Making a Difference

Jane Pollock (Brody School of Medicine) has volunteered with emergency medical services since 1982. (Contributed photo)

Pollock aims to make a difference

By Judy Currin

The year was 1982.

ECU Chancellor John Howell called for an increase in research and public service during his annual faculty convocation, the university registered a record official enrollment of 13,300 students, the School of Medicine found a permanent home in the new Brody Medical Science Building and Jane Pollock began her volunteer service for Pitt County.

Pollock began as one of the original emergency medical service crew members on the first day of operations for Eastern Pines Rescue. She remains the only active paramedic in the county from the first Pitt County paramedic graduating class.

Pollock, training specialist in the Brody School of Medicine, attributes her initial interest in emergency medicine to an automobile accident she and her husband, John, witnessed two years earlier.

“We were following a pickup truck that veered off the right shoulder, overcorrected and ultimately flipped,” Pollock said. “The passenger was ejected from the vehicle, rendering him unconscious.”

While she was able to determine that the injured man was still breathing, her ability to aid was limited.
Some months later the fire department for the community of  Eastern Pines decided to develop an EMS squad. Pollock joined the basic EMT class.

Then a stay-at-home mother of daughter Gwen and son Matthew, she volunteered while they were in school, logging more than 2,000 hours of service a year. She served as scheduler, secretary and lieutenant before becoming the unit’s first female captain.

Pollock joined Brody School of Medicine’s Department of Emergency Medicine in 1990. Qualified as an NC Level II EMS instructor, EMT-paramedic and an emergency medical dispatcher, Pollock has conducted countless training sessions.

“The program for medical responder covers topics on general medical emergencies, CPR and traumatic injuries to prepare those who may be the first to arrive at the scene of an emergency,” Pollock said.
Basic emergency medical technicians training is more advanced, with emphasis on evaluating diagnostic signs, determining the extent of an injury or illness, provide emergency patient care and transport through classroom and clinical training.

“Usually a two year commitment that includes classroom, clinical and field internship, as well as the successful completion of courses in anatomy and physiology, is required to become a paramedic,” Pollock said.

“Conducted over four semesters, the course is designed to educate individuals who have no medical training.” Invasive skills and comprehensive assessments enable trainees to provide advanced life support to the ill or injured patient.

Pollock has conducted training sessions throughout the state adjusting the educational programs to meet the needs of a particular county.  “Literacy levels, economics, the availability of physicians’ offices and nursing homes dictate program emphasis,” Pollock said.

These days, her primary role for the Division of Emergency Medical Services is quality management. She responds to complaints or concerns involving any Pitt County EMS personnel. She works with Dr. Juan March, an emergency physician and Pitt County EMS medical director, to determine if any educational remediation or other action is required.

“Everyone is tested before they ever function on an EMS truck,” Pollock said.

And while on any given day, stacks of call reports await her review, Pollock keeps a hands on approach with a constant desire to provide the best possible patient care out in the field.

“Our mission is to provide and continue to improve the quality of health care services whenever and wherever the patient needs them,” she said.

“It is all about making a difference in their time of need.”

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Making a Difference

The year was 1982.

ECU Chancellor John Howell called for an increase in research and public service during his annual faculty convocation, the university registered a record official enrollment of 13,300 students, the School of Medicine found a permanent home in the new Brody Medical Science Building and Jane Pollock began her volunteer service for Pitt County.

Pollock began as one of the original emergency medical service crew members on the first day of operations for Eastern Pines Rescue. She remains the only active paramedic in the county from the first Pitt County paramedic graduating class.

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FaculTea will Feature Wilson-Okamura

David Wilson-Okamura (English) will present, “How Research worked in the Renaissance” during the FaculTea for Faculty, 3:30 to 5 p.m., Feb. 10 at Joyner Library Conference Room 2408. ECU faculty members are encouraged to join in for tea, cookies and scholarly exchange, while interacting with faculty in other disciplines.

The event is a collaborative effort between Joyner Library and Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

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Great Decisions Program 2011: ECU hosts community forum

On Saturdays through through March 5, ECU is hosting the seventh annual Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions Program. Sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Eastern North Carolina and ECU, the program runs for eight consecutive Saturdays, with presentations from 10 a.m. to noon in the Rivers West Building auditorium. The Feb. 12 session will be held in Rivers, Room N102.

This year’s lecture series will feature academic and professional experts who will discuss topics on rebuilding Haiti, U.S. national security, responding to the financial crisis of 2007-08, the Horn of Africa, the Caucasus, Germany ascendant, sanctions and nonproliferation, and global governance.

All events are free to full-time students and teachers, and a program book may be purchased for $19. For the general public, all eight session are $42, or $6 per session. The program book is not included. WAC members may attend all eight sessions and receive a program book for $32. To register for the event, visit at www.ecu.edu/cs-cas/greatdecisions/home.cfm, and click on registration.

For more information about the Great Decisions Program and a complete list of speakers, visit the website or contact Dr. Sylvie Debevec Henning, ECU director of international studies, at 252-328-5520 or by email at hennings@ecu.edu.

Individuals requesting accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should call 252-737-1016 (voice/TTY) at least 48 hours prior to the event.

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ECU to host 2011 Blue Heron Bowl


ECU’s Institute for Coastal Science and Policy and the Division of Continuing Studies will host the 2011 Blue Heron Bowl, which is the regional competition for the National Ocean Sciences Bowl.

This is the first year ECU will host North Carolina’s competition, which will now rotate every second year between ECU, UNC Wilmington and UNC Chapel Hill. The Blue Heron Bowl will be held Feb. 26, 8 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., with opening remarks beginning at 8 a.m. in Bate 1032.

Coordinated by the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, NOSB is a national academic competition that quizzes high school students on topics related to the study of the oceans and Great Lakes.

The competition consists of 18 teams competing in timed, round-robin and double-elimination sessions that include multiple choice and short answer questions. Questions are drawn from the scientific and technical disciplines used in studying the oceans, including physics, chemistry, geology, atmospheric science and biology, as well as from topics on the contributions of the oceans to national and international economics, history and culture.

Teams include four students, one alternate and a coach. The round-robin portion of the competition will be held beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Bate. Semi-final, double-elimination rounds will continue in the afternoon with the final round at 5:30 p.m. in Bate 1031; the awards ceremony will follow at 6 p.m.

One winning team, two runner-up teams and a “most sportsmanlike” team from the Blue Heron Bowl will each receive a prize and will be provided transportation and room and board to the NOSB competition April 29 – May 1 in Galveston, Texas, where they will compete against 24 other regional winners.

Winning team members of the national competition also will receive a prize. Past prizes have included trips to Southampton Oceanography Centre in England; the Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies on Catalina Island, Calif.; the Florida Keys; cruises on research vessels; visits to oceanographic institutions; scholarships; scientific equipment and books.

Goals of the NOSB competition are to increase knowledge of the oceans and to raise visibility and public understanding of the national investment in ocean-related research. The competition also gives oceanographic research programs the opportunity to develop new connections with their local pre-college community and to open students’ eyes to ocean-related careers.

Ultimately, the success of the Blue Heron Bowl requires the concerted efforts of many volunteer staff and sponsors. Sponsors help offset the costs incurred, while volunteers serve as moderators, scientific judges, rules judges, timekeepers and scorekeepers.

Sponsorships and volunteer opportunities are still available for the Blue Heron Bowl. Interested parties should contact Dr. Jeffery Alejandro, Division of Continuing Studies, at 252-328-9197 or by e-mail at alejandroj@ecu.edu, or Kay Evans, Institute for Coastal Science and Policy, at 252-328-6220 or by e-mail at evanssu@ecu.edu.

For additional information about the Blue Heron Bowl, go to www.ecu.edu/icsp/bhb/2011.

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