ECU’s Joyner Library 5th Graduate Student Art and Design Exhibition Runs Through January 15th

GREENVILLE, N.C. (12/3/2012) – Joyner Library at East Carolina University celebrated the opening reception and award ceremony for the 5th Annual Graduate Student Art and Design Exhibition on November 15th.

This exhibition, held every fall semester, showcases the talent and hard work of ECU graduate students and provides an inspirational learning environment for all students, faculty, and library patrons.  Cash awards were given, with one funded by the Friends of Joyner Library to add original art to the Library’s permanent collection.  Diverse works include paintings and drawings, textile and metal designs, sculpture, photography, pottery, and more.

“The works by the 17 artists participating in this year’s exhibition are inspiring, creative, and thought-provoking.  Joyner Library is excited to host this exhibit and to provide an opportunity for the artists to share their talent with the community and to be recognized for their work,” says Jan Lewis, interim dean of Academic Library & Learning Resources.

C. Barbour Strickland III served as this year’s juror.  With more than 30 years of experience in N.C. arts, Strickland is the owner of FrameMakers, Strickland Art Resources & Gallery, and The Arts Connection website.  He is the former art director of the Greenville Museum of Art and currently serves on boards of art organizations statewide, including as president of the Friends of ECU’s School of Art and Design.

The exhibit runs through January 15, 2013 and is located in the exhibit gallery on the second floor of the library.  The exhibit viewing is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Dawn Wainwright at 252.328.4090.

2012 Winners

College of Fine Arts & Communication Dean’s Merit Award $400
Artist: Audrey Peck
Title: “Bark Necklace”
Medium: Bark, Copper, Steel, Brass, and Paper

 

Friends of Joyner Library Purchase Award $1000
Artist: Graham Erisman
Title: “Emotions of Burden”
Medium: Cast Iron & Fabricated Steel

Uptown Art Supply and Gallery at UBE $100 Gift Certificate
Artist: Catherine Stasevich
Title: “Pond Life Series: Muddy Bottoms Mug with Brown Bullhead”
Medium: Wood Fired Ceramics

School of Art and Design Director’s Award $400
Artist: Lorraine Turi
Title: “Past Life Portrait # 2”
Medium: Scanogram – Inkjet

Graduate Schools Dean’s Award $300
Artist: Kevin Vanek
Title: “Automatons of Industry”
Medium: Cast Iron

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Friends of Joyner Library to Host Margaret Maron April 19th

The Friends of Joyner Library at East Carolina University
Cordially invite you and a guest to the Annual Spring Banquet
On Thursday April 19, 2012 at 6:30 in the evening at the Greenville Country Club

Guest speaker/mystery writer

Margaret Maron

To reserve your seat, RSVP by Friday April 6, 2012, make check payable to The Friends of Joyner Library in the amount of
$35 per person for Friends members or $45 per person for non-Friends members.  Mail to Blythe Tennent, 2400 Joyner Library, Mail Stop 516 East Carolina University,
Greenville NC 27858.

Business Attire; Information 252-328-2771

Joyner Library’s 2012 School of Art and Design Faculty Art Exhibition

“Storm Season: Louisiana’s Disappearing Wetlands”
Opening reception on March 15, 2012 •  5:30 pm  •  Exhibit Gallery, 2nd floor

Featuring Photographic work by:
DANIEL KARIKO, Area Coordinator for Photography

This series of photographs represents a long-term investigation of disappearing wetlands and barrier islands in south Louisiana, due to human and natural activity.

I started photographing in Barataria- Terrebonne National Estuary in South Louisiana in the summer of 1999. Since the beginning of my project, the area suffered a number of major hurricanes including Katrina and Rita, and recent large oil spill catastrophe. The pinhole photographs in this series range from 2006 until May of 2011, just as the last of the visible oil from the Deepwater Horizon platform was being cleaned from barrier islands.

Louisiana is experiencing the highest rate of coastal erosion in America, losing about one hundred yards of land every thirty minutes- land loss the size of a football field every half-hour. The barrier islands of Southeast Louisiana are some of the youngest and most unstable landforms on earth. They average 5000 years in age, and are rapidly changing shape and disappearing due to the man-altered flow of the Mississippi delta. Timbalier Island, for example, averaged 20m/year towards Northwest, during the last century (U.S. geological survey). During the early 1800’s some of the barrier islands served as summer resorts to wealthy families from New Orleans. In 1856 a devastating hurricane hit Isle Dernieres causing great loss of life and property, and nearly splitting the island in half. Since then more than a dozen major storms, including Katrina, changed the geography of the coast. Today, all except Grand Isle are sand bars with a little more than skeletal remnants of industry and a few deteriorating fishing camps. These Islands represent the “First Line of Defense” against large hurricanes.

In addition to environmental and political landscape, this series of photographs addresses the cultural concerns of local population. Cajuns of Louisiana comprise one of the oldest, most unique, and historically significant ethnic cultures in the United States. It is also a culture that is under a dire threat, simply because the land they occupy is physically disappearing. This project combines the cultural documentary with environmental concerns by presenting the Louisiana wetlands issues in context of our global cultural-environmental situation.

The global environmental concerns that place Louisiana in center of world’s attention make this project relevant and timely. Our, often adversarial relationship with the world outside ultimately reveals our inability to adapt to the natural process. These photographs set out to illustrate the results of such failed relations.

 

Civil War in North Carolina

In honor of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, Joyner Library is presenting two exhibits focusing on the war in, and its effects upon, the state of North Carolina. The first exhibit, “The Civil War in North Carolina, 1861-1865,” can be viewed in Joyner’s Special Collections department located on the fourth floor and will run from March 19th through August 10th. This exhibit explores multiple facets of this divisive and devastating war in North Carolina.

Major themes include Battles and Campaigns, The Lives of North Carolina Soldiers, The Home Front, The Slave Experience, Economy, and Politics.
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