Joyner Library Responds to Student Demand with Trial 24/5 Schedule

GREENVILLE, N.C. (8/15/2013) Joyner Library responds to student demand with trial 24/5 operating schedule for the 2013-14 academic year.

Beginning August 19 and continuing through the spring semester, Joyner Library will be open 24 hours a day, 5 days a week.  This pilot initiative is a result of student demand for expanded hours to work on assignments, use library resources, collaborate on group projects, and complete an array of other academic tasks. With the extended hours, the library opens at 10:00 a.m. on Sunday and remains open until closing at 9:00 p.m. on Friday.

After 11:00 p.m., an ECU OneCard is required for entry.  At 2:00 a.m. the basement, second and third floors are closed for housekeeping and reduced staffing, however the first floor remains open overnight.  The second and third floors reopen at 7:30 a.m.  Security staff are present during all operating hours.

According to Mark Sanders, assistant director for Public Services, “We are committed to being responsive to our patrons’ needs and 24 hour access is one of the requests we most frequently receive from students.  We will monitor the hourly building use data during the overnight period of the fall and spring semesters to see if it supports making 24/5 access permanent.  I’m hopeful it will.”

“After sharing the news with my roommate she was more than excited about the 24/5 access to Joyner. I’m certain she’ll utilize this resource to her advantage and she will benefit greatly!” says Cortney Hagans, senior Accounting major.

Joyner Library’s complete operating hours can be found at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/libhours.cfm.  Operating hours are reduced during breaks, intercession periods, and the summer semesters.

Fossil Exhibit at Joyner Library: “Paleontology of Eastern North Carolina”

Through August 31st, the North Carolina Collection at J. Y. Joyner Library is exhibiting fossils from Eastern North Carolina.  The fossils are from the private collections of William O’Neal and Jay Holley. They have been collected over a period of roughly forty years. Mr. Holley is a geologist and instructor who provided technical expertise as well as fossils. The fossils on display are examples of the kind of items that can be found in local waterways, quarries, and other excavations. There are also explanatory materials from books and electronic resources that can be accessed through Joyner Library.

paleonFBpicThe fossils are from a wide date range. The oldest are from the Cretaceous Period, and can be as old as sixty-five million years plus. The youngest are from the Quaternary Period, the Pleistocene Epoch, or the age of large land mammals. These can be as old as 1.8 million years. The primary fossil bearing sediments from the region are marine in nature. The Coastal Plain has not always been dry land. The sands and clays of the area offer ready evidence of the abundance of sea creatures. Limestone from the Southern part of the state tells the same story.

The exhibit can be viewed on the third floor of Joyner Library in the North Carolina Collection. Tours can be arranged, and school groups are welcome. Further information can be obtained at 328-6601 or onealw@ecu.edu .

Fahrenheit 451…..On Display

We are celebrating 60 Years of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, published in 1953. Named one of the most important books of the 20th century, this book is still relevant.

Stop by the Exhibit Gallery on the 2nd floor, to view the display celebrating this classic book as we approach Banned Book Week from September 22nd – 28th.

NEW: The Return, a photography exhibit by Linda Fox

TheReturnExhibit_LfoxPLASMA

Artist Statement:

           Creative processes in which we work — painting, literature, and photography — are not that dissimilar to the creative life processes in which we are immersed and those that surround us. Death as a creative process is a necessary step toward regeneration and renewal. I approach my photographic subjects with the understanding that these images of what I am seeing are also in the midst of a creative process. I utilized the method of series or sequence – to hold the moment in the death-life process, a moment that needed to be suspended, so one could look at it with more than a glance, have a moment to look into time and change, to study its movement and its confusion an   beauty – so that the effect of an image captured in a series on the observer would hold a more lasting, fluid impression.

I photograph common animals encountered in ordinary small town life: animals one might see by the side of the road, a domesticated dog killed by a car, a neighborhood cat, a discarded catfish caught in a nearby river and left behind, a mourning dove that has broken its neck, a deer in season killed by local hunters, a feral fox killed on the highway. These subjects are currently part of a human being’s conscious and unconscious awareness of the animal world in a typical small town. They may be a part but not a necessary part of the human world (excluding the emotional relationship between pet owner and pet); that is, they are elements of the world viewed from an unaffected distance.

“The Return” attempts to recreate visions of the natural world that are more harmonious and less compartmentalized, more wholesome, less segmented, and avoid the segregation of “diseased” versus “healthy,” “polluted” versus “unpolluted,” or “dead” versus “living,” In some small way, I am aiming to encourage a view of the natural world that sees value and beauty in all of its processes.

These photographs were taken with a Nikon D300s digital camera. The images were edited in Adobe Photoshop CS5 on a 2011, 27 in. Apple IMAC. The 20 prints were made on an Epson Stylus Pro 9800 wide-format printer using “Breathing Color: Vibrance Rag” 325GSM fine art paper with high gloss Baryta finish, 100% cotton.

Bio:

Linda Andrea Fox received her MFA and BFA in Photography from East Carolina University School of Art and Design. For eight years she served as the biomedical photographer for Duke University Hospital and the Brody School of Medicine of ECU. She was born in California.

 

Dean’s Message

As the academic year comes to an end, it is a good time to reflect on some of the happenings in Joyner Library.  This year saw the opening of the Pirate CAVE in August and the renovation and grand opening of the Office for Faculty Excellence, the Office of the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP), the University Writing Center, and the University Writing Program in May.  When students and faculty return in the fall, there will be a new Starbucks in Joyner Library, an expanded study area, a state-of-the-art security station, and reconfigured staff space on first floor.  These changes will help us provide a safe, secure 24/5 library space for ECU students, faculty and staff to enjoy beginning on August 20.  We’ll have a new library instruction room (Room 1415) as well.  We’ll expect to set a new record for monthly gate count, breaking the record of 113,979 people set in October.  While group and individual study rooms, powerful computers, large monitors, whiteboards, and equipment available for check-out are part of the attraction, certainly our knowledgeable and helpful faculty and staff and our wealth of print and online resources that support student learning and faculty research are a large part of the attraction.  We look forward to the 2013-2014 academic year bringing even stronger partnerships with the Office of the QEP, the Writing Center, Research & Graduate Studies, Student Affairs, the Student Government Association, and other groups as we continue to work together to make ECU the best institution in the region.

As I come to the end of my first year as Interim Dean, I want to thank a number of individuals and groups for the support they have given to me and to Joyner Library.  Here are just a few of them:

The ECU Faculty Senate Libraries Committee

Provost Sheerer

The Friends of Joyner Library

The Joyner Library Advancement Council

Donors to Joyner Library

The wonderful staff and faculty of Joyner Library

I wish everyone a productive yet reinvigorating summer and look forward to seeing you in August.