Jun 142013
 

Dr. Elizabeth Baxley

East Carolina University’s Brody School of Medicine is one of 11 schools in the nation selected for a $1 million grant from the American Medical Association to change the way it educates students while keeping its focus on rural and underserved populations.

The American Medical Association announced the winners June 14 at its annual meeting in Chicago. ECU will receive funding through the AMA’s $11 million Accelerating Change in Medical Education Initiative aimed at transforming the way future physicians are trained.

“This grant provides Brody and the ECU Division of Health Sciences with the opportunity to create and test new models of medical education. All students will benefit from the changes we are planning,” said Dr. Elizabeth Baxley, senior associate dean for academic affairs and professor of family medicine in the Brody School of Medicine. Dr. Luan Lawson, assistant dean of academic affairs and professor of emergency medicine, is co-principal investigator for the grant.

The university will implement a new comprehensive core curriculum in patient safety and clinical quality improvement for all medical students. It will feature integration with other health-related disciplines to foster interprofessional skills and prepare students to successfully lead health care teams as part of the transformation, Baxley said.

“Our medical schools today not only have the imperative to teach the art and science of medical care, but to train our graduates how to work in, and improve, complex health systems,” Baxley said. “Preparing students to work in teams with other health professionals is a hallmark of the needed changes, as is a better understanding of the ‘health’ of a community and how we can positively impact that.”

Additionally, up to 10 students each year will be selected to become Leaders in Innovative Care Scholars. These students will complete additional course work, lead projects and earn a certificate in health care transformation and leadership.

The grant also will provide training for faculty members through a new Teachers of Quality Academy, which will focus on patient safety, quality improvement and team-based care and explore new ways of engaging students to be more active in their own education, Baxley said.

Strategies will include e-learning, simulation, problem-based learning, clinical skills training and targeted clinical experiences. Emphasis on rural and underserved populations remains a fundamental part of Brody’s mission.

In addition to ECU, the following schools received funding: Indiana University School of Medicine; Mayo Medical School; NYU School of Medicine; Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine; Penn State College of Medicine; The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University; University of California, Davis School of Medicine; University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine; University of Michigan Medical School; and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

The AMA will provide $1 million to each school over five years. A critical component of the AMA’s initiative will be to establish a learning consortium to disseminate rapidly best practices to other medical and health profession schools.

Of the 141 eligible medical schools, 119 – more than 80 percent – submitted letters of intent outlining their proposals in February. In March, 28 individual schools and three collaborative groups of schools were selected to submit full proposals before a national advisory panel worked with the AMA to select the final 11 schools.

For more information about the initiative, visit www.changemeded.org.  

 

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Oct 122012
 

Ross Hall, home of the School of Dental Medicine at ECU. Photo by Cliff Hollis, ECU News Services.

Today, East Carolina University’s School of Dental Medicine will roll out the welcome mat to the new Ledyard E. Ross Hall at a dedication ceremony on the health sciences campus. Students, faculty, staff and the public will celebrate and tour the 188,000-square-foot school beginning at 2 p.m.

The state-of-the-art facility is named for its benefactor and retired Greenville orthodontist Dr. Ledyard E. Ross, class of ’51. It includes 133 operatories, large “smart classroom” learning halls, faculty offices, seminar rooms and a simulation suite, where dental students can practice and perfect hand-skills.

The school welcomed its inaugural class of 52 pre-doctoral students in August 2011 and its second class of 52 students just two months ago. Until now, dental students have been sharing learning space at the Brody Medical Sciences Building.

While students and faculty are thrilled to move into their new home, Ross Hall serves a dual purpose. In addition to educating students, there are plans to provide reduced-fee dental care for low-income patients. The facility will house specialty suites, including pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, special needs and a clinical research area.

The dental school is dedicated to preparing world-class dentists committed to serving the needs of vulnerable North Carolinians. North Carolina averages three dentists per 10,000 people; this is half the national ratio.

In June, the school opened the first of 10 planned community service learning centers to reach rural, underserved populations. Residents and a supervising dentist are already caring for patients at the Ahoskie center.