NEW: The Return, a photography exhibit by Linda Fox

TheReturnExhibit_LfoxPLASMA

Artist Statement:

           Creative processes in which we work — painting, literature, and photography — are not that dissimilar to the creative life processes in which we are immersed and those that surround us. Death as a creative process is a necessary step toward regeneration and renewal. I approach my photographic subjects with the understanding that these images of what I am seeing are also in the midst of a creative process. I utilized the method of series or sequence – to hold the moment in the death-life process, a moment that needed to be suspended, so one could look at it with more than a glance, have a moment to look into time and change, to study its movement and its confusion an   beauty – so that the effect of an image captured in a series on the observer would hold a more lasting, fluid impression.

I photograph common animals encountered in ordinary small town life: animals one might see by the side of the road, a domesticated dog killed by a car, a neighborhood cat, a discarded catfish caught in a nearby river and left behind, a mourning dove that has broken its neck, a deer in season killed by local hunters, a feral fox killed on the highway. These subjects are currently part of a human being’s conscious and unconscious awareness of the animal world in a typical small town. They may be a part but not a necessary part of the human world (excluding the emotional relationship between pet owner and pet); that is, they are elements of the world viewed from an unaffected distance.

“The Return” attempts to recreate visions of the natural world that are more harmonious and less compartmentalized, more wholesome, less segmented, and avoid the segregation of “diseased” versus “healthy,” “polluted” versus “unpolluted,” or “dead” versus “living,” In some small way, I am aiming to encourage a view of the natural world that sees value and beauty in all of its processes.

These photographs were taken with a Nikon D300s digital camera. The images were edited in Adobe Photoshop CS5 on a 2011, 27 in. Apple IMAC. The 20 prints were made on an Epson Stylus Pro 9800 wide-format printer using “Breathing Color: Vibrance Rag” 325GSM fine art paper with high gloss Baryta finish, 100% cotton.

Bio:

Linda Andrea Fox received her MFA and BFA in Photography from East Carolina University School of Art and Design. For eight years she served as the biomedical photographer for Duke University Hospital and the Brody School of Medicine of ECU. She was born in California.