Edible Book Festival Winners Announced

ECU’s Joyner Library hosts annual Edible Book Festival

GREENVILLE, N.C. (Mar. 31, 2014) – Joyner Library at East Carolina University hosted its third annual Edible Book Festival on Saturday, March 29.

“The Edible Book Festival is held annually internationally around the first of April,” says Eleanor Cook, festival director and assistant director for Discovery and Technology Services.  “Joyner Library has partnered with the ECU Youth Arts Festival for the past three years. The Edible Book celebrates books and culinary craftsmanship that draws upon the creativity of community members,” said Cook.

Juried categories included Most Edible, Least Edible, Wittiest, Best in Show/Youth and Adult.  This year’s judges were Greenville Banks, Jr and Cecilia Moore-Cobb from the Friends of Joyner Library Board of Directors.

The silent auction featured professional cakes donated by Aramark/ECU and Lowe’s Foods. “Proceeds of more than $100 from the silent auction and other voluntary donations received during the event benefit the Joyner Library Preservation & Conservation fund,” says Lisa Barricella, department head of Monographic Acquisitions & Preservation/Conservation.  “This fund helps to support the purchase of equipment and materials used in Joyner’s conservation labs where technicians conserve books, documents, manuscripts and photographs for long-term access,” said Barricella.

2014 winners:

  • Most Edible:  “Horton Hears a Who!” by Dr. Seuss.  Makayla Gilland (Youth entry)
  • Least Edible:  “Fish! Tales” by Stephen Lundin et al.  Gloria Bradshaw
  • Wittiest:  “Cold Mountain” (Dew) by Charles Frazier.  Stephanie Hedgepeth
  • Best in Show/Youth:  “Little House on the Prairie” by Laura Ingalls Wilder.  Walker Bixby
  • Best in Show/Adult:  “Swiss (Cheese) Family Robinson” by Johann David Wyss.  Wesley Dills

Winners each received a handcrafted notebook, winner’s ribbon, and a gift certificate.  Photos of entries may be viewed at https://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/techsrv/edibleabout.cfmhortonMost Edible winner Makayla Gilland

swissBest in Show/Adult winner Wesley Dills

For information on this project or Joyner Library, contact Dawn Wainwright at 252.328.4090 or wainwrightd@ecu.edu

Joyner Library to cut ribbon on Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery

Joyner Library to cut ribbon on Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery

GREENVILLE, N.C. (3/07/2014) – Former North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt Jr. will be among those in attendance Tuesday, March 11 at 5:30 p.m. when a renovated gallery and study space in Joyner Library is dedicated to honor East Carolina University alumna Janice Hardison Faulkner.

The Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery is a dynamic space that will serve a variety of needs. The renovations define the formerly open space as a true exhibit area to showcase art created by ECU faculty and students. The 3,700-square-foot gallery area will accommodate up to 200 guests.

State of the art technology includes two 80-inch LCD panels for digital art, two projectors with 100-inch retractable screens and 16 ceiling speakers. Art will be displayed with an AS Hanging System, which uses cables and hooks to hang traditionally framed and non-traditional works.

In addition to Hunt, who appointed Faulkner to lead reforms in several state offices while he was governor, ceremony speakers will include ECU administrators Marilyn Sheerer, provost, and Austin Bunch; Janice S. Lewis, interim dean of Joyner Library; and Michael Priddy.

The Joyner Library Advancement Council selected the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery as its flagship project in fall 2012. Chartered in 2010, the council provides advocacy, consultation and opportunity for involvement with library initiatives.

Council members, then chaired by Harry W. Stubbs IV and vice chair Michael D. Priddy, launched a campaign that raised in excess of $130,000. More than 125 donors rallied behind the cause.

“I don’t know what it is about my life experience that attracts people to celebration of it, but I sure am glad,” Faulkner said in an August 2012 interview about the project in The Daily Reflector.

“The opportunity to name the gallery in honor of Janice Hardison Faulkner was especially important to me,” said Priddy, former Pitt County School superintendent and current council chair. “I am thankful that many felt called to be a part of this endeavor. I am also pleased that we can not only honor Janice, but also recognize everyone who made this project come to life. Their names are immortalized, and they’ll warm Janice’s heart each time she sees or hears their names.”

Funding was also provided by ECU’s Division of Academic Affairs, Joyner Library and the Fred Timms Langford and Verona Lee Joyner Langford Endowment.

“It is a unique and inviting venue for lectures, programs, conferences and receptions. It is a space for experimentation with the new forms of displaying art using the technologies embedded in the gallery. It is a place where students can study, relax and learn. It is a tangible recognition of the life-long contributions Janice Hardison Faulkner has made to East Carolina University and the state of North Carolina,” said Lewis.

When not in use for planned events, the space will be furnished with comfortable seating for student study. The gallery includes a green room that doubles as a place for large group study and collaboration when not reserved for presentations.

In an interview with ECU News Services published in December 2012, Faulkner said of the project: “One of the first things we do when we’re separated from home as college students is to build a little nest, a place that is familiar and comfortable, and meets the requirements you’re looking for like a quiet place to study or a place to put your feet up while you read. So it (the gallery) has an ambiance that is missing from the strictly academic structures (on campus).”

At the entrance of the gallery, a tribute case honors Faulkner. The items on display represent important moments in her outstanding career. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English from then East Carolina College. In 1998, Faulkner received an honorary doctorate from ECU.

Among her many accolades, Faulkner was recognized by ECU in 1993 with its Outstanding Alumni Award and in 2007 as one of ECU’s 100 Incredible Women by the ECU Women’s Roundtable. She received the Jarvis Medal in 2009, East Carolina’s highest honor, and in 2012 received the State of North Carolina Award, the highest civilian award given by the state.

“Janice Hardison Faulkner breathed life into the people of our state through her teaching, her leadership and especially her friendship. Being in her presence creates excitement, not quite knowing what wisdom or admonition she might offer at any moment,” said Priddy.

“This gallery is just like her, a place for the sharing of thought, insight and inspiration,” he added. “For me, that is a library: a place where those things permeate the souls of all who enter. Being able to recognize her life and contributions and breathing energy into a gathering space came together naturally for the council and her lifelong friends and supporters.”

For more information, contact Dawn Wainwright at 252-328-4090 or wainwrightd@ecu.edu.

Joyner Library Pet Food Drive

Joyner Library preservation technician Tracie Hampton organized collection drive for The Pet Food Pantry of Eastern North Carolina. The PFPENC is a new program that provides free pet food through donations to individuals who cannot otherwise afford to feed their pets.  Sometimes the ability to feed a pet is the one thing that is standing between a person keeping that pet in a loving home and feeling there is no option but to leave them in a shelter.  

Pet food drive

Pictured is Tracie, the pet food collected, and Preservation/Conservation mascot Presley Connor.

Fossil Exhibit at Joyner Library: “Paleontology of Eastern North Carolina”

Through August 31st, the North Carolina Collection at J. Y. Joyner Library is exhibiting fossils from Eastern North Carolina.  The fossils are from the private collections of William O’Neal and Jay Holley. They have been collected over a period of roughly forty years. Mr. Holley is a geologist and instructor who provided technical expertise as well as fossils. The fossils on display are examples of the kind of items that can be found in local waterways, quarries, and other excavations. There are also explanatory materials from books and electronic resources that can be accessed through Joyner Library.

paleonFBpicThe fossils are from a wide date range. The oldest are from the Cretaceous Period, and can be as old as sixty-five million years plus. The youngest are from the Quaternary Period, the Pleistocene Epoch, or the age of large land mammals. These can be as old as 1.8 million years. The primary fossil bearing sediments from the region are marine in nature. The Coastal Plain has not always been dry land. The sands and clays of the area offer ready evidence of the abundance of sea creatures. Limestone from the Southern part of the state tells the same story.

The exhibit can be viewed on the third floor of Joyner Library in the North Carolina Collection. Tours can be arranged, and school groups are welcome. Further information can be obtained at 328-6601 or onealw@ecu.edu .

Fahrenheit 451…..On Display

We are celebrating 60 Years of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, published in 1953. Named one of the most important books of the 20th century, this book is still relevant.

Stop by the Exhibit Gallery on the 2nd floor, to view the display celebrating this classic book as we approach Banned Book Week from September 22nd – 28th.