Making a Difference

Jane Pollock (Brody School of Medicine) has volunteered with emergency medical services since 1982. (Contributed photo)

Pollock aims to make a difference

By Judy Currin

The year was 1982.

ECU Chancellor John Howell called for an increase in research and public service during his annual faculty convocation, the university registered a record official enrollment of 13,300 students, the School of Medicine found a permanent home in the new Brody Medical Science Building and Jane Pollock began her volunteer service for Pitt County.

Pollock began as one of the original emergency medical service crew members on the first day of operations for Eastern Pines Rescue. She remains the only active paramedic in the county from the first Pitt County paramedic graduating class.

Pollock, training specialist in the Brody School of Medicine, attributes her initial interest in emergency medicine to an automobile accident she and her husband, John, witnessed two years earlier.

“We were following a pickup truck that veered off the right shoulder, overcorrected and ultimately flipped,” Pollock said. “The passenger was ejected from the vehicle, rendering him unconscious.”

While she was able to determine that the injured man was still breathing, her ability to aid was limited.
Some months later the fire department for the community of  Eastern Pines decided to develop an EMS squad. Pollock joined the basic EMT class.

Then a stay-at-home mother of daughter Gwen and son Matthew, she volunteered while they were in school, logging more than 2,000 hours of service a year. She served as scheduler, secretary and lieutenant before becoming the unit’s first female captain.

Pollock joined Brody School of Medicine’s Department of Emergency Medicine in 1990. Qualified as an NC Level II EMS instructor, EMT-paramedic and an emergency medical dispatcher, Pollock has conducted countless training sessions.

“The program for medical responder covers topics on general medical emergencies, CPR and traumatic injuries to prepare those who may be the first to arrive at the scene of an emergency,” Pollock said.
Basic emergency medical technicians training is more advanced, with emphasis on evaluating diagnostic signs, determining the extent of an injury or illness, provide emergency patient care and transport through classroom and clinical training.

“Usually a two year commitment that includes classroom, clinical and field internship, as well as the successful completion of courses in anatomy and physiology, is required to become a paramedic,” Pollock said.

“Conducted over four semesters, the course is designed to educate individuals who have no medical training.” Invasive skills and comprehensive assessments enable trainees to provide advanced life support to the ill or injured patient.

Pollock has conducted training sessions throughout the state adjusting the educational programs to meet the needs of a particular county.  “Literacy levels, economics, the availability of physicians’ offices and nursing homes dictate program emphasis,” Pollock said.

These days, her primary role for the Division of Emergency Medical Services is quality management. She responds to complaints or concerns involving any Pitt County EMS personnel. She works with Dr. Juan March, an emergency physician and Pitt County EMS medical director, to determine if any educational remediation or other action is required.

“Everyone is tested before they ever function on an EMS truck,” Pollock said.

And while on any given day, stacks of call reports await her review, Pollock keeps a hands on approach with a constant desire to provide the best possible patient care out in the field.

“Our mission is to provide and continue to improve the quality of health care services whenever and wherever the patient needs them,” she said.

“It is all about making a difference in their time of need.”

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Making a Difference

The year was 1982.

ECU Chancellor John Howell called for an increase in research and public service during his annual faculty convocation, the university registered a record official enrollment of 13,300 students, the School of Medicine found a permanent home in the new Brody Medical Science Building and Jane Pollock began her volunteer service for Pitt County.

Pollock began as one of the original emergency medical service crew members on the first day of operations for Eastern Pines Rescue. She remains the only active paramedic in the county from the first Pitt County paramedic graduating class.

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FaculTea will Feature Wilson-Okamura

David Wilson-Okamura (English) will present, “How Research worked in the Renaissance” during the FaculTea for Faculty, 3:30 to 5 p.m., Feb. 10 at Joyner Library Conference Room 2408. ECU faculty members are encouraged to join in for tea, cookies and scholarly exchange, while interacting with faculty in other disciplines.

The event is a collaborative effort between Joyner Library and Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

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Great Decisions Program 2011: ECU hosts community forum

On Saturdays through through March 5, ECU is hosting the seventh annual Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions Program. Sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Eastern North Carolina and ECU, the program runs for eight consecutive Saturdays, with presentations from 10 a.m. to noon in the Rivers West Building auditorium. The Feb. 12 session will be held in Rivers, Room N102.

This year’s lecture series will feature academic and professional experts who will discuss topics on rebuilding Haiti, U.S. national security, responding to the financial crisis of 2007-08, the Horn of Africa, the Caucasus, Germany ascendant, sanctions and nonproliferation, and global governance.

All events are free to full-time students and teachers, and a program book may be purchased for $19. For the general public, all eight session are $42, or $6 per session. The program book is not included. WAC members may attend all eight sessions and receive a program book for $32. To register for the event, visit at www.ecu.edu/cs-cas/greatdecisions/home.cfm, and click on registration.

For more information about the Great Decisions Program and a complete list of speakers, visit the website or contact Dr. Sylvie Debevec Henning, ECU director of international studies, at 252-328-5520 or by email at hennings@ecu.edu.

Individuals requesting accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should call 252-737-1016 (voice/TTY) at least 48 hours prior to the event.

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ECU to host 2011 Blue Heron Bowl


ECU’s Institute for Coastal Science and Policy and the Division of Continuing Studies will host the 2011 Blue Heron Bowl, which is the regional competition for the National Ocean Sciences Bowl.

This is the first year ECU will host North Carolina’s competition, which will now rotate every second year between ECU, UNC Wilmington and UNC Chapel Hill. The Blue Heron Bowl will be held Feb. 26, 8 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., with opening remarks beginning at 8 a.m. in Bate 1032.

Coordinated by the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, NOSB is a national academic competition that quizzes high school students on topics related to the study of the oceans and Great Lakes.

The competition consists of 18 teams competing in timed, round-robin and double-elimination sessions that include multiple choice and short answer questions. Questions are drawn from the scientific and technical disciplines used in studying the oceans, including physics, chemistry, geology, atmospheric science and biology, as well as from topics on the contributions of the oceans to national and international economics, history and culture.

Teams include four students, one alternate and a coach. The round-robin portion of the competition will be held beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Bate. Semi-final, double-elimination rounds will continue in the afternoon with the final round at 5:30 p.m. in Bate 1031; the awards ceremony will follow at 6 p.m.

One winning team, two runner-up teams and a “most sportsmanlike” team from the Blue Heron Bowl will each receive a prize and will be provided transportation and room and board to the NOSB competition April 29 – May 1 in Galveston, Texas, where they will compete against 24 other regional winners.

Winning team members of the national competition also will receive a prize. Past prizes have included trips to Southampton Oceanography Centre in England; the Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies on Catalina Island, Calif.; the Florida Keys; cruises on research vessels; visits to oceanographic institutions; scholarships; scientific equipment and books.

Goals of the NOSB competition are to increase knowledge of the oceans and to raise visibility and public understanding of the national investment in ocean-related research. The competition also gives oceanographic research programs the opportunity to develop new connections with their local pre-college community and to open students’ eyes to ocean-related careers.

Ultimately, the success of the Blue Heron Bowl requires the concerted efforts of many volunteer staff and sponsors. Sponsors help offset the costs incurred, while volunteers serve as moderators, scientific judges, rules judges, timekeepers and scorekeepers.

Sponsorships and volunteer opportunities are still available for the Blue Heron Bowl. Interested parties should contact Dr. Jeffery Alejandro, Division of Continuing Studies, at 252-328-9197 or by e-mail at alejandroj@ecu.edu, or Kay Evans, Institute for Coastal Science and Policy, at 252-328-6220 or by e-mail at evanssu@ecu.edu.

For additional information about the Blue Heron Bowl, go to www.ecu.edu/icsp/bhb/2011.

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Family Medicine Center

By Doug Boyd

Patient Robert Fulghum, left, and Dr. Robert Newman talk in the ECU Family Medicine Center. The center recently received national recognition as a patient-centered medical home. (Photo by Doug Boyd)

The Family Medicine Center at ECU has gained recognition as a “patient-centered medical home” from a national organization.

The National Committee for Quality Assurance has identified the center as a medical practice where each patient has an ongoing relationship with a doctor who leads a team that takes responsibility for patient care and, when needed, arranges referrals for care with other doctors.

ECU achieved level III recognition, the highest possible.

“NCQA certification is a formal recognition that we have created a patient-centered medical home that allows for easy access for our patients, continuity with the same medical provider, (and) comprehensive care including hospital care and obstetrical care,” said Dr. Robert Newman, vice chair for clinical services for the ECU Department of Family Medicine. “We have also started to measure our clinical performance and patient-satisfaction scores against nationally established benchmarks.”

Patient Robert Fulghum, a retired microbiology faculty member at ECU and a patient of Newman’s, said he has recommended the Family Medicine Center to several people who wanted to establish care at a medical practice.

“They don’t just examine you and say, ‘Here, take these pills,’ and send you off,” said Fulghum, 81. “They allow you to participate in the decisions that are made.”

When referrals to specialists are needed, Family Medicine Center staff members assist with that and follow up. “However, I haven’t really felt the need to go to a specialist,” Fulghum said.

Faculty and staff members began working on the certification in February 2009 and submitted an application in April.

Numerous physician groups contributed to the nine standards for measuring patient-centered medical homes, such as access, communication, care management and referral tracking.

“The patient-centered medical home promises to improve health and health care,” said NCQA President Margaret E. O’Kane. “The active, ongoing relationship between a patient and a physician in medical homes fosters an all-too-rare goal in care: staying healthy and preventing illness in the first place.”

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Tuthill fits the bill

Lynn Tuthill (Brody School of Medicine) is an active volunteer with District 65 of the State Employees Association of North Carolina. Above, she displays the District of the Year award presented to the district. (Contributed photo)

By Judy Currin

Wanted: Individual possessing practically unlimited reserves of energy, a willingness to sacrifice untold hours of time in service to the community and a creative flair for documenting history in scrapbook format.

Position filled: by Lynn Tuthill, a remittance specialist in the Clinical Financial Services Department for the Brody School of Medicine, who applies her energy, time and creativity toward her volunteer work for District 65 in the State Employees Association of North Carolina.

Tuthill serves SEANC as a board member and volunteer action chair/historian. Her scrapbook – a yearly compilation of the organization’s activities – is more aptly described as a tome. Bulging to approximately four inches thick, the book is chockfull of news clippings, meeting minutes, flyers, board member profiles and awards, along with page after page of photographs, taken by Tuthill during district activities.

“We are a pretty busy group of volunteers,” said Tuthill, a second year inductee into ECU’s Servire Society.

A quick glance at the scrapbook makes it clear. This group has worked hard to earn the many honors they have received, including the District of the Year for 2008-2009 and for 2009-2010.

Leafing through the initial pages of the scrapbook, one might see photographic documentation of the group’s participation in Pitt County’s Relay for Life, an overnight event that celebrates the lives of those who have battled cancer and remembers loved ones lost.

“We raised approximately $7,000 for the American Cancer Society,” said Tuthill. She said the district has had a team in the Pitt County Relay for more than 15 years, raising approximately $50,000 altogether.

Farther along in the scrapbook, photos appear from the annual golf tournament, which raises funds for SEANC’s scholarship program. “Every year, our organization provides $50,000 in scholarship grants for members and their dependents statewide,” Tuthill said. “Locally, we provide a total of $1,500.”

Scrapbook pages also document the election of new officers, membership drives, lobbying activities, luncheons, meetings, training, and donations to families. Special emphasis is given to volunteer work for the Children’s Miracle Network Celebration broadcast, which provides equipment and services for sick and injured children and their families, and Habitat for Humanity, which constructs affordable homes in an effort to eliminate poverty.

In December, page after page illustrates the group’s numerous efforts to help families in need. As part of their holiday activities, Tuthill said, the group decorates miniature Christmas trees each year for a local nursing home and participates in the Club Rudolph program through the Greenville Community Shelter, which helps families needing assistance.

“Each year we adopt two children,” Tuthill said. “The district donates $150.00 per child towards the purchase of Christmas gifts from their wish list.”

Of all the pages in the book, Tuthill finds the Relay for Life images the most compelling. That event is “closest to my heart,” she said. “Cancer has taken several people who were close to me. I pray and hope one day in my lifetime, they will find a cure.”

As evidenced by her arduous work on the scrapbook, Tuthill always applies her best efforts to the work for SEANC District 65. Debbie Austin, SEANC treasurer and scholarship chair, said, “Lynn goes above and beyond what is needed for all the projects she does.”

“Her vision is to take any cause and make it a success for the greater good.”

SEANC is a 55,000-member association committed to protecting and enhancing the rights and benefits of current, retired and future state employees. Local members meet on the third Tuesday of every month at Lakeside Annex 1. Tuthill encourages all ECU employees to attend meetings and join a district that thrives on giving back to the community.

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The SEANC scrapbook illustrates many hours of volunteer efforts completed through the organization. As SEANC historian, Tuthill puts the book together. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

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Cola Contract

Zak McLamb, left, and Jeff Ferber haul a Coke machine up the stairs at the Whichard Building Annex Dec. 20 on East Carolina University's campus. McLamb said he and Ferber, both Coca-Cola Bottling Company employees, were placing an average of 10 machines a day on campus. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

GREENVILLE   (Dec. 22, 2010) —  East Carolina University officials have awarded exclusive pouring rights to Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated, after reviewing request for proposal responses submitted to the university.

The contract gives Coke the exclusive right to sell its products on campus for a period of 10 years beginning January 1, 2011. This replaces the previous contract with Minges Bottling Group, a Pepsi-Cola company, which had been in place since 1998. The East Carolina University Board of Trustees was advised of the award at their November meeting.

ECU Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance–Business Services Scott Buck said the bidding process was more complex due to state requirements to separately request proposals for soft drinks, juice, and bottled water. Coca-Cola’s combined bids totaled $10.5 million for the 10-year period.

“We have enjoyed a positive working relationship with Pepsi and the Minges Bottling Group and have a tremendous respect for the Minges family and their ties to East Carolina and the region,” said Buck. “This new contract represents the beginning of a new relationship, and we are extremely pleased with the generous commitment that Coke has made to ECU.”

ECU followed the trend of most other universities in the 1990s of awarding an exclusive contract to a beverage provider in order to generate revenue for the school. Canned, bottled, and fountain drinks sold or distributed on campus, in university dining halls, cafes and convenience shops, as well as at all athletic concessions, special events, and vending machines are covered under the contract.

The university will allocate the revenue from the new contract to academic merit scholarships, athletic scholarships, and leadership and educational projects. The Athletics Department will receive funding for capital projects. A percentage will go to an endowment fund for academic scholarships, an endowment fund for grants-in-aid to student-athletes. And a portion will go to continue funding a staff/faculty textbook loan program and faculty/student leadership programs.

A request for proposals was distributed in September and bids were opened October 18. Auxiliary Services Director Willie Lee coordinated the bid process and is the contract administrator.

“We expect a smooth transition as campus facilities and equipment are changed from one provider to the other,” said Lee.  “Students, staff, and faculty will see the changes when they return for the spring semester after the holidays.”

One thing that will not immediately change is the price. Under the new contract, vending prices will remain the same for most products for at least three years. After that time, pricing will be evaluated, and any decisions to adjust prices will be made jointly.

Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated carries a number of different popular brands in almost every category. Coke’s lineup includes traditional soft drinks such as Coke, Diet Coke, Coke Zero, Cherry Coke, Sprite, Sprite Zero, Mello Yello, Dr. Pepper, Diet Dr. Pepper, Fanta Orange and Grape, Seagram’s Ginger Ale, Nestea, Hi-C, and Sundrop. Additionally, Coke will be offering juice products, such as Minute Maid, Fuze, V8 Splash and V8 Fusion blends, as well as bottled water products that include Dasani, Vitaminwater, and Smartwater. Coke will also carry Powerade, Full Throttle and NOS in the isotonic and energy drink categories. While not all types of beverages will be offered at every venue, the product assortment will be adjusted based on product sales and customer preference in specific areas.

Representatives of the local Coca-Cola bottler said they are excited to be back on ECU’s campus. Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated has their corporate offices in Charlotte and is very familiar with having exclusive rights on college campuses, including similar relationships with universities including N.C. State, West Virginia, Clemson, and the University of South Carolina.

For more information about the transition, visit http://www.ecu.edu/vending/coke.cfm

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Faculty Authors

Marjorie Ringler with the Department of Educational Leadership, left, is congratulated by Provost Marilyn Sheerer during the first Academic Affairs Faculty Book Awards recognition, hosted by Joyner Library.

Joyner Library hosts inaugural program honoring faculty authors

The inaugural program at J.Y. Joyner Library at East Carolina University honoring faculty members who published books during the previous year recognized 38 faculty members Thursday.

The Academic Affairs Faculty Book Awards event honored faculty in the colleges and schools that are part of the Division of Academic Affairs. The awards recognized peer-reviewed books authored, co-authored or edited by ECU faculty and published between July 1, 2009, and July 30, 2010.

“Publishing a scholarly book is a significant professional achievement for university faculty. We want to recognize our scholars and reward them for their research efforts. The library is an important partner in the creation of scholarly output so it’s a natural fit for us to host such an event,” said Dr. Larry Boyer, dean of Academic Library and Learning Resources.

Provost Marilyn Sheerer was at the event to congratulate the honorees. “Acknowledging our faculty who authored books is one of the most important activities in which we could engage,” she said. “Book publication represents one of our highest forms of scholarship and faculty should be duly recognized.”

Faculty members honored are as follows:

Eric Bailey, Dept. of Anthropology; Alice Arnold, School of Art and Design; Jessica Christie, School of Art and Design; Elizabeth Hodge, Dept. of Business and Information Technologies Education; Huanqing Lu, Dept. of Construction Management; Elizabeth Fogarty, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction – Elementary Education; Mark L’Esperance, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction – English History and Middle Grades; Peggy Yates, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction – Elementary Education; Andrzej Grodner, Dept. of Economics; Anna Froula, Dept. of English: Film Studies; Donald Palumbo, Dept. of English; Margaret Bauer, Dept. of English; Wendy Sharer, Dept. of English; Kirk St. Amant, Dept. of English; Ken Parille, Dept. of English.

And Catherine Smith, Dept. of English; Tarek Abdel-Salam, Dept. of Engineering; Ed Howard, Dept. of Engineering; Katie Ford, Dept. of Foreign Language and Literature – Spanish; Peter Standish, Dept. of Foreign Language and Literature – Spanish; Glen Gilbert, College of Health and Human Performance; Christopher Oakley, Dept. of History; Larry Tise, Dept. of History; Hal Holloman, Dept. of Educational Leadership; Crystal Chambers, Dept. of Higher, Adult, and Counselor Education; Marjorie Ringler, Dept. of Educational Leadership; David Siegel, Dept. of Higher, Adult, and Counselor Education; David Hursh, Academic Library Services; Kaye Dotson, Dept. of Library Science; Jami Jones, Dept. of Library Science; John Kros, Dept. of Marketing & Supply Chain Management.

And Michael Bosse, Dept. of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education; Richard McCarty, Dept. of Philosophy; Altheia Cook, Dept. of Political Science; Peter Francia, Dept. of Political Science; Bonnie Mani, Dept. of Political Science; Debra Jordan, Dept. of Recreation and Leisure Studies; and David Knox, Dept. of Sociology.

Joyner Library collects, organizes, preserves and provides access to books for education, research and enrichment. A shelf in the circulation reading room has been designated to highlight books by ECU faculty, and all works are available for check out.

The program was made possible with support from the Office of the Provost.

Inspiration for this awards ceremony was drawn from the annual program of Laupus Library that recognizes scholarship by faculty in the ECU Division of Health Sciences.

For more information, contact Dawn Wainwright at 252-328-4090.

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