Author Reception and Book Signing: Alan R. Bailey

Joyner Library is hosting an Author Reception and Book Signing for Alan R. Bailey on Friday, August 15, 2014.  Join us from 4:00-6:00pm in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the second floor.

Copies of Bailey’s book “Building a Core Print Collection for Preschoolers” will be available for purchase.

RSVP to wainwrightd@ecu.edu by August 11.

2014 W. Keats Sparrow Writing Awards

Join us for the W. Keats Sparrow Writing Awards on August 27, 2014 from 5:00-6:00pm in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the second floor.  Sponsored by the Friends of Joyner Library, this award recognizes excellence in research and writing by students in ECU’s English 1100 & 1200 classes.

The award is named in honor of the late Dr. W. Keats Sparrow, Professor Emeritus of English and former Dean of the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

RSVP to wainwrightd@ecu.edu

Work Study Job Fair at Joyner Library

Joyner Library Work Study Job Fair will be held on August 28, 2014 at 2:00pm.  Join us to learn about student employment opportunities.  All students are welcome to join the fair.  The fair will be held from 2:00-4:00pm in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the second floor.

Joyner Library Recovers From Major Water Leak

GREENVILLE, N.C. (7/2/2014) Joyner Library personnel discovered a major water leak on June 29, 2014.  Initial findings included standing water in the stacks on the second floor with a major leak from a rusted pipe fitting in the conservation lab located between the North Carolina Collection and University Archives on the third floor.

The library’s disaster response team was activated and campus police and ECU’s facility services reported to the site along with CareMaster Fire and Restoration.

“Thank you to the library first responders who found the leak’s source and stopped it to prevent additional damage.  Thanks also to the many library staff members who reported on their day off to assist with the recovery effort,” says Janice Lewis, interim dean of Joyner Library.

Damage to the collections included forty-six boxes and 25 bundles of the University Archives holdings.  Approximately 1500 books in the general collection were affected.  Initial loss estimates are $30,000 for 600 books and $5000 to repair approximately 500 books.  The remaining materials will be restored at minimal cost.

Joyner Library salvage teams followed standard disaster protocol by triaging water-damaged materials.  General collection books were placed on water absorbent paper, positioned appropriately and fanned out.  Rare and one-of-a-kind holdings from Archives were layered between Reemay and blotting paper.  All materials were centralized in containment areas with dehumidifiers and fans.  Processing time for the Archives materials is estimated at seven to ten days.  Materials from the general collection could take up to four months to be returned to circulation.

“We were fortunate that the response time was so quick,” says Eleanor Cook, assistant director for Discovery and Technology Services and disaster response team coordinator.  “It was a great team effort by Joyner personnel and in some cases their families.  The disaster response team had a tabletop exercise planned over the summer.  This live drill was an unexpected test of our preparedness and couldn’t have been more smooth.”

The building suffered damage to ceiling tiles, walls, and carpet and floor areas on the second and third floors.  The estimated costs for repair and clean up are ongoing.  The North Carolina Collection (NCC) remains closed to the public; however, unaffected materials may be requested and delivered as needed by the Circulation or Special Collections staff.  The NCC service desk anticipates reopening in ten days.

Subject liaison librarians will work in conjunction with ECU faculty on replacing necessary materials lost from the general collection over the fall semester.

For more information, please contact Eleanor Cook at 252.328.2598.

Joyner Library Volunteers

Barricella, Lisa   Bradshaw, Gloria   Carlson, Arthur   Conlin, June   Conner, Floyd

Cook,  Eleanor   Dembo, Jonathan   Galetka, Leland   Gathercole, Erin   Guill, Kacy

Hampton, Tracie   Hardison, Nanette   Joyner, Jennifer   Lawrence, John

Lewis, Jan   Lundin, Lynnette   Mayo, Jan   Perkins, David   Reece, Michael

Reynolds, Matt   Rhodes, Tamara   Rolison, Joe   Sanders, Mark

Sauter, Dale   Scott, Ralph   Shirkey, Cindy   Stilley, Brandon

Tuthill, Jeff   Whaley, Matt   Elmore Martha    Elmore Mickey1 2 3 4# # #

Joyner Library Grant Award Leads to $119,500 Archival Project

GREENVILLE, N.C. (6/13/2014) – The National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission has awarded a grant to the Special Collections Division at Joyner Library to process the archives of the Institute of Outdoor Theatre.  With matching funds from East Carolina University, Joyner Library and the IOT, the total project budget exceeds $119,500, according to Dr. Michael C. Hardy, director of the IOT, which is located at the university.

The one-year, $56,290 grant is part of the Commission’s Documenting Democracy: Access to Historical Records program which funds projects that promote the preservation and use of the nation’s most valuable archival resources. The grant will also allow for the creation of a comprehensive online archive allowing worldwide access to the IOT archive.

“I am pleased that Joyner Library can partner with ECU’s College of Fine Arts and Communication and the Institute of Outdoor Theatre to provide access to the archives to researchers worldwide,” said Janice S. Lewis, interim dean of Joyner Library. “The photographs, video and audio recordings, publicity materials, feasibility studies, original research, and other materials will provide unparalleled insights into the challenges and successes experienced by outdoor theatres and the communities in which they operate. I look forward to sharing its riches with a broader audience.”

Since its founding in 1963, the IOT has amassed a considerable collection related to more than 600 outdoor theatres. The earliest of those theatres began in the 1920s. The institute was founded with the purpose of supporting these theatres with technical assistance, documentation of best practices in the field, and management and feasibility studies.

“The archival materials accumulated by the Institute of Outdoor Theatre over the past 50 years provide a unique view of a distinct movement in American Theatre history,” said Hardy. “We are very pleased to have received this important recognition of the quality of our archives from the National Archive’s panel of experts, and we look forward to making them available to future researchers when this project is complete.”

The audience for these materials includes set builders, regional and social historians, folklorists, those concentrating on performing arts history, tourism history and those interested in the general origin of historical outdoor drama in the United States, as well as Shakespeare and Renaissance festivals and outdoor theatre.

Assistant Director for Special Collections Kacy Guill said, “Once processed, we believe the IOT collection will have appeal to ECU students as well as national and international researchers.”

For more information, contact Dale Sauter, principal investigator and interim head of service, at 252.328.0275 or sauterd@ecu.edu.

Photos and materials "Unto These Hills" and "The Lost Colony"  — both North Carolina outdoor productions — will be included in the Institute of Outdoor Theatre's archival project. This photo shows the Eagle Dance from "Unto These Hills." Photo by Chris McCoy.

Photos and materials “Unto These Hills” and “The Lost Colony” — both North Carolina outdoor productions — will be included in the Institute of Outdoor Theatre’s archival project. This photo shows the Eagle Dance from “Unto These Hills.” Photo by Chris McCoy.

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Edible Book Festival Winners Announced

ECU’s Joyner Library hosts annual Edible Book Festival

GREENVILLE, N.C. (Mar. 31, 2014) – Joyner Library at East Carolina University hosted its third annual Edible Book Festival on Saturday, March 29.

“The Edible Book Festival is held annually internationally around the first of April,” says Eleanor Cook, festival director and assistant director for Discovery and Technology Services.  “Joyner Library has partnered with the ECU Youth Arts Festival for the past three years. The Edible Book celebrates books and culinary craftsmanship that draws upon the creativity of community members,” said Cook.

Juried categories included Most Edible, Least Edible, Wittiest, Best in Show/Youth and Adult.  This year’s judges were Greenville Banks, Jr and Cecilia Moore-Cobb from the Friends of Joyner Library Board of Directors.

The silent auction featured professional cakes donated by Aramark/ECU and Lowe’s Foods. “Proceeds of more than $100 from the silent auction and other voluntary donations received during the event benefit the Joyner Library Preservation & Conservation fund,” says Lisa Barricella, department head of Monographic Acquisitions & Preservation/Conservation.  “This fund helps to support the purchase of equipment and materials used in Joyner’s conservation labs where technicians conserve books, documents, manuscripts and photographs for long-term access,” said Barricella.

2014 winners:

  • Most Edible:  “Horton Hears a Who!” by Dr. Seuss.  Makayla Gilland (Youth entry)
  • Least Edible:  “Fish! Tales” by Stephen Lundin et al.  Gloria Bradshaw
  • Wittiest:  “Cold Mountain” (Dew) by Charles Frazier.  Stephanie Hedgepeth
  • Best in Show/Youth:  “Little House on the Prairie” by Laura Ingalls Wilder.  Walker Bixby
  • Best in Show/Adult:  “Swiss (Cheese) Family Robinson” by Johann David Wyss.  Wesley Dills

Winners each received a handcrafted notebook, winner’s ribbon, and a gift certificate.  Photos of entries may be viewed at https://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/techsrv/edibleabout.cfmhortonMost Edible winner Makayla Gilland

swissBest in Show/Adult winner Wesley Dills

For information on this project or Joyner Library, contact Dawn Wainwright at 252.328.4090 or wainwrightd@ecu.edu

Joyner Library to cut ribbon on Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery

Joyner Library to cut ribbon on Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery

GREENVILLE, N.C. (3/07/2014) – Former North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt Jr. will be among those in attendance Tuesday, March 11 at 5:30 p.m. when a renovated gallery and study space in Joyner Library is dedicated to honor East Carolina University alumna Janice Hardison Faulkner.

The Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery is a dynamic space that will serve a variety of needs. The renovations define the formerly open space as a true exhibit area to showcase art created by ECU faculty and students. The 3,700-square-foot gallery area will accommodate up to 200 guests.

State of the art technology includes two 80-inch LCD panels for digital art, two projectors with 100-inch retractable screens and 16 ceiling speakers. Art will be displayed with an AS Hanging System, which uses cables and hooks to hang traditionally framed and non-traditional works.

In addition to Hunt, who appointed Faulkner to lead reforms in several state offices while he was governor, ceremony speakers will include ECU administrators Marilyn Sheerer, provost, and Austin Bunch; Janice S. Lewis, interim dean of Joyner Library; and Michael Priddy.

The Joyner Library Advancement Council selected the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery as its flagship project in fall 2012. Chartered in 2010, the council provides advocacy, consultation and opportunity for involvement with library initiatives.

Council members, then chaired by Harry W. Stubbs IV and vice chair Michael D. Priddy, launched a campaign that raised in excess of $130,000. More than 125 donors rallied behind the cause.

“I don’t know what it is about my life experience that attracts people to celebration of it, but I sure am glad,” Faulkner said in an August 2012 interview about the project in The Daily Reflector.

“The opportunity to name the gallery in honor of Janice Hardison Faulkner was especially important to me,” said Priddy, former Pitt County School superintendent and current council chair. “I am thankful that many felt called to be a part of this endeavor. I am also pleased that we can not only honor Janice, but also recognize everyone who made this project come to life. Their names are immortalized, and they’ll warm Janice’s heart each time she sees or hears their names.”

Funding was also provided by ECU’s Division of Academic Affairs, Joyner Library and the Fred Timms Langford and Verona Lee Joyner Langford Endowment.

“It is a unique and inviting venue for lectures, programs, conferences and receptions. It is a space for experimentation with the new forms of displaying art using the technologies embedded in the gallery. It is a place where students can study, relax and learn. It is a tangible recognition of the life-long contributions Janice Hardison Faulkner has made to East Carolina University and the state of North Carolina,” said Lewis.

When not in use for planned events, the space will be furnished with comfortable seating for student study. The gallery includes a green room that doubles as a place for large group study and collaboration when not reserved for presentations.

In an interview with ECU News Services published in December 2012, Faulkner said of the project: “One of the first things we do when we’re separated from home as college students is to build a little nest, a place that is familiar and comfortable, and meets the requirements you’re looking for like a quiet place to study or a place to put your feet up while you read. So it (the gallery) has an ambiance that is missing from the strictly academic structures (on campus).”

At the entrance of the gallery, a tribute case honors Faulkner. The items on display represent important moments in her outstanding career. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English from then East Carolina College. In 1998, Faulkner received an honorary doctorate from ECU.

Among her many accolades, Faulkner was recognized by ECU in 1993 with its Outstanding Alumni Award and in 2007 as one of ECU’s 100 Incredible Women by the ECU Women’s Roundtable. She received the Jarvis Medal in 2009, East Carolina’s highest honor, and in 2012 received the State of North Carolina Award, the highest civilian award given by the state.

“Janice Hardison Faulkner breathed life into the people of our state through her teaching, her leadership and especially her friendship. Being in her presence creates excitement, not quite knowing what wisdom or admonition she might offer at any moment,” said Priddy.

“This gallery is just like her, a place for the sharing of thought, insight and inspiration,” he added. “For me, that is a library: a place where those things permeate the souls of all who enter. Being able to recognize her life and contributions and breathing energy into a gathering space came together naturally for the council and her lifelong friends and supporters.”

For more information, contact Dawn Wainwright at 252-328-4090 or wainwrightd@ecu.edu.

Joyner Library Pet Food Drive

Joyner Library preservation technician Tracie Hampton organized collection drive for The Pet Food Pantry of Eastern North Carolina. The PFPENC is a new program that provides free pet food through donations to individuals who cannot otherwise afford to feed their pets.  Sometimes the ability to feed a pet is the one thing that is standing between a person keeping that pet in a loving home and feeling there is no option but to leave them in a shelter.  

Pet food drive

Pictured is Tracie, the pet food collected, and Preservation/Conservation mascot Presley Connor.

Fossil Exhibit at Joyner Library: “Paleontology of Eastern North Carolina”

Through August 31st, the North Carolina Collection at J. Y. Joyner Library is exhibiting fossils from Eastern North Carolina.  The fossils are from the private collections of William O’Neal and Jay Holley. They have been collected over a period of roughly forty years. Mr. Holley is a geologist and instructor who provided technical expertise as well as fossils. The fossils on display are examples of the kind of items that can be found in local waterways, quarries, and other excavations. There are also explanatory materials from books and electronic resources that can be accessed through Joyner Library.

paleonFBpicThe fossils are from a wide date range. The oldest are from the Cretaceous Period, and can be as old as sixty-five million years plus. The youngest are from the Quaternary Period, the Pleistocene Epoch, or the age of large land mammals. These can be as old as 1.8 million years. The primary fossil bearing sediments from the region are marine in nature. The Coastal Plain has not always been dry land. The sands and clays of the area offer ready evidence of the abundance of sea creatures. Limestone from the Southern part of the state tells the same story.

The exhibit can be viewed on the third floor of Joyner Library in the North Carolina Collection. Tours can be arranged, and school groups are welcome. Further information can be obtained at 328-6601 or onealw@ecu.edu .