning Village students live in one residence hall and are registered for several pre-requisite classes together. Students say the village-model helps them adjust to university life and makes the university seem like a much smaller environment. Registration is now open for the 2013-2014 FPNLLV, and the Future Pirate Nurse Living and Learning Village application is available on the College of Nursing web site.

RIBN
ECU also offers RIBN (Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses), an option that allows students to enroll at the university and an area community college at the same time. In this partnership, students take classes at both schools and earn an associate degree and a bachelor degree in four years. RIBN is often less expensive than attending the traditional on-campus program at ECU.

RN-BSN Option
The RN-BSN Option is for students who complete a two year associate degree nursing program in a community college and return to school to get their bachelor of science in nursing degree. RN-BSN students are Registered Nurses who are seeking the BSN. The curriculum is 100% online, allowing students to work while they go school.

Even though there are several pathways to become a Pirate Nurse, all of the options guarantee that students will have a first-rate experience at a university with a strong record of nursing excellence. ECU graduates more new nurses than any school in North Carolina, and our graduates score high pass rates on the NCLEX-RN national licensure exam.

Which path will you choose?

So, you want to be a nurse?

 College of Nursing  Comments Off on So, you want to be a nurse?
Jan 112013
 

Are you looking for a nursing program that is affordable and convenient?

We are accepting applications for the ENC RIBN project (Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses). RIBN is a partnership between East Carolina University, Beaufort County Community College, Lenoir Community College, Pitt Community College and Roanoke-Chowan Community College where students are enrolled at both a community college and ECU.

Here is a snapshot of the project:

RIBN Features for the Community Colleges:

  • Completion of general education course requirements and an Associate in Applied Science degree in Nursing (AAS) at a designated local community college.
  • Community college counselors and advisors available for assistance.

RIBN Features for East Carolina University:

  • Completion of BSN degree within 4 years.
  • Student success advocate available for assistance.
  • Less expensive than attending the on-campus program at ECU.

You can visit the RIBN website at http://www.nursing.ecu.edu/RIBN.htm or contact Kelly Cleaton (cleatonk@ecu.edu ) for complete information. Applications for the group that begins in August are due Jan. 31.

Sylvia T. Brown, EdD, RN, CNE
Dean and Professor
East Carolina University College of Nursing