Joyner Library announces winners of Graduate Student Art and Design Exhibition

Joyner Library has announced the winners of its 10th annual Joyner Library Graduate Student Art and Design Exhibition, located in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the second floor of Joyner Library. Winners were selected from 43 artworks by 21artists that have been on display since the exhibition’s Oct. 20 opening.

The competition is a collaboration between Joyner Library and the School of Art and Design to showcase some of the best work of the year by School of Art and Design students.

“This year marks a decade since Joyner Library began this wonderful collaboration with the School of Art and Design,” said Jan Lewis, director of Joyner Library. “I am always impressed by the students’ talent and hard work.”

Winning the Friends of Joyner Library Purchase Award — the competition’s marquee award that comes with a $1,000 prize — was Katya Harris for her painting, “Strength.

“Selecting the Friends of Joyner Library Purchase Award is one of my favorite responsibilities as library director, even though it is difficult to choose just one,” said Lewis. “‘Strength’ will be a worthy addition to the library’s permanent collection, as it is both a timely and timeless representation of the power of women.”

Four additional award winners were:

Joanne Lang, winner of the College of Fine Arts and Communication $500 Dean’s Merit Award for the metal series “The Early Bird Catches the Worm.”

Robin Carter, winner of the School of Art and Design $350 Director’s Award for the ceramic sculpture, Augury.

Holly Roddenbery, winner of the School of Art and Design $250 Award for the metal sculpture, Mourning Yoke.

Brian Culbertson, winner of the Dowdy Student Store $50 Award for the photograph, “Depersonalization 2.

Juror and ECU alumnus Catherine Coulter Lloyd, an independent curator and ceramic artist in Lugoff, South Carolina was wowed by this year’s entries.

“The gallery was full of well-expressed narratives asking the viewer to read, connect and become more aware,” said Lloyd. “The skillfully crafted narratives pushed the boundaries of traditional medias using strong technical abilities and fearless experimentation,” she continued. “I am impressed by the artists’ dedication to concept without losing the quality of craftsmanship and their abilities to connect visually with their audience.”

Charlotte Fitz Daniels, events and program coordinator at Joyner Library, said one of her favorite aspects of this exhibit is being able to witness the growth of skills and ideas the students gain during the three years they are in the SOAD graduate school program.

“Other than the master of fine arts thesis exhibitions at the Gray Gallery, I am proud to say that Joyner Library is the only other venue at ECU or in the community where graduate students can showcase their artworks all together,” she said.

The exhibition is on display until Jan. 28 in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the second floor of Joyner Library.

–Kelly R. Dilda
University Communications

Joyner Library offers studying students a quick escape

Joyner Library offers a few extras every year during exam time to help students make it through long hours of studying. This year, those extras will come in the form of some warm, fuzzy hugs from therapy dogs and some snacks to help them focus.

Interaction with the dogs is expected to help students relax and enjoy a break from the rigors of exams.

We hope you will plan to visit Joyner on the first floor of the library during the following days and times.

Wednesday, December 6
12pm – 1pm

Thursday, December 7
1pm – 2pm

Monday, December 11
5pm-6pm

-Kelly R. Dilda
University Communications

Joyner Library to host “Racism & Propaganda in Jim Crow Era Pop Culture: A Closer Look”

Joyner Library will host “Racism & Propaganda in Jim Crow Era Pop Culture: A Closer Look,” Nov. 9 from 3:30-5 p.m. in the Janice Hardison Faulker Gallery on the second floor of the library.

Led by associate professors Dr. David Dennard and Dr. Kennetta Perry from the Department of History in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, the program will feature a discussion about the role of propaganda in the history of United States race relations and modern popular culture. Portions of the film Ethnic Notions by California Newsreel will be screened, along with other examples that use images to portray racial stereotypes.

A behind-the-scenes exhibition viewing on the fourth floor of Joyner Library will follow. Guests will be invited to view items from the private collection of Dr. Walter King of Pinehurst. They will experience a self-guided exhibit tour that defines popular racist stereotypes of the Jim Crow era.

Additionally, supplementary items will be on display that demonstrate the ways in which these stereotypes were regularized and adopted by pop culture via the mainstream media, souvenirs, entertainment and advertising.

This is an ECU Wellness Passport Event and is also open to the public.

The program is sponsored by Joyner Library and the African and African American Studies Program.

For more information contact Heather White at 252-328-2870 or whiteh@ecu.edu.

 

Joyner Library celebrates ECU faculty scholarship

Twenty-four ECU faculty were celebrated during the 2017 Joyner Library/Academic Affairs Faculty Author Book Awards during an Oct. 13 reception in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery.

The event celebrated the accomplishments of Division of Academic Affairs faculty who have contributed to the scholarship of higher education by authoring, co-authoring or editing scholarly monographs published between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017.

Eleanor Cook, assistant director for discovery and technology services and academic library services, along with Dr. Ron Mitchelson, provost and senior vice chancellor for academic affairs, presented awards to this year’s recipients.

“The quality of scholarship at ECU is on the rise and is clearly reflected in the breadth and depth of these authors’ contributions,” said Mitchelson. “I can only applaud them for their collective creativity and commitment to the scholarly life. It makes me proud to be a Pirate!”

Published works represented a wide range of topics such as poetry, law and justice, and race issues.

“This recognition is a tangible indication of Joyner Library’s support for East Carolina University authors,” said Cook. “We are pleased to be able to continue this tradition.”

This year’s authors include:

Michael Albers – English
John Bishop – Economics
Nicole Caswell – English
Alethia Cook – Political Science
Tom Douglas – English
Gabrielle Freeman – English
Jeffrey Johnson – English
Armin Krishnan – Political Science
Joyce Middleton – English
Marie Olson Lounsbery – Political Science
Olga Smirnova – Political Science
John Tucker – History
Arthur Carlson – Joyner Library
Venkat Gudivada – Computer Science
Aneil Mishra – Business Management
Crystal Chambers – Educational Leadership
Martin Readon – Educational Leadership
Kimberly Anderson – Literacy Studies
Allison Crowe – Interdisciplinary Professions
Brian Housand – Elementary Education and Middle School Education
Matthew Militello – Educational Leadership
Steven Schmidt – Interdisciplinary Professions
Guli Zhang – Special Education, Foundations and Research
Jessica Christie – Art History

For more information contact Charlotte Fitz Daniels, programs and events coordinator for Joyner Library, at 252 328-0287 or fitzdanielsc16@ecu.edu

-Kelly Rogers Dilda
University Communications

 

Joyner Library celebrates freedom from censorship

Joyner Library hosted its annual Banned Books Read Out event on Sept. 27 by celebrating the value of free and open access to information. Students, staff and faculty participated by reading passages from banned books they found personally meaningful during the afternoon program held in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery, located on the second floor of Joyner Library.

The Department of English partnered with the library for this year’s event by helping promote the freedom to read materials once considered controversial.

Evan Schmoll, collections coordinator for the Teaching Resources Center at Joyner Library and coordinator of this year’s event, said her goal was for the audience to have a greater understanding of what it means to ban books, how censorship is handled in libraries, and how it can affect our right to free speech.

She also wanted the audience to be entertained and informed by the fact that some people can find things objectionable in the same place that others can find great value.

“This event is important because we live in a country that protects our rights as citizens to express free speech, and we need to be reminded that it is also a privilege – not everyone has these rights,” she said. “When ideas and speech are censored, it only harms the community.”

Readings covered a wide range of books including “Swimmy” by Leo Lionni (1963), “Ulysses” by James Joyce, and selected poems from “A Light in the Attic” by Shel Silverstein.

Dr. Gerald Prokopowicz, professor in the department of history, said this event helps to keep people aware that without constant attention, freedom from censorship is always at risk.

“Most people support freedom of expression, but don’t think about it much; the number of fanatics who want to suppress views they don’t like is much smaller, but they think about it all the time,” he said. “This event helps the rest of us remember to stay vigilant.”

Prokopowicz participated by reading “Swimmy,” one of his favorite picture books as a child.

“My father, who taught art, used it in his classes to show the technique of the artist and author,” he said. “When I was a little older, my dad explained that there were people who wanted the book removed from libraries because they thought it taught a communist idea. That surprised me because I thought that Swimmy was just being smart. When I had my own children, I made sure that they had a copy.”

Dr. Corinee Wooten Guy, professor of English and co-coordinator of the Banned Books Read Out, assisted in the planning and brought students over to attend the event.

“I want students to realize the importance of learning and expressing ideas freely, without fear of censorship, even from parents,” she said. “Of course, they should be aware of other people’s feelings and beliefs but also know that censorship is not a new topic, but is centuries old.

“During the presentation, the importance of parental responsibility became evident,” she continued. “Schools do not need to ban books if parents engage their children in discussions of ethics and morality.”

Because student attendees had so many questions about banned books, the program turned into a discussion with much interaction between those speaking, reading and listening.

Schmoll said that after the program concluded, at least five students thanked her for opening their eyes to banned books. One student from the College of Education told her she planned on passing on what she learned to her future students.

“By acknowledging and celebrating freedom of speech, we can hopefully have a future where there is no longer such a thing as a banned book,” said Schmoll.

For more information about this and other programs at Joyner Library contact Charlotte Fitz Daniels, programs and events coordinator for Joyner Library, at Fitzdanielsc16@ecu.edu or (252) 328-0287.

 

 

 

Joyner Library team develops resource to improve student literacy skills

Two faculty members from Joyner Library have produced a new digital resource targeted to help students successfully complete research assignments.

Information Literacy Concepts, an open educational resource created by David Hisle, learning technologies librarian, and Katy Kavanagh Webb, head of research and instructional services, introduces high school, community college and college students to information literacy topics and gives them an overview of how to conduct their own research.

Open educational resources (OERs) are free to access and are openly licensed text, media and other digital assets used for teaching, learning, assessing and research. They also are commonly used in distance education and open and distance learning.

“By choosing to publish their textbook as an OER, Hisle and Webb have not only created a clearly-written, well-organized and thorough text that that can be used in multiple educational settings to teach information literacy concepts, but also one that can be freely customized or modified by other instructors to suit their teaching styles and their students’ learning needs,” said Jan Lewis, director of Joyner Library.

This openly accessible primer also provides learners with an overview of major information literacy concepts identified in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy.

According to its introductory framework, “Students have a greater role and responsibility in creating new knowledge, in understanding the contours and the changing dynamics of the world of information, and in using information, data and scholarship ethically.”

“We want to prepare our students for today’s rapidly changing information landscape,” said Hisle. “Information literacy skills are essential not just in the work they do as student researchers, but also as college graduates who will need to know how to find and evaluate information to meet their real-world information needs.”

Intended learners for this resource include students in their final year of high school as well as those in the first year or two of college. Specifically, these are learners encountering college-level research assignments for the first time.

Because these students are likely unfamiliar with many basic research concepts, this OER will guide them to fulfill the university’s expectations for conducting research and locating high-quality sources for their research-based assignments.

Content includes chapters stemming from navigating search engines, library databases and discovery tools, to evaluating source credibility and recognizing fake news.

“This freely available e-textbook will be a critical supplement for librarians at ECU (and beyond) to give a big-picture view of the skills that students will need to engage in to produce their own high-quality research,” said Webb. “We have tried to write the book in a way that it would be applicable to students in a variety of contexts, whether they are completing assignments for a writing composition course, in their majors or in a semester-long research skills course.”

Information Literacy Concepts is available at http://media.lib.ecu.edu/DE/tutorial/OER/Information_Literacy_Concepts.pdf.

For more information please contact David Hisle at hisled@ecu.edu or Katy Kavanagh Webb at kavanaghk@ecu.edu.

 

–Kelly Rogers Dilda
University Communications

“Beyond Bricks and Mortar” makes another stop on its community tour

“Beyond Bricks and Mortar: Revisiting the Sycamore Hill Community,” a Joyner Library photography project that shared a missing piece in the history of the displaced community, is continuing its traveling tour to reach local community members.

On display Sept. 1 through Sept. 30 at the Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge, visitors and citizens of Greenville and surrounding areas are invited to visit the exhibit and learn about the predominately African American community that was displaced by a redevelopment project in the 1960s.

“We are thrilled by the opportunity to display this exhibition in various community locations,” said Heather White, assistant director for assessment and engagement. “It is central to Joyner Library’s mission to not only help document and preserve regional history and culture, but to also make it publically available.”

Sycamore Hill Missionary Baptist Church was founded in 1860 and was originally known as the African Baptist Church. The name was changed in the 1880s and referred to the sycamore trees surrounding the church’s location on the corner of First and Greene streets. The large brick church featured in the exhibit’s historical photographs was constructed in 1917 and was a Greenville landmark for half a century. When the Town Common Park was created in the late 1960s, both the church and the vibrant community that existed around it were forced to move.

With the support of a North Carolina Arts Council Grassroots Grant and additional support from the Friends of Joyner Library, the Beyond Bricks and Mortar project began in late December, led by a team from Joyner Library including Charlotte Fitz Daniels, programs and events coordinator at Joyner Library, Heather White, assistant director for assessment and engagement at Joyner Library, and ECU graduate and professional photographer Michelle Butterfield.

“We were honored to help the Sycamore Hill community tell their story and excited about the possibilities with this project, said White. “It was overwhelming to have such a large participation in the portrait project, which speaks volumes to the strong sense of community and connection this group continues to feel even years later.”

On Dec. 27 and 28 of 2016, former Sycamore Hill community members and their descendants were photographed as close as possible to the sites of their former homes and church, many of which were located on what is now Greenville’s Town Common. Narratives from the former residents and family members about their memories of living in the Sycamore Hill community were collected by the Joyner Library team to accompany the portraits.

Historical images of the Sycamore Hill Missionary Baptist Church and the surrounding neighborhood from the Joyner Library Digital Collection are also included in the exhibition.

The exhibit illustrates that a community is much more than the bricks and mortar used to construct its homes. The photographs and narratives featured showed how the ties that bind are found in human connections.

Joyner Library Director Janice S. Lewis said, “Many of the people we interviewed were children or teenagers when their lives were disrupted by the destruction of their neighborhood. Their pride in their community, their church, their schools, and their families could not be destroyed, however. We are glad that we are able to preserve and share this small part of their history through the Beyond Bricks and Mortar exhibit.”

The traveling schedule for the exhibit includes one more location this year. From Oct. 3 through Jan. 31, 2018 the exhibit will be on display at the South Greenville Recreation Center.

The Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge is located at 404 Evans St, Greenville, N.C. and open to the public on Tuesday-Friday from 10:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m., on Saturday from 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m., and on Sunday from 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.  For more information about the gallery please call (252) 551-6947.

For more information about this and other Joyner Library projects please contact: Heather White, assistant director for assessment & engagement at (252) 328-2870 or whiteh@ecu.edu 

Joyner Library celebrates excellence in student research and writing

Joyner Library announced the winners of its annual W. Keats Sparrow Writing Award for student research during an Aug. 23 ceremony held in the Janice L. Faulkner Gallery, located on the second floor of the library.

Sponsored by the Friends of Joyner Library, the W. Keats Sparrow Writing Award was named in honor of Dr. W. Keats Sparrow, professor emeritus of English and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The award recognizes excellence in research and writing by students enrolled in English 1100 and 2201 composition classes during the summer and fall of 2016 and spring of 2017 semesters.

“Every August as the fall semester begins, we have the pleasure of recognizing three students whose English composition papers were selected for the W. Keats Sparrow Award,” said Jan Lewis, director for Joyner Library. “It is a wonderful way to start the new academic year and reaffirm the close connections between Joyner Library and the Department of English.”

Eligibility criteria required students’ papers to include a research component using Joyner Library’s resources.

Entries were judged on the quality of the research as well as the quality of the writing by a panel comprised of faculty from the Department of English and Joyner Library. Members of this year’s panel included: Dr. Tracy Ann Morse, director of composition/writing foundations; Grace Horne, teaching instructor, Department of English; and Meghan Wanucha, coordinator of instructional assessment, Joyner Library.

Winning the award for first place — and a $500 prize — was Jasmine M. Perry, in the department of Psychology in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts & Sciences, for “Homophobic Attitudes in Men.”

“This award means a lot to me,” said Perry. “In my life I have never been first place at anything, so winning this award shows how I have grown as a person, and it shows how dedicated I am to my area of study.”

Perry said the inspiration behind her winning paper came from personal experiences with friends and family members that are homosexual.

“I know that ‘coming out’ is a hard thing to do, and it requires a lot of confidence and a strong support system,” she said. “If people around you are homophobic it can lead to emotional turmoil and possibly suicide. I am so empathetic when I hear or read stories about people being bullied or abused due to their sexuality.”

Two additional award winners were:

Jenna M. Murdock, majoring in elementary education in the College of Education, in second place — a $300 prize — for “Motivating Students to Read.”

Carly E. Shomsky, in the department of Recreation and Leisure Studies in the College of Health and Human Performance, in third place — a $150 prize — for “Sensory Processing Disorder.”

Second-place winner Jenna Murdock said the competition was the perfect opportunity for her to do more research on how to motivate students to read required texts. “I really enjoyed putting this paper together and it was more than just an assignment I completed for a grade,” she said. “I was able to learn so much new and valuable information that will help me become a better teacher in the future.”

“I think it’s wonderful that Joyner Library offers awards and competitions for students,” she said. “It helps further our writing skills and allows us to explore the many resources offered by the library.”

Carly Shomsky, the third-place winner, believes students really benefit from the opportunity to participate in Joyner Libraries awards and competitions. “It not only encourages students to receive good grades, but it also offers them the feeling of accomplishment,” she said.

“This award showed me how far I have come within my writing and as a person. Hard work and determination really do pay off.”

Also deserving recognition are the instructors of the English 2201 sections that produced the winners.  Dr. Tracy Ann Morse was Jasmine Perry’s and Jenna Murdock’s instructor, and Marc Petersen was Carly Shomsky’s instructor.

“This year’s award recipients clearly selected topics relevant to their lives and majors and used the assignment to improve their discipline-based research and writing skills,” said Lewis. “Congratulations to each of them for their outstanding work.”

For more information on how to participate in next year’s awards, contact David Hisle at 328-4978 or by email at hisled@ecu.edu.

Joyner Library exhibits photographic workings of environmental movements

Joyner Library is hosting the exhibit “Cry Ecology: Gibson Lemon and the Beeline Highway” in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the second floor of the library. On display from Aug. 8 through Oct. 8, the exhibit showcases a collection of photography based on two bodies of work by Linda Adele Goodine, Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professor for the School of Art and Design at East Carolina University.

“Personally, I am drawn to her work because of its visual appeal as well as the deeper concepts that she explores in regards to how we manipulate land for our own ambitions and ideals,” said Charlotte Fitz-Daniels, programs and events coordinator for Joyner Library.

Goodine’s work has appeared in more than 40 solo exhibitions with a substantial national and international exhibition presence. She is also the recipient of 27 grants and fellowships.

“Cry Ecology is a conversation to be heard about the importance of our environment in which we live and why we should take better care of it,” Goodine explained. “The color and the inclusion of animals and plants were very calculated and constructed to talk about hierarchies and how we treat various aspects of living things, whether they are produced as a commodity or whether they are wild.”

“One unlucky rabbit became the impetus for my first still life,” she said of her Gibson Lemon series. “A click of the shutter, and an image emerged of a contemporary culture in transition, attempting to reconcile the cultivation of nature with the politics of production and eradication.”

In the New Zealand images, also part of the Gibson Lemon series, Goodine says she fashions a constructed still life in one frame, layering foreground, middle ground and background to create a relevant historical, social and cultural document.

“In New Zealand, as in the United States, nature is continuously manipulated for display and consumption,” she said. “My project explores the remaking of the contemporary material world through the metaphor of sustainable farming.”

In her Beeline Highway series, Goodine says she wants to investigate, present and create a dialogue about the loss of balance between technology, agriculture, commerce and conservation in the Everglades.

“The themes explored in Beeline Highway continue my earlier interest in America’s relationship to land and nature,” she explains. “As nature continues to be manipulated for display and consumption in many parts of the United States, the Florida Everglades represents a landscape at odds with the politics and challenges of production. It is my hope that these images of nature’s survival under the assault of modernity may inspire those who hope and work for its preservation.”

“We are excited to feature the work of Linda Adele Goodine, Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professor at Joyner Library,” said Heather White, assistant director for assessment and engagement. “Her exhibition of large, lush photographs is an impressive and exquisite display of work.”

Joyner Library will also hold a reception with artist remarks on Thursday, Sept. 7 from 5-7 p.m. in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery.

For more information contact Charlotte Fitz Daniels at fitzdanielsc16@ecu.edu or 252-328-0287.

 

 

 

Joyner Library celebrates twelve service award recipients

Joyner Library celebrated the 2017 Service Awards of twelve library recipients during a July 27 reception in the Faulkner Gallery.

The Service Awards Program is designed to serve as a sign of ECU’s appreciation towards the dedicated service its employees provide to the State of North Carolina and that of the UNC education system throughout their tenure.  Service awards are presented to each eligible employee at milestone dates in their career until retirement.

“Our honorees share a commitment to serving the public and making a positive difference through their work,” said Joyner Library Director, Jan Lewis. “Thanks to them – and to all of our staff members – for what they do every day to provide outstanding library services to the ECU community.”

Carolyn Willis and Ramona Okechukwu were each awarded for the longest amount of service at twenty-five years, followed by Hazel Walker with twenty years of service.

Celebrating fifteen years of service were Lisa Barricella and John Lawrence and with ten years of service, Chris Hodges and Tracie Hampton were also recognized.

Five-year service awards went to Katy Webb, Amanda Vinogradov, Brooke Tolar, Matt Clark, and Judith Barber.